9780915144860

Second Treatise on Civil Government

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780915144860

  • ISBN10:

    0915144867

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 6/1/1980
  • Publisher: Hackett Pub Co Inc

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Summary

The central principles of what today is broadly known as political liberalism were made current in large part by Locke's "Second Treatise of Government" (1690). The principles of individual liberty, the rule of law, government by consent of the people, and the right to private property are taken for granted as fundamental to the human condition now. Most liberal theorists writing today look back to Locke as the source of their ideas. Some maintain that religious fundamentalism, "post-modernism," and socialism are today the only remaining ideological threats to liberalism. To the extent that this is true, these ideologies are ultimately attacks on the ideas that Locke, arguably more than any other, helped to make the universal vocabulary of political discourse.

Table of Contents

Editor's Introduction vii(16)
Bibliography xxiii
A Note on the Text 1(1)
Title pages of the Two Treatises 2-3(1)
1764 Editor's Note 4(1)
Locke's Preface to the Two Treatises 5(2)
THE SECOND TREATISE 7
Chapter I
7(1)
II Of the State of Nature
8(6)
III Of the State of War
14(3)
IV Of Slavery
17(1)
V Of Property
18(12)
VI Of Paternal Power
30(12)
VII Of Political or Civil Society
42(10)
VIII Of the Beginning of Political Societies
52(13)
IX Of the Ends of Political Society and Government
65(3)
X Of the Forms of a Common-wealth
68(1)
XI Of the Extent of the Legislative Power
69(6)
XII Of the Legislative, Executive, and Federative Power of the Common-wealth
75(2)
XIII Of the Subordination of the Powers of the Common-wealth
77(6)
XIV Of Prerogative
83(5)
XV Of Paternal, Political, and Despotical Power, considered together
88(3)
XVI Of Conquest
91(9)
XVII Of Usurpation
100(1)
XVIII Of Tyranny
101(6)
XIX Of the Dissolution of Government
107

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