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The School and Community Relations,9780205412068
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The School and Community Relations

by ; ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780205412068

ISBN10:
0205412068
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $111.40
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Summary

Well researched and applied, this best-selling text provides school officials the "how" and the "why" for effective communication with their staff and the community to improve school quality and student learning. Chapters are sequenced so that the reader can learn how to establish a public/community relations program that will be effective with every audience a school administrator will encounter. The authors continue to teach, research and work extensively with school administrators and this experience allows them to provide sound advice that is field tested and successful.

Author Biography

Don Bagin coordinates the graduate programs in educational public relations and corporate public relations at Rowan University, where he is a professor of communications.

Table of Contents

PREFACE xi
ABOUT THE AUTHORS xiii
PART ONE: ESSENTIAL CONSIDERATIONS
CHAPTER 1 THE IMPORTANCE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
1(8)
Why School Public Relations?
1(2)
Suggestions for Improving Public Confidence
3(4)
Need for a Communication Plan
7(2)
CHAPTER 2 PUBLIC CHARACTER OF THE SCHOOL
9(7)
Public Character of the School
9(1)
The Meaning of Public Opinion
10(1)
School-Community Relations
11(2)
Models of Public Relations
13(3)
CHAPTER 3 UNDERSTANDING THE COMMUNITY
16(24)
Sociological Inventory
16(7)
Power Structures
23(3)
Measuring Public Opinion
26(11)
Electronic Surveying
37(3)
CHAPTER 4 POLICIES, GOALS, AND STRATEGIES
40(12)
Nature of a Policy
40(3)
Goals and Strategies
43(5)
Planning Checklist
48(4)
CHAPTER 5 ADMINISTERING THE PROGRAM
52(21)
The Board of Education
52(3)
The Superintendent's Role
55(2)
The Administrative Team
57(1)
Director of School-Community Relations
57(4)
Standards for Educational Public Relations Professionals
61(1)
Plans of Organization
62(2)
Responsibilities of Other Team Members
64(1)
Budgetary Provisions
64(1)
Staff Members
65(1)
General Community Relations Responsibilities
65(1)
Specific Community Relations Responsibilities
66(3)
In-Service Training
69(4)
PART TWO: RELATIONS WITH SPECIAL PUBLICS
CHAPTER 6 THE COMMUNICATION PROCESS
73(16)
Elements of Communication
76(1)
Communication and Persuasion
76(7)
Media's Role in Communication
83(2)
Words
85(1)
Crisis Communications
86(3)
CHAPTER 7 COMMUNICATING WITH INTERNAL PUBLICS
89(29)
Why Internal Communications?
89(1)
School Board Actions
89(2)
Administration-Employee Relations
91(2)
Relations among Teachers
93(2)
Relations with Noninstructional Personnel
95(1)
Improvement of Staff Relations
96(7)
Communicating during Negotiations and Strikes
103(4)
Communicating with Pupils
107(2)
Instructional Practices
109(1)
Relations Outside the Classroom
110(2)
The Pupil and Internal Community Relations
112(1)
Student Unrest
113(5)
CHAPTER 8 COMMUNICATING WITH EXTERNAL PUBLICS
118(42)
The Pupil and External Community Relations
118(5)
Community Relations Role of Teachers' Associations
123(4)
Importance of Parent Relations
127(7)
School Liaison Groups
134(3)
Key Communicators
137(1)
General Community Groups
138(5)
Older Adults and the School: An Intergenerational Public Relations Approach
143(3)
Opportunities for Cooperation
146(3)
Meeting Criticism and Attacks
149(6)
Communication during Negotiations and a Strike
155(2)
Communicating with Diverse Cultures
157(3)
CHAPTER 9 GETTING READY FOR A CRISIS
160(14)
A Crisis Plan Is Essential
160(2)
Why Is a Crisis Management Team Important?
162(1)
What Types of Crises Can We Expect?
162(1)
Where Do Acts of Violence Take Place?
163(1)
When Violence Strikes... What To Do
163(3)
Working with the Media
166(4)
Special Considerations
170(1)
Prevention...Your First and Best Strategy
171(1)
The Warning Signs
172(1)
The Aftermath
172(2)
CHAPTER 10 COMMUNICATION ABOUT SCHOOL SERVICES AND SPECIAL EVENTS
174(22)
Contacts with the Board of Education
174(2)
Receiving School Visitors
176(2)
Handling Telephone Calls and Correspondence
178(3)
Servicing Complaints
181(1)
Meeting Everyday Contacts
182(1)
Requests for Information
183(1)
Participation in Community Life
184(1)
School Plant Appearance
185(1)
Special Programs for Older People
186(1)
Open House
187(2)
Building Dedications
189(1)
American Education Week
190(1)
Business-Industry-Education Cooperation
190(1)
Community Use of School Facilities
191(1)
Adult Education
192(2)
Community Education
194(2)
PART THREE: COMMUNICATION TOOLS
CHAPTER 11 WORKING WITH THE PRESS
196(30)
Guidelines
197(4)
The Role of Reporters
201(2)
The Press and School Board Meetings
203(2)
The News Conference
205(1)
Drafting a News Relations Plan
206(1)
What People Want to Know about the Schools
206(1)
Foreign-Language Newspapers
206(1)
News Topics in Your Schools
207(4)
Types of Stories
211(4)
News Sources
215(2)
News Organizations
217(3)
Getting the News to the Press
220(3)
Mechanics of the News Release
223(1)
Other Methods
223(3)
CHAPTER 12 RADIO, TELEVISION, EXHIBITS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS
226(17)
Using Radio
226(5)
Writing for Radio
231(1)
Working with Radio Personnel
232(1)
Television Opportunities
232(1)
Getting Television Time
232(1)
Planning for Effective Television
233(2)
School Exhibits
235(4)
Movies and Videos
239(2)
Other Options
241(2)
CHAPTER 13 SCHOOLS AND THE INTERNET
243(9)
Study Technology's Past Impact
243(1)
Apply Yesterday's Lessons
244(1)
Forget the Gee-Whiz Factor
244(1)
Consider the New-Media Mix
244(1)
Focus on Relevancy
245(1)
Listen to Your New-Media Customers
245(1)
Create New Worlds: The Snaring and Feeding of New-Media Customers
246(1)
Tap the Power of Digital Face to Face
246(1)
Deal with the New World of Communication Chaos
246(1)
Prepare for the Unexpected
247(1)
Expect Grassroots Involvement
247(2)
Understand the User's Power
249(1)
Take Advantage of New Developments
249(1)
Follow These Tips
250(2)
CHAPTER 14 PREPARING PUBLISHED MATERIALS
252(28)
Objectives and School Publications
252(1)
Knowing the Audience
253(1)
Choosing Content
254(1)
Determining Who Should Write the Publications
254(1)
Knowing How to Publish It
254(1)
Priorities for Traditional Printing
255(2)
Saving Money on Printing Costs
257(2)
Designing and Laying Out the Publication
259(3)
Getting the Most Out of Typography
262(2)
Using Photos to Enhance Publications
264(1)
Distributing Publications
264(4)
Evaluating School Publications
268(1)
Deciding Which Publications to Print
268(4)
The Role of Student Publications
272(8)
CHAPTER 15 CONDUCTING CAMPAIGNS
280(35)
How a Community Accepts a New Idea
280(1)
The Change Agent
281(1)
How People Accept Change
282(1)
Introducing an Innovation
283(1)
School Finance Elections
284(1)
What the Research Says
284(3)
Planning the Campaign
287(1)
Determining the Proposal
288(1)
Establishing a Philosophy
288(1)
Naming a Campaign Director
289(1)
Timing of the Campaign
289(1)
Financing the Campaign
289(1)
Citizens' Advisory Committee
290(1)
Registration of Voters
291(1)
Other Campaign Participants
291(2)
Knowing the Community's Thinking before the Election
293(1)
Adopting a Theme or Slogan
294(1)
Personalizing the Campaign
294(1)
Keep It Simple
295(1)
Working with the Media
295(1)
Publications Can Help
296(1)
Speakers' Bureau
296(1)
Endorsements
297(1)
Small-Group Meetings
297(1)
House-to-House Canvass
297(1)
Absentee Ballots
298(1)
Election-Day Plans
298(1)
Campaign Timetable
298(2)
Recommendations to Improve Election-Day Results
300(1)
A New Jersey Example of a Campaign
301(9)
A Nevada Example of a Campaign
310(5)
CHAPTER 16 SCHOOL PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE SCHOOL CHOICE CHALLENGE
315(9)
What Are the Challenges?
315(1)
Counteracting a Competitor's Marketing Plan
316(1)
Questions to Address
317(3)
Statements a Competitor Might Use to Attract Students
320(1)
Suggestions to Get People to Choose Your Schools
321(1)
How Memphis Told Its School Story
321(3)
PART FOUR: EVALUATION
CHAPTER 17 ASSESSMENT OF THE PROGRAM
324(16)
Scope of Assessment
324(1)
Myths about Measurements
324(1)
Importance of Evaluation to a Public Relations Plan
325(1)
Approaches to Evaluation
326(4)
Appraising the Results
330(10)
APPENDIX A ORGANIZATIONS THAT COULD BE HELPFUL 340(3)
INDEX 343


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