9781568583549

The Samaritan's Dilemma: Should Government Help Your Neighbor?

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781568583549

  • ISBN10:

    1568583540

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 6/30/2008
  • Publisher: Perseus Books Group

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $59!
    Your order must be $59 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $25.95 Save up to $24.95
  • Rent Book $9.08
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE
    HURRY! ONLY 1 COPY IN STOCK AT THIS PRICE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Used and Rental copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Politics has become a synonym for all that is dirty, corrupt, dishonest, compromising, and wrong. For many people, politics seems not only remote from their daily lives but abhorrent to their personal values. Outside of the rare inspirational politician or social movement, politics is a wasteland of apathy and disinterest.It wasnrs"t always this way. For Americans who came of age shortly after World War II, politics was a field of dreams. Democracy promised to cure the worldrs"s ills. But starting in the late seventies, conservative economists promoted self-interest as the source of all good, and their view became public policy. Governmentrs"s main role was no longer to help people, but to get out of the way of personal ambition. Politics turned mean and citizens turned away.In this moving and powerful blend of political essay and reportage, award-winning political scientist Deborah Stone argues that democracy depends on altruism, not self-interest. The merchants of self-interest have divorced us from what we know in our pores: we care about other people and go out of our way to help them. Altruism is such a robust motive that we commonly lie, cheat, steal, and break laws to do right by others. "After 3:30, yours"re a private citizen," one home health aide told Stone, explaining why she was willing to risk her job to care for a man the government wanted to cut off from Medicare.The Samaritanrs"s Dilemmacalls on us to restore the public sphere as a place where citizens can fulfill their moral aspirations. If government helps the neighbors, citizens will once again want to help govern. With unforgettable stories of how real people think and feel when they practice kindness, Stone shows that everyday altruism is the premier school for citizenship. Helping others shows people their common humanity and their power to make a difference.At a time when millions of citizens ache to put the Bush and Reagan era behind us and feel proud of their government, Deborah Stone offers an enormously hopeful vision of politics.

Author Biography

Deborah Stone is a Visiting and Research Professor at Dartmouth University’s Department of Government. She is the author of Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision-Making, which in 2002 won the Aaron Wildavsky Award from the American Political Science Association for its enduring contribution to policy studies. She is a founding editor of The American Prospect.

Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
The American Malaisep. 7
Seven Bad Arguments Against Helpp. 35
Everyday Altruismp. 91
The Samaritan Rebellionp. 137
Engines of Democracyp. 175
Bonds and Bridgesp. 201
The Moment of Powerp. 219
How Government Should Help Your Neighborp. 245
Epilogue: Beyond the Samaritan's Dilemmap. 281
Acknowledgmentsp. 293
Notesp. 295
Indexp. 317
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

Rewards Program

Write a Review