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Seeing Ourselves : Classic, Contemporary, and Cross-Cultural Readings in Sociology

by ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780132204910

ISBN10:
0132204916
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

This best-selling collection is the only reader that systematically weaves together three types of articles classic, contemporary,and cross-cultural for each general topic typically covered in a sociology course.Seeing Ourselvesconveys sociology's diversity of viewpoints and methodologies and includes important issues and debates that capture the fascinating complexity of the social world.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
About the Editors xxi
The Sociological Imagination
Classic
``The Sociological Imagination''
1(5)
C. Wright Mills
Classic
``Invitation to Sociology''
6(4)
Peter L. Berger
Contemporary
``Teenage Wasteland''
10(4)
Donna Gaines
Contemporary
``Women and the Birth of Sociology''
14(5)
Patricia Madoo Lengermann
Jill Niebrugge-Brantley
Cross-Cultural
``Body Ritual among the Nacirema''
19(4)
Horace Miner
Sociological Research
Classic
``The Case for Value-Free Sociology''
23(2)
Max Weber
Contemporary
``The Importance of Social Research''
25(3)
Earl Babbie
Cross-Cultural
``Arab Women in the Field''
28(7)
Soraya Altorki
Culture
Classic
``Symbol: The Basic Element of Culture''
35(5)
Leslie A. White
Classic
``Manifest and Latent Functions''
40(2)
Robert K. Merton
Contemporary
``Cultural Obsessions with Thinness: African American, Latina, and White Women''
42(9)
Becky W. Thompson
Cross-Cultural
``India's Sacred Cow''
51(4)
Marvin Harris
Society
Classic
``Manifesto of the Communist Party''
55(8)
Karl Marx
Friedrich Engels
Classic
``Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft''
63(3)
Ferdinand Tonnies
Contemporary
``Unmarried with Children''
66(6)
Kathryn Edin
Maria Kefalas
Cross-Cultural
``The Amish: A Small Society''
72(3)
John A. Hostetler
Socialization
Classic
``The Self''
75(8)
George Herbert Mead
Contemporary
``Boyhood, Organized Sports, and the Construction of Masculinities''
83(12)
Michael A. Messner
Contemporary
``Socialization and the Power of Advertising''
95(6)
Jean Kilbourne
Cross-Cultural
``Parents' Socialization of Children in Global Perspective''
101(5)
D. Terri Heath
Social Interaction in Everyday Life
Classic
``The Dyad and the Triad''
106(2)
Georg Simmel
Classic
``The Presentation of Self''
108(6)
Erving Goffman
Contemporary
``Invisible Privilege''
114(4)
Paula S. Rothenberg
Contemporary
``You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation''
118(6)
Deborah Tannen
Cross-Cultural
``The DOs and TABOOs of Body Language around the World''
124(6)
Roger E. Axtell
Groups and Organizations
Classic
``Primary Groups''
130(4)
Charles Horton Cooley
Classic
``The Characteristics of Bureaucracy''
134(4)
Max Weber
Contemporary
``McJobs: McDonaldization and the Workplace''
138(5)
George Ritzer
Cross-Cultural
``'Even If I Don't Know What I'm Doing, I Can Make It Look Like I Do': Becoming a Doctor in Canada''
143(11)
Brenda L. Beagan
Deviance
Classic
``The Functions of Crime''
154(3)
Emile Durkheim
Contemporary
``On Being Sane in Insane Places''
157(13)
David L. Rosenhan
Cross-Cultural
``The Code of the Streets''
170(10)
Elijah Anderson
Cross-Cultural
``Prostitution: A Worldwide Business of Sexual Exploitation''
180(14)
Melissa Farley
Sexuality
Classic
``Understanding Sexual Orientation''
194(3)
Alfred C. Kinsey
Wardell B. Pomeroy
Clyde E. Martin
Contemporary
``Sex in America: How Many Partners Do We Have?''
197(7)
Robert T. Michael
John H. Gagnon
Edward O. Laumann
Gina Kolata
Cross-Cultural
``Homosexual Behavior in Cross-Cultural Perspective''
204(11)
J. M. Carrier
Social Stratification
Classic
``Some Principles of Stratification''
215(8)
Kingsley Davis
Wilbert Moore
Melvin Tumin
Contemporary
``Who Has How Much and Why''
223(6)
Andrew Hacker
Cross-Cultural
``The Uses of Global Poverty: How Economic Inequality Benefits the West''
229(8)
Daina Stukuls Eglitis
Gender
Classic
``Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies''
237(6)
Margaret Mead
Contemporary
``'Night to His Day': The Social Construction of Gender''
243(6)
Judith Lorber
Contemporary
``How Subtle Sex Discrimination Works''
249(6)
Nijole V. Benokraitis
Cross-Cultural
``Domestic Violence: A Cross-Cultural View''
255(6)
Elaine Leeder
Race and Ethnicity
Classic
``The Souls of Black Folk''
261(5)
W.E.B. DuBois
Contemporary
``Controlling Images and Black Women's Oppression''
266(8)
Patricia Hill Collins
Contemporary
``How Did Jews Become White Folks?''
274(10)
Karen B. Brodkin
Cross-Cultural
``Out of Harmony: Health Problems and Young Native American Men''
284(9)
Jennie R. Joe
Aging and the Elderly
Classic
``The Tragedy of Old Age in America''
293(6)
Robert N. Butler
Contemporary
``How the Grandparent Role Is Changing''
299(9)
Roseann Giarrusso
Merril Silverstein
Vern L. Bengston
Cross-Cultural
``Our Aging World''
308(4)
Frank B. Hobbs
Bonnie L. Damon
The Economy and Work
Classic
``Alienated Labor''
312(4)
Karl Marx
Contemporary
``When Work Disappears''
316(10)
William Julius Wilson
Cross-Cultural
``Getting a Job in Harlem: Experiences of African American, Puerto Rican, and Dominican Youth''
326(9)
Katherine S. Newman
Politics, Government, and the Military
Classic
``The Power Elite''
335(7)
C. Wright Mills
Contemporary
``Who's Running America?''
342(7)
Thomas R. Dye
Cross-Cultural
``The Roots of Terrorism'' from The 9/11 Commission Report
349(7)
Family
Classic
`` `His' and `Her' Marriage''
356(6)
Jessie Bernard
Contemporary
``The Mommy Myth''
362(6)
Susan J. Douglas
Meredith W. Michaels
Cross-Cultural
``Mate Selection and Marriage around the World''
368(7)
Bron B. Ingoldsby
Religion
Classic
``The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism''
375(6)
Max Weber
Contemporary
``How Student Life Is Different at Religious Colleges''
381(6)
Naomi Schaefer Riley
Cross-Cultural
``Women and Islam''
387(7)
Jane I. Smith
Education
Classic
``Education and Inequality''
394(7)
Samuel Bowles
Herbert Gintis
Contemporary
``Savage Inequalities: Children in U.S. Schools''
401(6)
Jonathan Kozol
Cross-Cultural
``Japanese Mothers as the Best Teachers''
407(9)
Keiko Hirao
Health and Medicine
Classic
``The Social Structure of Medicine''
416(4)
Talcott Parsons
Contemporary
``The Slaughterhouse: The Most Dangerous Job''
420(5)
Eric Schlosser
Cross-Cultural
``Female Genital Mutilation''
425(8)
Efua Dorkenoo
Scilla Elworthy
Population and Urbanization
Classic
``The Metropolis and Mental Life''
433(7)
Georg Simmel
Classic
``Urbanism as a Way of Life''
440(6)
Louis Wirth
Contemporary
``Urban Sprawl: The Formation of Edge Cities''
446(5)
John J. Macionis
Vincent N. Parrillo
Cross-Cultural
``Let's Reduce Global Population!''
451(5)
J. Kenneth Smail
Environment and Society
Classic
``Why Humanity Faces Ultimate Catastrophe''
456(4)
Thomas Robert Malthus
Contemporary
``Rich Planet, Poor Planet: Global Environment and Poverty in 2001''
460(12)
Christopher Flavin
Cross-Cultural
``Supporting Indigenous Peoples''
472(8)
Alan Thein Durning
Collective Behavior and Social Movements
Classic
``On the Origins of Social Movements''
480(13)
Jo Freeman
Contemporary
``The Animal Rights Movement as a Moral Crusade''
493(7)
James M. Jasper
Dorothy Nelkin
Cross-Cultural
``Abortion Movements in Poland, Great Britain, and the United States''
500(10)
Janet Hadley
Social Change and Modernity
Classic
``Anomy and Modern Life''
510(5)
Emile Durkheim
Classic
``The Disenchantment of Modern Life''
515(2)
Max Weber
Contemporary
``The American Paradox: Spiritual Hunger in an Age of Plenty''
517(5)
David G. Myers
Cross-Cultural
``The Price of Modernization: The Case of Brazil's Kaiapo Indians''
522(7)
Marlise Simons
Photo Credits 529

Excerpts

PREFACE If there is a college course that is more exciting for students than the introduction to sociology, we don't know what it is. Both of us began our careers as students taking the "intro course," and we both found it to be life-changing. Over the (many) years since then, we have received thousands of e-mail messages from students that, in different ways and using different words, say pretty much the same thing: "Sociology has given me a new way to see the world around me, it has changed the way I think about myself and our society, it has given me knowledge and skills that I can use every day." Why is sociology so exciting? First, understanding how society operates is a source of power, helping us to recognize the opportunities and challenges that frame our lives and to see that society is a human creation that is subject to change. Second, sociology is liberating. It frees us from the belief that we alone are responsible for our life situations and, by showing how society shapes our world, opens the door to new possibilities. Third, sociology is plain fun. Looking at our families, workplaces, campuses, and local communities with a sociological eye, we suddenly recognize patterns and processes that were always there but went unnoticed. To learn to see sociologically is to have the world around you come alive as it never has before. What could be more fun than that? Sociology is also a vast and diverse body of knowledge that stretches back more than 150 years. Seeing Ourselves: Classic, Contemporary, and Cross-Cultural Readings in Sociology captures this rich legacy, presenting it to readers in the words of the men and women who created it. This collection of readings contains the work of the discipline's founders and others who have made lasting contributions. In addition, it contains important research being done by women and men who are standing on the shoulders of the founders. Finally, it deepens our understanding of our own way of life by making comparisons with other societies and cultural systems. This reader provides excellent material for use in a wide range of courses. Seeing Ourselves is most widely used in introductory sociology, but it is also well suited for courses in social problems, cultural anthropology, social theory, social stratification, American studies, women's studies, and marriage and the family. Since its introduction a decade ago, Seeing Ourselves has been the most popular reader in the discipline. This seventh edition offers eighty-three readings that represent the widest range of material found in any similar text. In short, Seeing Ourselves gives instructors the largest selection of articles to consider for their courses. It also give students the best value for their textbook dollar, costing less per article than competing readers and "custom" readers. THE THREE C'S: CLASSIC, CONTEMPORARY, AND CROSS-CULTURAL Seeing Ourselves is the only reader that systematically weaves together three types of selections. For each general topic typically covered in a sociology course, three types of articles are included: classic, contemporary, and cross-cultural. Classic articlesthirty in allare sociological statements of recognized importance and lasting significance. Included here are the ideas of sociology's founders and shakers--including Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, Ferdinand Tönnies, as well as Margaret Mead, W. E. B. Du Bois, Louis Wirth, George Herbert Mead, Thomas Robert Malthus, and Charles Horton Cooley. There are also many more recent contributions by Alfred Kinsey, Jessie Bernard, Robert Merton, Erving Goffman, Peter Berger, Kingsley Davis and Wilbert Moore, C. Wright Mills, Talcott Parsons, Leslie White, and Jo Freeman. We realize that not everyone will agree about precisely which selections should be called "classics." But we hope that instructors will be pleased to see the work of so many outstanding men and womenc


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