CART

(0) items

Scene Design and Stage Lighting,9780534259853
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Scene Design and Stage Lighting

by
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780534259853

ISBN10:
0534259855
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/14/2002
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $156.66
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $78.26
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Scene Design And Stage Lighting
    Scene Design And Stage Lighting
  • Scene Design and Stage Lighting
    Scene Design and Stage Lighting
  • Scene Design and Stage Lighting (with InfoTrac)
    Scene Design and Stage Lighting (with InfoTrac)




Summary

SCENE DESIGN AND STAGE LIGHTING, Eighth Edition, continues its tradition of being the most detailed and comprehensive text available in the scenic and lighting design and technology fields. Much of the scenery design and technology section has been re-worked with an emphasis on modern technology. Changes in the lighting section reflect current practice and technology. The authors have placed an emphasis on collaboration in all sections of the new text. "Designers at Work" interviews with professional lighting and scenery designers are a new addition to the Eighth Edition. In addition, the entirely re-written section on sound for the theatre reflects the digital age we live and work in.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
PART I Creating a Design 1(106)
Introduction
2(11)
Theatrical Form
3(2)
Physical Form
5(5)
Scene Design
10(3)
The Total Dramatic Effect
10(1)
Qualities of Designers
11(1)
Design Collaboration
11(2)
Scene Design and the Theatre
13(14)
The Theatrical Medium
13(3)
Theatre as an Organization
13(2)
Theatre as a Show
15(1)
Theatre as a Machine
15(1)
The Physical Stage and Its Auditorium
16(11)
Proscenium Theatre
16(2)
Staging for the Proscenium Theatre
18(2)
Sightlines
20(1)
Staging in Front of the Proscenium
21(3)
Arena Theatre
24(1)
Flexible Staging
24(3)
Scene Design as a Visual Art
27(18)
Design and the Designer
27(1)
Composition and the Elements of Design
28(10)
Line
28(2)
Scale
30(1)
Movement
30(3)
Light
33(2)
Color
35(1)
Texture
36(2)
Principles of Composition
38(2)
Harmony
38(1)
Contrast
38(1)
Variation
39(1)
Emphasis
39(1)
Gradation
39(1)
Composition, Space, and Depth
40(1)
Composition and Unity
41(2)
Balance and Movement
42(1)
Proportion and Rhythm
42(1)
Composition and Interest
43(2)
The Design Process
45(37)
Function of Scene Design for Drama
45(6)
Placing the Action
46(1)
Establishing Mood
47(1)
Reinforcing the Theme
48(2)
Staging the Story
50(1)
Design and Other Theatrical Forms
51(1)
How to Begin
52(15)
Analysis of the Script, Libretto, or Scenario
52(2)
Determining the Visual Style
54(7)
Developing the Design Approach
61(4)
Rereading the Play
65(1)
Planning the Scheme of Production
65(2)
Visual Presentation of the Design Idea
67(13)
Preliminary Studies
68(1)
The Sketch
69(3)
The Model
72(2)
The Computer Model
74(2)
Computer-Generated Design
76(1)
Designer's Preparations for the Shops
77(1)
The Costume Sketch
78(1)
Lighting Design Presentation
79(1)
Theatrical Design Outside the Theatre
80(2)
Trade Shows
80(1)
Television and Film
80(1)
Historical Pageants
80(1)
Theme Parks
81(1)
Drafting the Design
82(25)
Drafting Equipment
82(4)
The Graphics of Design
86(3)
Drafting Conventions
89(2)
Line Symbols
89(2)
Scaled Drawings
91(1)
The Ground Plan
91(3)
Symbols
92(1)
Labeling
93(1)
Dimensions
93(1)
Dimensioning the Ground Plan
93(1)
Sections
94(3)
Designer's Elevations
97(3)
Computer-Aided Drafting
100(2)
Drafting Three-Dimensional Scenery
102(1)
Planning Properties
103(1)
Pictorial Drawings
104(3)
PART II Realizing the Design 107(182)
The Scene Shop, Tools, and Equipment
108(47)
The Scenery Shop
108(4)
Space Requirements
109(1)
Work Areas
109(3)
Scenery Materials and Tools
112(1)
Building Scenery with Wood
112(16)
Types of Wood
112(1)
Grades and Sizes of Lumber
113(2)
Measuring and Marking Tools
115(1)
Wood-Cutting Tools
116(4)
Wood-Shaping Tools
120(2)
Boring Tools
122(2)
Wood-Construction Tools and Hardware
124(3)
Pneumatic Tools
127(1)
Building Scenery with Metal
128(17)
Types of Metal
128(1)
Forming and Fabricating Metal
129(3)
Metalworking Tools and Equipment
132(1)
Measuring and Marking Tools
132(2)
Shaping Tools
134(1)
Cutting Tools
135(2)
Basic Metal-Joining Tools and Materials
137(1)
Soldering
138(1)
Welding
139(6)
Cover Stock
145(1)
Covering Fabrics
145(1)
Hard Surfaces
145(1)
Scenery Hardware
146(6)
Fastening Hardware
146(3)
Stage Hardware
149(3)
Rigging
152(3)
Rope
152(1)
Cable
153(1)
Wire
154(1)
Chain
154(1)
Building the Scenery
155(32)
Soft Scenery
156(4)
Stage Draperies
156(2)
Drops
158(1)
The Cyclorama
159(1)
Framed Scenery
160(8)
Wood Scenic Construction
160(3)
Framing Curved Scenery
163(1)
Metal-Framed Scenery
164(1)
Doors
164(2)
Windows
166(1)
Trim
167(1)
Weight-Bearing Structures
168(6)
Platforms
168(4)
Free Forms
172(2)
Steps
174(1)
Non-Weight-Bearing Structures
174(11)
Textured and Sculptured Surfaces
176(4)
Thermoplastics
180(4)
Mirrors
184(1)
Shop-Built Jigs
185(2)
Color in the Design
187(12)
The Language of Color
188(4)
Hue
188(1)
Value
189(1)
Chroma
190(2)
Color Mixing
192(2)
Additive Mixing
193(1)
Subtractive Mixing
194(1)
Color in Pigment
194(1)
Color and Light
195(1)
Color Vision
195(2)
Intensity and Color Overload
196(1)
Color Sensation and Subjective Response
196(1)
Color Manipulation
197(2)
The Color Scheme
197(1)
The Color Plot
198(1)
Color Modification
198(1)
Painting Scenery
199(26)
Paint and Color
199(5)
Components of Paint
200(1)
Scenic Paint
200(1)
Aniline Dyes
201(1)
Toxicity of Paint and Dye
202(2)
Painter's Elevations
204(1)
Painting Procedure
204(15)
Size Coat
204(2)
Prime Coat
206(1)
Cartooning
206(2)
Base Coat
208(1)
Detail and Decorative Painting
208(7)
Textured Surfaces
215(2)
Surface Materials
217(2)
Methods of Painting
219(2)
Horizontal Painting
219(1)
Vertical Painting
220(1)
Brushes and Other Equipment
221(2)
Types of Brushes
221(1)
How to Clean Brushes
222(1)
Other Painting Tools and Supplies
223(1)
Flameproofing
223(2)
Handling Scenery
225(38)
Factors Influencing the Handling of Scenery
225(2)
The Play
225(1)
The Theatre
226(1)
The Design
226(1)
The Budget
227(1)
Backstage Organization
227(1)
Stage Manager
227(1)
Stage Carpenter
227(1)
Master Electrician
227(1)
Property Master
228(1)
Sound Technician
228(1)
Wardrobe Supervisor
228(1)
Manual Running of Scenery on the Floor
228(4)
Handling
228(1)
Stiffening, Bracing, and Joining
229(3)
Flying Scenery
232(12)
Grid
233(1)
Line-Sets
233(1)
The Hemp System
233(1)
The Counterweight System
234(1)
The Dead Lift System
234(1)
Rigging
235(7)
Variable Load
242(1)
Curtain Rigging
242(2)
Scenery on Casters
244(15)
Casters
244(3)
Lift and Tip Jacks
247(1)
Outrigger Wagons
248(1)
Wagons
248(1)
The Air-Bearing Caster
249(2)
Wagon Movements
251(2)
The Automated Deck
253(1)
The Revolving Stage
253(6)
Lifts and Elevator Stages
259(3)
Small Lifts and Traps
260(2)
The Elevator Floor
262(1)
The Computer Backstage
262(1)
Stage Properties and the Designer
263(26)
Properties Versus Scenery
264(2)
Definition of Properties
264(1)
Classification by Size and Use
265(1)
Generating a Prop List
266(1)
Selecting Properties
266(6)
Period Style and Decorative Form
266(2)
Draperies and Window Dressings
268(3)
Borrowing or Renting Properties
271(1)
Making and Remaking Furniture
272(4)
Floor Covering
276(1)
Fabricating and Casting Techniques
277(6)
Papier-Mache
277(1)
Alternatives to Papier-Mache
278(1)
Styrofoam
278(1)
Fiberglass
279(1)
Mask Making and Body Armor
279(4)
Visual Effects
283(3)
Breakaways
283(2)
Foliage
285(1)
Fire Onstage
286(1)
Sound Effects
286(1)
Adhesives
286(2)
The Computer and Props
288(1)
PART III Sound for the Theatre 289(54)
Sound and Music in the Theatre
290(25)
Fundamentals of Sound
290(8)
The Phenomenon of Sound
291(2)
Digital Audio
293(1)
Measuring Sound
293(2)
Perception
295(2)
Acoustics
297(1)
Sound in the Theatre
298(5)
Reinforcement
298(2)
Live Music
300(1)
Audio Communications
301(1)
Functions of Sound Design
302(1)
Elements of Sound Design
303(6)
Music
303(1)
Sound Effects
304(2)
Synthetic and Processed Sound
306(2)
Speaker Placement
308(1)
The Process of Designing Sound for the Theatre
309(6)
The Sound Designer and the Design Team
309(1)
Design
309(2)
Preproduction
311(1)
Sound Plot
312(1)
Production
313(2)
Sound Systems and Equipment
315(28)
The Sound Systems
315(7)
The Recording System
316(2)
The Playback System
318(2)
The Reinforcement System
320(2)
Combination Systems
322(1)
The Equipment
322(12)
Microphones
322(6)
Tape Playback Equipment
328(1)
Optical Playback
328(1)
Digital Audio Workstations
329(1)
Mixers
329(1)
Signal Processors
330(1)
Amplifiers
331(1)
Loudspeakers
332(2)
Essential Sound Design Skills
334(9)
How to Do Wiring and Use Connectors
334(3)
How to Work with Digital Audio
337(1)
How to Make Live Recordings
338(1)
How to Work with Wireless Microphones
339(1)
How to Control Feedback
340(1)
How to Select and Place Performance Microphones
341(1)
How to Place Speakers
341(2)
PART IV Stage Lighting 343(279)
Introduction to Stage-Lighting Design
344(23)
Stage Lighting
344(4)
The Scene Designer
345(1)
The Lighting Designer
345(3)
Qualities of Light
348(3)
Intensity
348(1)
Distribution
348(2)
Color
350(1)
Movement
350(1)
Stage Lighting and the Elements of Design
351(3)
Line
351(1)
Scale
352(1)
Movement
352(1)
Light
353(1)
Color
353(1)
Texture
353(1)
Stage Lighting and Theatrical Form
354(2)
Production and Lighting Style
354(1)
Physical Plant
354(2)
Functions of Stage Lighting
356(6)
Selective Visibility
356(1)
Composition
357(1)
Revelation of Form
358(1)
Establishing the Mood
358(2)
Reinforcing the Theme
360(2)
The Role of the Lighting Designer
362(1)
Preparation
362(1)
Rehearsals
362(1)
Preproduction
363(1)
Production
363(1)
The Assistant Lighting Designer
363(1)
The Lighting Laboratory
364(2)
Development of a Lighting Designer
366(1)
Stage-Lighting Practice: Distribution
367(21)
Lighting the Actor
367(2)
Natural Lighting
368(1)
Highlight and Shadow
368(1)
Angles and Direction of Light
369(8)
Front-Light
369(3)
Back-Light
372(1)
Side-Light
373(1)
Lighting Positions
374(3)
Lighting the Acting Area
377(8)
The Area-Lighting Method
377(4)
Other Methods
381(1)
Lighting Flexibility
382(2)
Specials and Follow Spots
384(1)
Lighting the Background
385(3)
Walls
385(1)
Backings
385(1)
Backdrops and Sky Cycs
385(3)
Color and Light
388(21)
Color is Light
388(1)
The Visible Spectrum
389(1)
C.I.E. Chromaticity Chart
389(1)
The Language of Color
389(1)
Hue
390(1)
Chroma or Saturation
390(1)
Color Temperature
390(1)
Color Filtering
390(1)
Color Interaction
391(2)
The Color Triangle
391(1)
Color Mixing
392(1)
Color Reflection
392(1)
Color Perception
393(2)
Color Physiology
393(1)
Intensity and Color
394(1)
Retinal Fatigue
394(1)
Interaction of Colors
395(1)
Designing With Color
395(3)
Color Correction
396(1)
Amber Drift
396(1)
Mixing on a Surface
396(1)
Mixing in the Air
397(1)
Choosing Color
397(1)
A Method of Using Color
398(4)
Warm and Cool Colors
399(1)
Using Color Modification
399(1)
Colored Light and the Actor
400(1)
Colored Light and the Scenery
400(1)
Color on the Sky
401(1)
Selecting Color
401(1)
Color Media
402(7)
Plastic Media
402(2)
Colored Glass
404(1)
Dichroic Glass
404(2)
Automated Color Changers
406(1)
Diffusion Material
407(2)
Intensity Control
409(26)
The History of Dimming
410(3)
Resistance Dimmers
410(1)
Autotransformer Dimmers
411(1)
Preset Systems
412(1)
Elements of Electronic Control
413(7)
Electronic Dimming
414(2)
The Interconnect System
416(2)
The Dimmer-per-Circuit System
418(1)
Early Computerized Memory Systems
418(2)
Types of Electronic Control
420(10)
Manual Systems
420(4)
State-of-the-art Memory Systems
424(1)
Interfacing from Controller to Dimmer
424(1)
Types of Systems
425(5)
Designing with Electronic Control
430(3)
Limited Dimmer Control
430(1)
Control and Patching
430(1)
Features of Electronic Systems
431(2)
The Operator and Remote Control
433(2)
Distribution Control: Lighting Instruments
435(39)
Choosing the Right Instrument
435(2)
Instrument Inventory and Budget
435(1)
Physical Restrictions
436(1)
Quality of Light
436(1)
Intensity and Color Temperature of the Source
436(1)
Beam Shaping and Control
436(1)
The Physics of Reflection and Refraction
437(6)
Specular Reflection
437(1)
Types of Reflectors
438(3)
Refraction of Light
441(2)
The Plano-Convex Spotlight
443(1)
The Ellipsoidal Reflector Spotlight
443(8)
ERS Beam Shaping
445(1)
ERS Lenses
446(2)
ERS Beam and Field Angles
448(2)
ERS Beam Characteristics
450(1)
ERS Sizes
450(1)
The Fresnel Spotlight
451(4)
The Fresnel Lens
452(1)
Fresnel Operational Features
453(1)
Fresnel Beam Characteristics
454(1)
Fresnel Sizes
454(1)
The Par Fixture
455(3)
The PAR-64 Lamp
456(1)
The Source Four PAR
456(1)
PAR Characteristics
457(1)
Other Theatre Instruments
458(14)
Other Parabolic Reflector Instruments
458(1)
Automated Fixtures
459(7)
High Intensity Discharge (HID) Fixtures
466(1)
Follow Spots
466(4)
Cyclorama and Backdrop Lighting Fixtures
470(2)
Floodlights
472(1)
Borderlights
472(1)
Care and Handling
472(2)
Projection, Practicals, and Effects
474(29)
Light as Scenery
474(9)
The Development of Light as Scenery
474(1)
Light as a Scheme of Production
475(3)
Projected Scenery
478(1)
The Projection Surface
478(4)
Lighting the Actor
482(1)
Projecton Techniques and Equipment
483(11)
Lens Projectors
483(1)
35mm Projectors
484(2)
Large-Format Projectors
486(2)
Video Projectors
488(1)
Other Projectors
488(6)
Practicals
494(3)
Fire Effects
494(2)
Lighting Fixtures
496(1)
Special Effects
497(5)
Moon and Stars
497(1)
Lightning
497(2)
Explosions and Flashes
499(1)
Smoke, Fog, and Haze
500(2)
Electrically Triggered Effects
502(1)
Stage-Lighting Practice: The Light Plot and Production
503(27)
Design Decisions
503(4)
Choice of Instrument
503(3)
Choice of Angle and Direction
506(1)
Choice of Color
506(1)
Choice of Control
507(1)
The Collaborative Process
507(3)
Production Collaboration
507(1)
The Storyboard
507(1)
The Lighting Score
508(2)
The Light Plot
510(14)
Drafting the Plot
510(7)
The Lighting Section
517(2)
The Hookup and Instrument Schedule
519(2)
Lighting Paperwork
521(3)
Realizing the Plot
524(6)
Final Preparations
524(2)
The Hang
526(1)
The Focus
527(1)
Lighting and Technical Rehearsals
528(1)
Dress Rehearsals
529(1)
Previews
529(1)
Opening
529(1)
Stage Lighting and Electricity
530(20)
Atomic Theory
530(1)
Sources of Electric Current
531(3)
Batteries
531(1)
Generators
532(2)
Electric Units of Measurement
534(2)
Volts
534(1)
Amperes
535(1)
Ohms
535(1)
Watts
535(1)
The Power Formula
535(1)
Ohm's Law
535(1)
Alternating Current
536(4)
Transformers
536(1)
AC Service
536(1)
Two-, Three-, and Four-Wire Systems
537(1)
Series and Parallel Circuits
538(2)
Conductors and Insulators
540(2)
Grounding
541(1)
Wire Color Codes
541(1)
Stage Cable
541(1)
Stage Connectors
542(3)
Twist-Lock Connectors
542(1)
Pin Connectors
543(1)
Wiring Connectors
544(1)
Switches
545(1)
Circuit Protection
546(1)
Fuses
546(1)
Circuit Breakers
547(1)
Testing Equipment
547(3)
Light Sources
550(17)
Incandescent Lamps
551(5)
Tungsten-Halogen Lamps
551(1)
Filaments
552(1)
Bulbs
553(2)
Lamp Bases and Sockets
555(1)
The Ansi Lamp Code
556(1)
Lamp Life
556(1)
Voltage
556(1)
Wattage and Lumen Output
557(1)
Color Temperature
557(1)
R-Type and Par Lamps
558(2)
R-Type Lamps
558(1)
PAR Lamps
559(1)
Low-Voltage Lamps
560(2)
Power Sources
561(1)
MR-11, MR-13, and MR-16 Lamps
561(1)
ARC Light
562(3)
Carbon Arc
563(1)
Modern Arc Lamps
563(2)
Gaseous Discharge Lamps
565(1)
Manufacturer Recommendations
566(1)
Stage-Lighting Practice: Design
567(27)
The Proscenium Theatre
567(7)
A Realistic Interior
567(1)
The Light Plot
568(6)
Arena Productions
574(6)
Special Considerations
574(3)
Designing the Lighting
577(3)
Thrust Productions
580(6)
The Theatre
580(1)
Design Considerations
581(1)
Designing the Lighting
582(3)
Variations
585(1)
The Flexible Stage
586(1)
Lighting for Dance
586(8)
Design Considerations
586(2)
Location of Instruments
588(1)
Booms
589(1)
Color Considerations
590(1)
Cues
591(1)
A Dance Plot
591(2)
Dance Design
593(1)
Lighting Design as a Profession
594(28)
Lighting on Broadway
594(8)
The Broadway Lighting Designer
594(1)
Designers at Work: Donald Holder
595(2)
Equipment in the Broadway Theatre
597(2)
Hiring Electricians
599(1)
The Production Period
599(1)
Moving the Show
600(2)
Designing for Regional Theatre
602(6)
Working in Regional Theatre
602(2)
Regional Theatre Production
604(1)
Designers at Work: Chris Parry
605(3)
Lighting for Opera
608(3)
Working as a Lighting Designer
611(11)
Architecture
611(1)
Designers at Work: Robert Shook
611(2)
Television and Film
613(1)
Designers at Work: Dennis Size
614(1)
Industrials and Trade Shows
615(1)
Designers at Work: Ann Archbold
616(1)
Themed Entertainment
617(1)
Designers at Work: Tom Ruzika
618(1)
Concerts
619(1)
The Theatre
620(2)
Glossary 622(11)
Additional Reading 633(4)
Index 637


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...