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Sequence for Academic Writing, A,9780321456816

Sequence for Academic Writing, A

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780321456816

ISBN10:
0321456815
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $61.20

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Summary

A Sequence for Academic Writing focuses on the key strategies that any academic writer needs to know -- summary, synthesis, analysis, and critique. Practical advice for academic writing Summary, synthesis, analysis, and critique General Interest, Improving Writing

Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors xv
Note to the Student xix
PART ONE: STRUCTURES
Chapter 1 Summary, Paraphrase, and Quotation
3(50)
What Is a Summary?
3(1)
Can a Summary Be Objective?
3(1)
Using the Summary
4(1)
The Reading Process
5(3)
How to Write Summaries
8(1)
Demonstration: Summary
9(12)
The Future of Love: Kiss Romance Goodbye, It's Time for the Real Thing
9(12)
Barbara Graham
Read, Reread, Underline
12(1)
Divide into Stages of Thought
14(1)
Write a One- or Two-Sentence Summary of Each Stage of Thought
15(1)
Write a Thesis: A One- or Two-Sentence Summary of the Entire Passage
16(1)
Write the First Draft of the Summary
18(1)
Summary 1: Combine Thesis Sentence with One-Sentence Section Summaries
18(1)
Summary 2: Combine Thesis Sentence, Section Summaries, and Carefully Chosen Details
19(2)
Summarizing a Narrative or Personal Essay
21(7)
Dreams of Patagonia
22(16)
Bruce Chatwin
Summarizing Figures and Tables
28(4)
Paraphrase
32(6)
Quotations
38(4)
Choosing Quotations
38(4)
Quoting Memorable Language
38(2)
Quoting Clear and Concise Language
40(1)
Quoting Authoritative Language
40(2)
Incorporating Quotations into Your Sentences
42(1)
Quoting Only the Part of a Sentence or Paragraph That You Need
42(6)
Incorporating the Quotation into the Flow of Your Own Sentence
43(1)
Avoiding Freestanding Quotations
43(1)
Using Ellipses
44(1)
Using Brackets to Add or Substitute Words
45(3)
Avoiding Plagiarism
48(2)
Writing Assignment: Summary
50(3)
The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
50(3)
Doris Kearns Goodwin
Chapter 2 Critical Reading and Critique
53(28)
Critical Reading
53(15)
Question 1: To What Extent Does the Author Succeed in His or Her Purpose?
53(1)
Writing to Inform
54(1)
Evaluating Informative Writing
55(1)
Writing to Persuade
55(2)
Evaluating Persuasive Writing
57(1)
We Are Not Created Equal in Every WayóJoan Ryan
57(8)
Persuasive Strategies
58(2)
Logical Argumentation: Avoiding Logical Fallacies
60(5)
Writing to Entertain
65(1)
Question 2: To What Extent Do You Agree with the Author?
65(3)
Identify Points of Agreement and Disagreement
66(1)
Explore the Reasons for Agreement and Disagreement: Evaluate Assumptions
66(2)
Critique
68(1)
How to Write Critiques
69(1)
Demonstration: Critique
69(9)
To What Extent Does the Author Succeed in His or Her Purpose?
71(1)
To What Extent Do You Agree or Disagree with the Author? Evaluate Assumptions
71(1)
Model Critique: A Critique of "We Are Not Created Equal in Every Way" by Joan RyanóEric Ralston
72(5)
Discussion
77(1)
Writing Assignment: Critique
78(3)
With No Boys to Ogle, We Had Time to LearnóChristine Flowers
79(2)
Chapter 3 Explanatory Synthesis
81(47)
What Is a Synthesis?
81(1)
Purpose
82(1)
Using Your Sources
83(1)
How to Write Syntheses
84(1)
Types of Syntheses: Explanatory and Argument
85(4)
The Explanatory Synthesis
89(1)
Demonstration: Explanatory Synthesis The Car of the Future?
90(36)
The Fuel Subsidy We Need
91(1)
Ricardo Bayon
Putting the Hindenburg to Rest
92(2)
Jim Motavalli
Using Fossil Fuels in Energy Process Gets Us Nowhere
94(2)
Jeremy Rifkin
Lots of Hot Air about Hydrogen
96(9)
Joseph J. Romm
Consider Your Purpose
98(1)
Formulate a Thesis
99(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
100(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
100(1)
Summary Statements
101(1)
Write the Topic Sentences
102(1)
Write Your Synthesis
104(1)
Discussion and Suggestions for Revision
105(1)
Model Paper: The Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Car
105(12)
Janice Hunte
Revise Your Synthesis: Global, Local, and Surface Revisions
115(1)
Revising the Example First Draft: Highlights
116(1)
Revised Model Paper: The Car of the Future?óJanice Hunte
117(9)
Writing Assignment: The "Legacy" Question in College Admissions
126(2)
Chapter 4 Argument Synthesis
128(55)
What Is an Argument Synthesis?
128(7)
The Elements of Argument: Claim, Support, and Assumption
128(2)
The Three Appeals of Argument: Logos, Ethos, Pathos
130(5)
Logos
130(2)
Ethos
132(2)
Pathos
134(1)
Demonstration: Developing an Argument Synthesis Volunteering in America
135(33)
A New Start for National Service
136(1)
John McCain and Evan Bayh
A Time to Heed the Call
137(2)
David Gergen
Volunteering in the United States, 2003
139(7)
Bureau of Labor Statistics
National Service, Political Socialization, and Citizenship
146(2)
Eric B. Gorham
146(2)
Calls for National Service
148(1)
Roger Landrum, Donald J. Eberly, and Michael W. Sherraden
Rumsfeld: No Need for Draft; 'Disadvantages Notable'
149(1)
Kathleen T. Rehm
Politics and National Service: A Virus Attacks the Volunteer Sector
150(6)
Bruce Chapman
150(1)
Consider Your Purpose
152(1)
Making a Claim: Formulate a Thesis
153(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
154(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
154(1)
Argument Strategy
155(1)
Draft and Revise Your Synthesis
156(1)
Model Synthesis: Keeping Volunteerism Voluntary
156(12)
Michael Kikuchi
Discussion
165(3)
Developing and Organizing the Support for Your Arguments
168(5)
Summarize, Paraphrase, and Quote Supporting Evidence
169(1)
Provide Various Types of Evidence and Motivational Appeals
170(1)
Use Climactic Order
170(1)
Use Logical or Conventional Order
171(1)
Present and Respond to Counterarguments
171(1)
Use Concession
171(1)
Avoid Common Fallacies in Developing and Using Support
172(1)
The Comparison-and-Contrast Synthesis
173(8)
Organizing Comparison-and-Contrast Syntheses
173(2)
Organizing by Source or Subject
173(1)
Organizing by Criteria
174(1)
A Case for Comparison-Contrast: World War I and World War II
175(1)
Comparison-Contrast (Organized by Criteria)
175(1)
Model Exam Response: Key Similarities and Differences between World Wars I and II
176(9)
Discussion
179(2)
Summary of Synthesis Chapters
181(1)
Writing Assignment: The "Legacy" Question in College
182(1)
Chapter 5 Analysis
183(36)
What Is an Analysis?
183(2)
Demonstration: Analysis
185(7)
The Plug-In Drug
185(2)
Marie Winn
Model Paper: The Coming Apart of a Dorm Society
187(5)
Edward Peselman
How to Write Analyses
192(9)
Consider Your Purpose
192(1)
Locate an Analytical Principle
193(1)
Sociological InsightsóRandall Collins
194(7)
Formulate a Thesis
196(1)
Part One of the Argument
196(1)
Part Two of the Argument
197(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
197(1)
Turning Key Elements of a Principle or Definition into Questions
197(1)
Developing the Paragraph-by-Paragraph Logic of Your Paper
197(2)
Draft and Revise Your Analysis
199(1)
Write an Analysis, Not a Summary
199(1)
Make Your Analysis Systematic
199(1)
Answer the "So What" Question
200(1)
Attribute Sources Appropriately
200(1)
Writing Assignment: Analysis
201(5)
A Theory of Human Motivation
201(5)
Abraham H. Maslow
Analyzing Visual Media
206(1)
Writing Assignment: Analyzing Visual Media
206(9)
Advertisement: Fancy Feast Cat Food
207(1)
Advertisement: IKEA
208(1)
Advertisement: GE Monogram Appliances
209(2)
The Appeal of the Democracy of Goods
211(1)
Roland Marchand
Elements of an Effective LayoutóDorothy Cohen
212(3)
Analysis: A Tool for Understanding
215(4)
PART TWO: STRATEGIES
Chapter 6 Writing as a Process
219(39)
Writing as Thinking
219(1)
Stages of the Writing Process
220(1)
Stage 1: Understanding the Task
221(4)
Papers in the Academic Disciplines
221(4)
Stage 2: Gathering Data
225(1)
Types of Data
225(1)
Primary and Secondary Sources
226(1)
Stage 3: Invention
226(6)
Choosing and Narrowing Your Subject
227(3)
Invention Strategies
230(2)
Directed Freewriting
230(1)
Listing
230(1)
Outlining
231(1)
Clustering and Branching
231(1)
Drafting
232(1)
Stage 4: Drafting
232(20)
Strategies for Writing the Paper
232(1)
Writing a Thesis
233(6)
The Components of a Thesis
234(1)
Making an Assertion
234(1)
Starting with a Working Thesis
235(1)
Using the Thesis to Plan a Structure
236(3)
Writing Introductions and Conclusions
239(13)
Introductions
239(6)
Conclusions
245(7)
Stage 5: Revision
252(2)
Characteristics of Good Papers
252(2)
Unity
253(1)
Coherence
253(1)
Development
253(1)
The Reverse Outline
254(1)
Stage 6: Editing
254(3)
Editing for Style
254(2)
Editing for Correctness
256(1)
The Final Draft
256(1)
Writing Assignment: Process
257(1)
Chapter 7 Locating, Mining, and Citing Sources
258(51)
Source-Based Papers
258(2)
The Research Question
260(2)
LOCATING SOURCES
262(1)
Preliminary Research
262(4)
Consulting Knowledgeable People
262(1)
Encyclopedias
263(2)
Overviews and Bibliographies in Recent Books
265(1)
Bibliographic Index
266(1)
Subject-Heading Guides
266(1)
Focused Research
266(16)
Electronic Databases
266(4)
The Benefits and Pitfalls of the World Wide Web
270(1)
Evaluating Web Sources
270(1)
Periodicals: General
270(5)
Magazines
274(1)
Newspapers
274(1)
Periodicals: Specialized
275(2)
Books
277(1)
Book Review Digest
278(1)
Biographical Indexes
278(1)
Dictionaries
279(1)
Other Sources/Government Publications
280(1)
Interviews and Surveys
280(2)
MINING SOURCES
282(1)
The Working Bibliography
282(4)
Note-Taking
284(1)
Evaluating Sources
284(2)
Arranging Your Notes: The Outline
286(2)
CITING SOURCES
288(1)
In-Text Citation
288(1)
Content Notes
289(1)
Full Citations
289(1)
MLA Style
290(9)
In-Text Citation
290(2)
In-Text Citation of Electronic Sources (MLA)
292(1)
Examples of MLA Citations in Works Cited List
292(7)
Electronic Sources (MLA)
292(4)
Periodicals (MLA)
296(1)
Books (MLA)
296(2)
Other Sources (MLA)
298(1)
APA Style
299(7)
In-Text Citation
299(2)
In-Text Citation of Electronic Sources (APA)
300(1)
Examples of APA Citations in References List
301(10)
Electronic Sources (APA)
301(2)
Periodicals (APA)
303(1)
Books (APA)
303(2)
Other Sources (APA)
305(1)
Writing Assignment: Source-Based Paper
306(3)
PART THREE: APPLICATIONS
Chapter 8 A Case Study in Academic Writing
309(20)
The Assignment: A Comparative Analysis
309(2)
The Sources
311(5)
From All Quiet on the Western Front
311(2)
Erich Maria Remarque
Death and Victory
313(1)
John Singer Sargent
John Singer Sargent's Murals
314(1)
Mary Crawford Volk
Cemetery Symbolism
314(2)
Pam Reid
Cemetery Symbols: The Palm
316(1)
Richard O. Reisem
The Outline
316(1)
The Paper
317(12)
An Example of Revision
318(2)
The Final Paper: "Death in War: A Comparative Analysis of John Singer Sargent's Death and Victory and Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front"
320(10)
Ryan Cheever
Discussion
326(3)
Chapter 9 Practicing Academic Writing
329(28)
Merit vs. Privilege in College Admissions
329(1)
The Assignments
330(6)
Summary
330(1)
Summary Assignment #1: Summarizing Text
330(1)
Summary Assignment #2: Summarizing Tables
330(1)
Paraphrase
330(1)
Critique
331(1)
Explanatory Synthesis
331(1)
Argument Synthesis
332(1)
Analysis
333(3)
Analysis Assignment #1
333(1)
Analysis Assignment #2
334(2)
The Readings
336(21)
The Curse of Nepotism
336(1)
The Economist
May the Best Man or Woman Win
337(2)
Miriam Schulman
Legacy Admissions Are Defensible Because the Process Can't Be Fair
339(3)
Debra Thomas and Terry Shepard
Time to Bury the Legacy
342(2)
Robert DeKoven
The History of Legacy Admissions
344(2)
Cameron Howell and Sarah E. Turner
Getting In: The Social Logic of Ivy League Admissions
346(1)
Malcolm Gladwell
So Your Dad Went to Harvard
347(3)
Mark Megalli
Preserve Universities' Right to Shape Student Community
350(1)
USA Today
Admissions Confidential: An Insider's Account of the Elite College Selection Process
351(2)
Rachel Toor
Making Ethical Decisions
353(4)
Gerald F. Cavanagh
Credits 357(6)
Index 363


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