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Sequence for Academic Writing, A

by ; ;
ISBN13:

9780321081339

ISBN10:
0321081331
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Longman

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Summary

Based on the best-selling text, Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum, this brief rhetoric focuses on the key academic writing strategiessummary, critique, synthesis, and analysis. Responding to the growing interest in academic writing in first-year composition, this rhetoric focuses on several broad strategies that help students interpret and write about the various kinds of academic texts they'll encounter in college, no matter what discipline they study in.

Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors xvii
Introduction xix
Summary, Paraphrase, and Quotation
1(52)
What Is a Summary?
1(1)
Can a Summary Be Objective?
1(1)
Using the Summary
2(1)
The Reading Process
3(2)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Summaries?
3(2)
How to Write Summaries
5(2)
Box: Critical Reading for Summary
6(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Summaries
7(1)
Demonstration: Summary
7(15)
The Future of Love: Kiss Romance Goodbye, It's Time for the Real Thing
8(3)
Barbara Graham
Read, Reread, Underline
11(1)
Divide into Stages of Thought
12(1)
Write a One- or Two-Sentence Summary of Each Stage of Thought
13(2)
Write a Thesis: A One- or Two-Sentence Summary of the Entire Passage
15(2)
Write the First Draft of the Summary
17(1)
Summary 1: Combine Thesis Sentence with One-Sentence Section Summaries
17(1)
Discussion
18(1)
Summary 2: Combine Thesis Sentence, Section Summaries, and Carefully Chosen Details
18(2)
Discussion
20(1)
Exercise 1.1: Individual and Collaborative Summary Practice
21(1)
Summarizing a Narrative or Personal Essay
22(6)
Why I Will Never Have a Girlfriend
23(4)
Tristan Miller
Box: How to Summarize Personal Essays and Narratives
27(1)
Summarizing Figures and Tables
28(5)
Exercise 1.2: Summarizing Charts
30(3)
Paraphrase
33(5)
Box: How to Write Paraphrases
34(4)
Exercise 1.3: Summarizing and Paraphrasing
38(1)
Quotations
38(10)
Choosing Quotations
39(1)
Box: When to Quote
39(1)
Quoting Memorable Language
39(1)
Quoting Clear and Concise Language
40(1)
Quoting Authoritative Language
41(2)
Incorporating Quotations Into Your Sentences
43(1)
Quoting Only the Part of a Sentence or Paragraph that You Need
43(1)
Incorporating the Quotation into the Flow of Your Own Sentence
43(1)
Avoiding Freestanding Quotations
44(1)
Exercise 1.4: Incorporating Quotations
45(1)
Using Ellipsis Marks
45(1)
Using Brackets to Add or Substitute Words
46(2)
Exercise 1.5: Using Brackets
48(1)
Writing Assignment: Summary
48(5)
Box: When to Summarize, Paraphrase, and Quote
49(1)
Body Body Double: Cloning Infants a Distant Fantasy
49(4)
Alexander M. Capron
Critical Reading and Critique
53(38)
Critical Reading
53(15)
Question Category 1: What Is the Author's Purpose in Writing? Does He or She Succeed in This Purpose?
53(1)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Critiques?
54(1)
Writing to Inform
54(1)
Evaluating Informative Writing
55(1)
Writing to Persuade
56(1)
Exercise 2.1: Informative and Persuasive Thesis Statements
56(1)
Evaluating Persuasive Writing
57(1)
A Simple One-Step Plan to Solve the Education Crisis
57(2)
J. Morton Davis
Exercise 2.2: Critical Reading Practice
59(1)
Persuasive Strategies
59(1)
Logical Argumentation: Avoiding Logical Fallacies
60(1)
Box: Tone
61(4)
Exercise 2.3: Understanding Logical Fallacies
65(1)
Writing To Entertain
65(1)
Question Category 2: To What Extent Do You Agree or Disagree With the Author?
65(1)
Identify Points of Agreement and Disagreement
66(1)
Exercise 2.4: Exploring Your Viewpoints
66(1)
Explore the Reasons for Agreement and Disagreement: Evaluate Assumptions
66(2)
Critique
68(1)
How to Write Critiques
69(1)
Demonstration: Critique
69(6)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Critiques
70(1)
Model Essay: A Critique of J. Morton Davis's Open Letter to the President and Congress
71(3)
Exercise 2.5: Informal Critique of Model Essay
74(1)
Discussion
75(1)
Writing Assignment: Critique
75(16)
Box: Critical Reading for Critique
76(1)
An Avenue to High Academic Standards
77(3)
Lynn Olson
Related Links--an online discussion of issues raised in Olson's essay
80(3)
School-to-Work Will Train, Not Educate
83(2)
Phyllis Schlafly
Related Links--an online discussion of issues raised in Schlafly's essay
85(6)
Writing as a Process: Steps to Writing Theses, Introductions, and Conclusions
91(44)
Writing as a Thinking Process
91(1)
Stages of the Writing Process
92(1)
Getting Started
92(9)
Stage 1: Data Gathering
92(1)
Understanding the Assignment
92(1)
Exercise 3.1: Assignment Analysis
93(1)
Types of Data
93(1)
Primary and Secondary Sources
94(1)
Stage 2: Invention
94(1)
Choosing and Narrowing Your Subjects
94(2)
Exercise 3.2: Practice Narrowing Subjects
96(1)
Common Misconceptions About Writing
96(1)
Writing and Thinking
97(1)
Box: Invention Strategies
98(2)
Time Management
100(1)
Exercise 3.3: Practicing Invention Strategies
101(1)
Writing the Essay
101(19)
Stage 3: Drafting
101(1)
Writing a Thesis
102(1)
The Components of a Thesis
102(1)
Limiting the Scope of the Thesis
103(1)
Start With a Working Thesis
103(1)
Make an Assertion
104(1)
Using the Thesis to Plan Your Essay Structure
105(1)
Using the Thesis
106(1)
Exercise 3.4: Drafting Thesis Statements
107(1)
Writing Introductions
107(1)
Quotation
108(1)
Historical Review
108(1)
Review of a Controversy
109(1)
From the General to the Specific
110(1)
From the Specific to the General: Anecdote, Illustration
110(1)
Question
111(1)
Statement of Thesis
112(1)
Exercise 3.5: Drafting Introductions
113(1)
Writing Conclusions
113(1)
Statement of the Subject's Significance
114(1)
Call for Further Research
114(1)
Solution/Recommendation
115(1)
Anecdote
116(1)
Quotation
117(1)
Question
118(1)
Speculation
119(1)
Exercise 3.6: Drafting Conclusions
120(1)
Revising the Essay
120(8)
Stage 4: Revision
120(1)
The Reverse Outline
121(1)
Box: Characteristics of Good Papers
122(1)
Stage 5: Editing
123(1)
Editing for Style
124(1)
Editing for Correctness
125(1)
Box: Common Sentence-Level Errors
126(1)
Spell-Check and Grammar-Check
126(1)
Stage 6: Publication
127(1)
Demonstration: The Process of Writing a Critique
128(7)
Explanatory Synthesis
135(42)
What is a Synthesis?
135(1)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Syntheses?
136(1)
Purpose
136(1)
Using Your Sources
137(1)
Types of Syntheses: Explanatory and Argument
138(2)
How to Write Syntheses
140(1)
The Explanatory Synthesis
140(1)
Demonstration: Explanatory Synthesis--Computers, Communication, and Relationships
141(23)
Exercise 4.1: Exploring the Topic
141(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Syntheses?
142(1)
Cyberspace: A New Frontier for Fighting Words
143(1)
Sanjiv N. Singh
Social Relationships in Electronic Forums: Hangouts, Salons, Workplaces and Communities
144(1)
Rob Kling
from Signs of Life in the USA
145(1)
Sonia Maasik
Jack Solomon
Life At High-Tech U
145(1)
Deborah Branscum
Developing Personal and Emotional Relationships Via Computer-Mediated Communication
146(1)
Brittney G. Chenault
Cyberspace Romances: Interview with Jean-Francois Perreault of Branchez-vous
146(1)
John Suler
Click Here for Romance
147(1)
Jennifer Wolcott
You've Got Romance! Seeking Love Online: Net-Based Services Change the Landscape, If Not the Odds, of Finding the Perfect Mate
148(1)
Bonnie Rothman Morris
Consider Your Purpose
149(1)
Exercise 4.2: Critical Reading for Synthesis
149(1)
Formulate a Thesis
150(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
151(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
151(3)
Write the Topic Sentences
154(1)
Write Your Synthesis
155(1)
Model Essay: Advantages and Disadvantages of Computer Mediated Communication
155(1)
Alyssa Mellott
Discussion and Suggestions for Revision
155(5)
Exercise 4.3: Revising the Synthesis
160(1)
Revised Model Essay: Computer Mediated Communication: New and Improved Human Relations or the End of Real Interaction?
160(4)
Alyssa Mellott
Writing Assignment: An Expanded Explanatory Synthesis Drawing Upon More Sources
164(13)
Exercise 4.4: Exploring Internet Sources
164(1)
Will We Ever Log Off?
164(1)
Robert Wright
Box: Critical Reading for Synthesis
165(1)
Lonesome Internet Blues, Take 2
166(2)
Scott Rosenberg
Making Clones Among Us
168(1)
Bob Gunn
The Net: It's the Unreal Thing
169(1)
Gil Schwartz
Cyber Time: Living by the Credo `Boot up, Log on and Connect,' University Students are Mounting a Techno-Revolution
170(1)
Joe Chidley
10% of Students May Spend Too Much Time Online, Study Suggests
171(2)
Leo Reisberg
Romance on the Net
173(2)
Ruth C. Eggett
Exercise 4.5: Exploring Primary Sources on the Internet
175(1)
Dear Ann Landers
175(1)
Ann Landers
Exercise 4.6: Summary Statements
176(1)
Argument Synthesis
177(50)
The Argument Synthesis
177(7)
The Elements of Argument: Claim, Support, and Assumption
178(1)
Exercise 5.1: Practicing Claim, Support, and Assumption
179(1)
The Three Appeals of Argument: Logos, Ethos, Pathos
179(1)
Logos
180(2)
Exercise 5.2: Using Deductive and Inductive Logic
182(1)
Ethos
182(1)
Exercise 5.3: Using Ethos
183(1)
Pathos
183(1)
Exercise 5.4: Using Pathos
184(1)
Demonstration: Developing an Argument Synthesis--The Wal-Mart Controversy
184(25)
Ban the Bargains
185(1)
Bob Ortega
Eight Ways to Stop the Store
186(2)
Albert Norman
Wal-Mart's War on Main Street
188(2)
Sarah Anderson
Who's Really the Villain?
190(3)
Jo-Ann Johnston
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Hoover's Handbook of American Business
193(4)
Victorious Secret
197(1)
Albert Norman
Shopping with the Enemy The Economist
198(1)
Exercise 5.5: Critical Reading for Synthesis
199(1)
Consider Your Purpose
200(1)
Making a Claim: Formulate a Thesis
200(1)
Decide How You Will Use Your Source Material
201(1)
Develop an Organizational Plan
201(1)
Argument Strategy
202(1)
Draft and Revise Your Synthesis
203(1)
Model Essay: A Vote for Wal-Mart
203(3)
Discussion
206(3)
Developing and Organizing the Support for Your Arguments
209(3)
Summarize, Paraphrase, and Quote Supporting Evidence
209(1)
Provide Various Types of Evidence and Motivational Appeals
210(1)
Use Climactic Order
210(1)
Use Logical or Conventional Order
210(1)
Present and Respond to Counterarguments
211(1)
Use Concession
211(1)
Avoid Common Fallacies in Developing and Using Support
212(1)
Exercise 5.6: Practicing Arguments
212(1)
The Comparison-and-Contrast Synthesis
212(13)
Organizing Comparison-and-Contrast Syntheses
213(1)
Exercise 5.7: Comparing and Contrasting
214(1)
A Case for Comparison-Contrast: Murder or Manslaughter?
214(1)
Rowland v. State
215(1)
People v. Ashland
215(3)
Instructions to the Jury
218(3)
Comparison-Contrast (Organized by Criteria)
221(1)
Model Essay: Murder or Manslaugher?
221(3)
Discussion
224(1)
Summary
225(2)
Analysis
227(38)
What is Analysis?
227(2)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Analyses?
228(1)
Analytical Thinking
229(1)
Analysis of a Text
229(1)
Box: Guidelines for Writing Analyses
230(1)
Demonstration 1: Analyzing a Short Poem
230(7)
Read the Object under Analysis
230(1)
Wild Nights! Wild Nights!
231(1)
Emily Dickinson
Reread, Make Notes, Look Up Words
232(1)
Take the Work Apart
232(2)
Put the Work Back Together
234(1)
Draft a Preliminary Thesis
234(1)
What, How, and Why
234(1)
Exercise 6.1: Planning a Textual Analysis
235(1)
Multiple Interpretations
236(1)
Exercise 6.2: Practicing Poetry Analysis
236(1)
Kitchenette Building
237(1)
Gwendolyn Brooks
Analyzing Visual Media
237(3)
Parody Ad: A Spoof on Mood-Enhancing Drugs
238(1)
Exercise 6.3: Analyzing an Advertisement
239(1)
Theory as a Tool for Analysis
240(1)
What Is Theory?
241(3)
Theory in the Sciences: The Scientific Method
241(1)
Exercise 6.4: Exploring Theories
242(1)
Theory in the Social Sciences and Humanities
242(2)
How to Apply Theory in Analysis Papers
244(1)
Box: Critical Reading for Analysis
245(1)
Demonstration 2: Applying a Theory to a Particular Phenomenon
245(14)
from Democracy in America
246(3)
Alexis De Tocqueville
Exercise 6.5: Critical Reading of de Tocqueville
249(1)
Applying de Tocqueville's Perspective
249(1)
Exercise 6.6: Practice Applying de Tocqueville's Perspective
250(1)
Choose a Topic
250(1)
Brainstorm
250(1)
Critical Reading and Summary
251(1)
Freewrite
251(2)
Draft a Thesis
253(1)
Write an Outline
254(1)
Write the Analysis
255(1)
Model Essay: Youth and Polorics: The Generation that Doesn't Care
255(4)
Lauren Stocks
Discussion
259(1)
Writing Assignment: Analysis Paper
259(6)
from Identity: Youth and Crisis
260(1)
Erik H. Erikson
The Dissolution of the Self
261(4)
Kenneth J. Gergen
Research
265(62)
Going Beyond this Text
265(1)
Research Papers in the Academic Disciplines
265(4)
Box: Where Do We Find Written Research?
266(2)
Box: Writing the Research Paper
268(1)
Finding a Subject
269(1)
The Research Question
270(1)
Exercise 7.1: Constructing Research Questions
270(1)
Preliminary Research
270(5)
Box: How to Find Preliminary Sources and Narrow the Subject
271(1)
Consulting Knowledgeable People
271(1)
Encyclopedias
272(1)
Exercise 7.2: Exploring Specialized Encyclopedias
273(1)
Overviews and Bibliographies in Recent Books
273(1)
Bibliographic Index
274(1)
Subject-Heading Guides
274(1)
Focused Research
275(15)
Books
275(1)
Book Review Digest
275(1)
Electronic Databases
275(2)
Exercise 7.3: Exploring Electronic Sources
277(1)
The Benefits and Pitfalls of the World Wide Web
277(1)
Box: Using Keywords and Boolean Logic to Refine Online Searches
278(3)
Evaluating Web Sources
281(1)
Exercise 7.4: Practice Evaluating Web Sources
282(1)
Periodicals: General
283(1)
Magazines
283(1)
Newspapers
283(1)
Periodicals: Specialized
284(1)
Journal Articles
284(2)
Exercise 7.5: Exploring Specialized Periodicals
286(1)
Biographical Indexes
286(1)
Dictionaries
287(1)
Other Sources/Government Publications
288(1)
Box: Critical Reading for Research
289(1)
Interviews and Surveys
289(1)
From Research to Working Thesis
290(2)
The Working Bibliography
292(1)
Evaluating Sources
293(1)
Box: Guidelines for Evaluating Sources
293(1)
Note-Taking
294(1)
Invention Strategies
295(1)
Brainstorming without Your Notes
295(1)
Brainstorming with Your Notes
296(1)
Arranging Your Notes: The Outline
296(3)
Writing the Draft
299(2)
Avoiding Plagiarism
301(1)
Box: Rules for Avoiding Plagiarism
301(1)
Citing Sources
302(3)
In-Text Citation
303(1)
Box: Types of Citations
303(1)
Content Notes
303(1)
Full Citations
304(1)
MLA Style
305(10)
In-Text Citation
305(2)
In-Text Citation of Electronic Sources (MLA)
307(1)
Examples of MLA Citations in Works Cited List
307(1)
Books (MLA)
307(3)
Periodicals (MLA)
310(1)
Other Sources (MLA)
311(1)
Electronic Sources (MLA)
312(3)
APA Style
315(10)
In-Text Citation
315(2)
In-Text Citation of Electronic Sources (APA)
317(1)
Examples of APA Citations in References List
318(1)
Books (APA)
318(2)
Periodicals (APA)
320(1)
Other Sources (APA)
321(1)
Electronic Sources (APA)
322(3)
Writing Assignment: Short Research Paper
325(2)
Credits 327(4)
Index 331


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