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School and Society : Historical and Contemporary Perspectives with PowerWeb,9780072546378
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School and Society : Historical and Contemporary Perspectives with PowerWeb

by ; ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780072546378

ISBN10:
0072546379
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/24/2001
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
List Price: $109.35
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Summary

A core text for the Foundations course, School and Society provides an analytic framework that shows how and why certain school-society issues first arose in this country and how they changed over time. In its examination of the evolution of education in the United States, this book tells an engaging historical story. The text’s analytical framework focuses on the political economy, dominant ideology, and existing educational practices that are prevalent in any one historical era. Chapter 1 explains and illustrates this framework in detail. Readings at the end of each chapter, are designed for the student to critique using the same analytic framework as the authors employ in the text. This edition adds a new Chapter 15 to wrap things up and look to the future and new material on youth culture, teacher assessment tests (PRAXIS, subject area exams, portfolio assessment), recent legal issues, technology in education, parent-teacher relations, and cultural awareness and respect. In addition to a new, more open design and updated photos, the revision incorporates for the first time specific pedagogical elements designed to help students. These new pedagogical elements include Chapter Overviews, Chapter Objectives, Timelines, Developing Your Professional Vocabulary, Thinking Critically About the Issues, and Web Sites of Interest.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
part one Educational Aims in Historical Perspective 1(242)
Introduction: Understanding School and Society
2(16)
Introduction: Conducting Inquiry into School and Society
4(1)
The Place of Social Foundations in Teacher Education
4(2)
The Meaning of Democracy in Educational Practice
5(1)
Education of Diverse Students
5(1)
Tools of Inquiry
6(4)
Social Theory
6(1)
Schooling
7(1)
Training
7(1)
Education
7(1)
Political Economy
8(1)
Ideology
9(1)
Analytic Framework
10(1)
Applying the Terms of Inquiry: Two Illustrations
11(5)
European Feudal Society and Education
11(1)
Schooling and Culture in Classical Greece
12(4)
Concluding Remarks
16(1)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
16(1)
Using the World Wide Web
17(1)
Liberty and Literacy: The Jeffersonian Era
18(30)
Introduction: Why Jefferson?
20(1)
Political Economy of the Jeffersonian Era
20(3)
Geography, Transportation, and Communication
20(2)
The Family and Agrarian Society
22(1)
Early American Governance
23(1)
Ideology of the Jeffersonian Era
23(11)
The Breakdown of Feudalism
24(1)
The Classical Roots of Liberal Ideology
24(5)
Jefferson as Classical Liberal
29(1)
Jefferson and Intellectual Freedom
29(2)
Jefferson, Democracy, and Education
31(1)
Jefferson as Realist
32(1)
Government by a ``Natural Aristocracy''
33(1)
Jefferson's Plan for Popular Education
34(7)
Elementary School Districts
34(2)
Grammar Schools
36(1)
University Education
36(1)
Self-Education
37(1)
Educational Method and ``Faculty Psychology''
38(1)
Jefferson's Views on Slavery, Native Americans, and Women
39(2)
Concluding Remarks
41(4)
Primary Source Reading: Thoughts upon the Mode of Education Proper in a Republic
43(2)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
45(1)
Using the World Wide Web
46(2)
School as a Public Institution: The Common-School Era
48(34)
Introduction: Schooling in New England
50(1)
Political Economy of the Common-School Era
50(4)
Demographic Changes
50(2)
Political Developments
52(1)
Economic Developments
52(2)
Ideology and Religion
54(2)
Consolidation of Classical Liberalism
55(1)
Horace Mann: An Exemplar of Reform
56(3)
Early Life
56(1)
Mann's Education
57(1)
Mann's Political Career
57(2)
Mann and the Common Schools
59(15)
School Buildings
60(1)
Moral Values
61(1)
Lessons from the Prussian School System
62(2)
School Discipline
64(2)
The Quality of Teachers
66(3)
The Economic Value of Schooling
69(2)
Opposition to Mann's Common-School Reforms
71(2)
Accounting for the Success of the Common-School Reforms
73(1)
Lessons from Horace Mann's Common-School Reforms
73(1)
Concluding Remarks
74(6)
Primary Source Reading: Decentralization: Alternative to Bureaucracy?
76(4)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
80(1)
Using the World Wide Web
80(2)
Social Diversity and Differentiated Schooling: The Progressive Era
82(40)
Introduction: ``Traditional'' versus ``Progressive'' Education
84(1)
The Political Economy of the Progressive Era
85(15)
Urbanization
85(1)
Immigration
86(2)
Industrialization
88(4)
Worker Responses to Industrial Management
92(8)
New Liberal Ideology
100(5)
Natural Law
101(1)
Scientific Rationality
101(1)
From Virtue to Rational Ethics
101(1)
Progress
101(1)
Nationalism
102(1)
Freedom
102(3)
Progressive Education
105(2)
Two Strands of Progressivism: Developmental Democracy and Social Efficiency
106(1)
Deweyan Developmental Democracy
107(9)
The Nature of the Child
108(1)
A Unique Meaning for Progressive Education
109(1)
Charles W. Eliot and Social Efficiency
110(6)
Concluding Remarks
116(4)
Primary Source Reading: Report of the Committee on the Place of Industries in Public Education
117(3)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
120(1)
Using the World Wide Web
120(2)
Diversity and Equity: Schooling Girls and Women
122(30)
Introduction: Why a Separate Chapter on Females?
124(1)
Ideological Origins in Early Christianity
124(1)
Gender and Education in Colonial America
125(4)
Private Schools
127(1)
The Revolution and the Cult of Domesticity
128(1)
Competing Ideological Perspectives in the Nineteenth Century
129(3)
The Conservative and Liberal Positions
129(2)
The Radical Position
131(1)
Ideology and Life: Emma Willard
132(4)
A New Vision for Women's Education
133(1)
The Troy Female Seminary
134(2)
Higher Education for Women
136(4)
Academies
136(1)
Normal Schools
137(1)
High Schools
138(1)
Colleges
139(1)
Women and Vocational Education
140(4)
Domestic Science Training
140(2)
Commercial Education
142(2)
Concluding Remarks
144(7)
Primary Source Reading: Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions
145(2)
Primary Source Reading: The Education of the Girl
147(4)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
151(1)
Using the World Wide Web
151(1)
Diversity and Equity: Schooling and African-Americans
152(36)
Introduction: Common Schools in the South
154(1)
Political-Economic Dimensions of Reconstruction and Redemption
154(1)
Redemption
155(1)
Reconstruction, Redemption, and African-American Schooling
155(8)
Schooling in the Black Belt
156(7)
Booker T. Washington's Career
163(4)
Washington and Schooling in the Black Belt
164(3)
An Ideology of African-American Inferiority
167(7)
A Liberal Justification for Racial Oppression: Darwinian Evolution
167(2)
Avoiding the Issue of Political Power
169(1)
A Liberal Faith: Social Progress through the Marketplace
170(2)
The Washington Solution
172(2)
William Edward Burghardt Du Bois
174(3)
Concluding Remarks
177(9)
Primary Source Reading: Atlanta Exposition Address of 1895
179(2)
Primary Source Reading: Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others
181(5)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
186(1)
Using the World Wide Web
187(1)
Diversity and Equity: Schooling and American Indians
188(30)
Political-Economic Foundations of Indian Schooling
191(2)
A World before Europeans
191(1)
Treaties and the ``Trust Relationship''
192(1)
Ideology
193(3)
Traditional Knowledge versus Science and Progress
194(2)
Schooling the Native American
196(11)
Social Education, from Land Allotment to Boarding Schools
196(1)
Criticism of the Boarding School
196(1)
Scientific Management and Educational Reform
197(1)
``Progressive'' Indian Education: Early Years
198(1)
The Influence of John Collier
199(1)
Collier's Early Career
200(1)
Collier as Commissioner of Indian Affairs
201(3)
Willard Walcott Beatty: Progressive Education for Native Americans
204(2)
Schooling and Assimilation of the Indian Child
206(1)
Afterword: The Case of the Navajo
207(2)
Concluding Remarks
209(7)
Primary Source Reading: The Hopi Way (1944)
210(1)
Primary Source Reading: Statements by Three American Indian Educators
211(5)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
216(1)
Using the World Wide Web
216(2)
National School Reform: The Early Cold War Era
218(25)
Introduction: The Best and Brightest...
220(1)
Political Economy and Ideology of the Early Cold War Era
220(5)
U.S. Fear of Soviet Communism
221(1)
New Liberal Ideology in the Cold War Era
222(3)
James Bryant Conant
225(13)
Standardized Testing and Student Selection
226(1)
Who Merits a College Education?
227(1)
School Reform Reports and Social Stratification
228(1)
Education in a Divided World
229(1)
School Reform in the Postwar Era
230(2)
The Great Talent Hunt
232(3)
Slums and Subversives
235(3)
Concluding Remarks
238(4)
Primary Source Reading: Excerpts from ``Education for All''
240(2)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
242(1)
Using the World Wide Web
242(1)
part two Educational Aims in Contemporary Society 243(261)
Liberty and Literacy Today: Contemporary Perspectives
244(40)
Introduction: Revisiting Literacy
246(1)
A Brief Historical Perspective
246(1)
Literacy as a Social Construction
247(1)
Four Contemporary Perspectives on Literacy
248(15)
Conventional Literacy
248(1)
Functional Literacy
249(3)
Cultural Literacy
252(6)
Critical Literacy
258(5)
Hegemony Theory: Literacy and Ideology
263(12)
Mass Media and Cultural Hegemony
265(5)
Communications Technologies: From Jefferson's ``Free Marketplace of Ideas'' to the ``Information Marketplace''
270(2)
Schooling and Cultural Hegemony
272(3)
Concluding Remarks
275(7)
Primary Source Reading: Inside the Classroom: Social Vision and Critical Pedagogy
276(6)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
282(1)
Using the World Wide Web
283(1)
Teaching in a Public Institution: The Professionalization Movement
284(44)
Introduction: Remembering Horace Mann
286(1)
Professionalization of Teaching: Historical Perspective
286(3)
Common-School Reform
286(1)
Progressive Era Reform
287(1)
Conant Era Reform
288(1)
Professionalism and Contemporary School Reform
289(5)
Comparing Teaching to Other Professions
290(1)
Professionalism and Modern Liberal Ideology
290(1)
Traditional Criteria for the Professions
291(1)
Professionalization and Teacher Preparation
292(1)
Teacher Preparation and Career Ladders
293(1)
Teaching as a Public Profession
294(5)
Teaching as a Distinctive Profession
295(1)
Political-Economic Dimensions of Teaching as a Public Profession
295(4)
Public Control versus Professional Autonomy
299(17)
The Limitations on Teacher Decision Making
300(1)
Who Controls the Schools?
301(1)
Legal Control Structure
302(2)
Who Controls the Schools? The Role of the U.S. Supreme Court
304(10)
Who Controls the Schools? Extralegal Influences
314(2)
Professional Satisfaction and Professional Ethics
316(2)
Democratic Ethics and the Profession of Teaching
317(1)
Concluding Remarks
318(9)
Primary Source Reading: What Matters Most: Teaching for America's Future
319(8)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
327(1)
Using the World Wide Web
327(1)
Social Diversity and Differentiated Schooling Today: Vocational and Liberal Ideals
328(36)
Introduction: The Purposes of Schooling
328(3)
Vocational Education in Historical Perspective
331(6)
Prior to Perkins: Vocational Education in the 1970s and 1980s
332(1)
The Decline of Enrollment in Vocational Programs
333(2)
Community Colleges and Vocational Education
335(2)
The Perkins Act Amendments of 1990 and 1998
337(1)
The Future of the Workplace
337(6)
Future Jobs
337(3)
Educating for the Workplace
340(1)
Income and Benefits
341(1)
Work and the Quality of Life
342(1)
Vocational Education as a Teaching Method
343(3)
The Meaning of a Liberal Education
346(8)
Historical Perspectives
346(1)
Liberal Education in America
347(7)
Concluding Remarks
354(8)
Primary Source Reading: Getting off Track: The Challenge and Potential of the Mixed Ability Classroom
355(7)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
362(1)
Using the World Wide Web
363(1)
Diversity and Equity Today: Defining the Challenge
364(40)
Introduction: Inequity and Inequality
366(1)
Liberal Ideology: Meritocracy Reexamined
366(4)
Social Conditions behind the New Debate
366(2)
The Coleman Report
368(1)
The Cultural Deprivation Studies
369(1)
The Political-Economic Context
370(10)
The Demographics of Modern American Society
370(1)
Race, Ethnicity, and the Limits of Language
370(6)
Gender
376(2)
Socioeconomic Class
378(2)
Education: Ethnicity, Gender, and Class
380(16)
Race, Ethnicity, and Education
380(5)
Socioeconomic Class and Education
385(4)
Equity, Education, and Handicapping Conditions
389(1)
Gender and Education
390(1)
Societal Definitions of Gender
390(6)
Concluding Remarks
396(6)
Primary Source Reading: Introduction to How the Irish Became White
398(1)
Primary Source Reading: An Indian Father's Plea
399(3)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
402(1)
Using the World Wide Web
402(2)
Diversity and Equity Today: Meeting the Challenge
404(38)
Introduction: Does Social Inequality Necessarily Determine Educational Outcomes?
406(1)
Jane Elliott's Experiment
406(2)
Theories of Social Inequality
408(12)
Genetic Inferiority Theory
409(1)
Cultural Deficit Theory
410(1)
Critical Theory
411(6)
A Useful Digression: Bilingual and ESL Instruction as Bridges to English Proficiency
417(1)
BEV: Language and Cultural Subordination
418(2)
Pedagogical Approaches to Pluralism
420(10)
Gender Theory: An Illustration of Sensitivity to Differences
420(3)
Multicultural Education and Democratic Pluralism
423(1)
Programs That Work
424(6)
Diversity, Equity, and Special Education
430(1)
Concluding Remarks
431(9)
Primary Source Reading: Taking Multicultural, Antiracist Education Seriously: An Interview with Educator Enid Lee
433(3)
Primary Source Reading: Bilingual Education Program Models: A Framework for Understanding
436(4)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
440(1)
Using the World Wide Web
440(2)
Contemporary School Reform: The Post-Cold War Era
442(36)
Introduction: Social Changes and School Reform
444(1)
School Reform in the 1980s and 1990s
444(11)
Contemporary School Reform: Its Languages and Themes
445(2)
Schooling as a Response to New Social and Economic Conditions
447(1)
The New Consensus on Excellence in Education
447(5)
Restructuring
452(1)
Changes Brought by the Early Stages of the Contemporary Reform Movement
453(2)
Contemporary School Reform: A Critical View
455(5)
The Political-Economic Origins of the Contemporary School Reform Movement
455(3)
The Ideology of Contemporary School Reform
458(2)
Current Concerns about School Reform
460(3)
Teachers' Voices
460(1)
Whose Needs Are Being Met?
461(2)
School Reform in a New Century
463(9)
School Reform Today: New and Continuing Initiatives
465(1)
School Choice, Vouchers, and Charters
466(1)
Standards-Based Professional Preparation and Development of Teachers
467(5)
Concluding Remarks
472(5)
Primary Source Reading: Why Johnny Can't Think
474(3)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
477(1)
Using the World Wide Web
477(1)
The Cultural Contexts of Children and Youth
478(26)
Introduction: The Student's Multiple Cultural Contexts
480(1)
Three Perspectives on Youth Culture
481(2)
Educational Significance of Perspectives on Youth Culture
482(1)
A Low-Income Latino Community as the Cultural Context
483(3)
Finding 1: The Hope of College Matriculation and the Compensation of Family
483(1)
Finding 2: Expected and Feared Selves: The Limits of Familial Knowledge
484(1)
Finding 3: Students' Future Concepts and the School's Limited Influence
485(1)
Families
486(10)
Why Does It Matter?
487(1)
What Constitutes Parental Involvement?
488(1)
Types of Involvement: Schoolwide and in the Classroom
489(1)
Epstein's Typology of Involvement
489(7)
Barriers to Effective Parent-Teacher Collaboration
496(3)
Practical Concerns: Too Many Students, Not Enough Teacher Know-How
496(1)
Cultural and Class Barriers
497(1)
Psychological Expectations and Impediments
498(1)
The Disconnect from ``Democratic Responsibility''
498(1)
Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions of Effective Teachers
499(1)
Concluding Remarks
500(3)
Primary Source Reading: The New MTV: Be Afraid
501(2)
Questions for Discussion and Examination
503(1)
Using the World Wide Web
503(1)
Notes 504(23)
Glossary 527(8)
Photo Credits 535(2)
Index 537


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