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Shaping Space : The Dynamics of Three-Dimensional Design,9780534613938
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Shaping Space : The Dynamics of Three-Dimensional Design

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780534613938

ISBN10:
0534613934
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/15/2006
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning

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This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 2/15/2006.
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Summary

As an introductory guide to three-dimensional design and sculpture, SHAPING SPACE offers an engaging, in-depth exploration of aesthetic and practical considerations of working three-dimensionally. By presenting both conventional artistic wisdom and new approaches that stretch and transcend the old definitions of what can and should happen in a work of art, SHAPING SPACE challenges students to encounter ideas that have never occurred to them and to become more aware of the limitless potential of shaping space. Now in full-color throughout, the text explores the latest changes and applications in the field including computer-aided and computer-made sculpture, craft techniques, multicultural art, art as social and political commentary, architecture and industrial design conceived sculpturally, public sculpture, sculpture parks, and performance art. To help introduce and broaden three-dimensional awareness and technical skill, suggested studio projects provide structured assignments that relate directly to textual materials.

Table of Contents

PART ONE: FUNDAMENTALS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
1(78)
Experiencing Three-Dimensionality
2(32)
Photographs of Three-Dimensional Work
3(8)
Set Point of View
4(1)
Flattening Out
5(2)
Scale
7(1)
The Photographer's Interpretation
8(1)
The Photograph as the Work of Art
9(2)
Degrees of Three-Dimensionality
11(6)
Frontal Works
13(2)
The Full Round
15(1)
Walk-Through Works
16(1)
Involving the Viewer
17(17)
Tactile / Visual Appeal
18(1)
Engaging Curiosity
19(1)
Representation
20(1)
Abstraction and Stylization
21(1)
Scale
22(3)
Content
25(3)
Personal Interaction
28(4)
The Unexpected
32(1)
Verbal Statements and Titles
32(2)
Working in-the-Round
34(28)
Gravity
34(4)
The Setting
38(5)
Size
43(1)
Materials
44(4)
Planning Three-Dimensional Work
48(4)
Form Versus Function
52(5)
Cost and Audience
57(5)
Organizing Principles of Design
62(17)
Repetition
64(2)
Variety
66(3)
Rhythm
69(2)
Balance
71(3)
Emphasis and Economy
74(2)
Proportion
76(3)
PART TWO: ELEMENTS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
79(114)
Form
80(14)
Exterior Versus Interior Forms
82(2)
Primary and Secondary Contours
84(2)
Positive and Negative Forms
86(3)
Static and Dynamic Forms
89(2)
Representational, Abstract, and Nonobjective Forms
91(3)
Space
94(18)
Delineated Forms in Space
94(2)
Activated Surrounding Space
96(4)
Confined Space
100(3)
Spatial Relationships
103(5)
Scale
108(1)
Spatial Illusions
109(3)
Line
112(14)
Linear Works
112(5)
Lines Within Forms
117(1)
Implied and Directional Lines
118(3)
Qualities of Lines
121(5)
Texture
126(11)
Natural Texture
127(2)
Worked Texture
129(5)
Visual Texture
134(3)
Light
137(16)
Value
137(5)
Natural Lighting
142(1)
Artificial Lighting
143(3)
Reflected Light
146(3)
Light as a Medium
149(4)
Color
153(22)
Color Vocabulary
154(3)
Natural Color
157(3)
Applied Color
160(5)
Effects of Color: Physiological and Psychological
165(4)
Color Combinations
169(6)
Time and Movement
175(18)
Illusion of Movement
175(2)
Viewing Time
177(3)
Controlled Time
180(5)
Free Time
185(5)
Timelessness
190(3)
PART THREE: CONSTRUCTION METHODS
193(58)
Found Objects
194(11)
Individual Found Objects
194(2)
Assemblages
196(1)
Junk Sculpture
197(4)
Installations
201(4)
Addition and Manipulation
205(23)
Manipulating Malleable Materials
205(10)
Clay
206(5)
Wax
211(1)
Plaster and Cement
212(1)
Malleable Metals
213(2)
Fiber Arts
215(3)
Glass
218(1)
Fabrication With Rigid Materials
219(5)
Wood Fabrication
219(2)
Metal Fabrication
221(2)
Plastic Fabrication
223(1)
Stonemasonry
224(1)
Mixed Media
224(4)
Subtraction
228(9)
Qualities of the Materials
228(3)
Revealing the Form
231(3)
Textures and Values
234(3)
Casting
237(14)
Solid Casts
238(7)
Hollow Casts
245(2)
Foundries and Editions
247(2)
The Outsides and Insides of Casts
249(2)
PART FOUR: STUDIO PROJECT
251(12)
Chapter 1
252(1)
From Three-Dimensionality to Two-Dimensionality
252(1)
From Two-Dimensionality to Three-Dimensionality
252(1)
Modular Low Relief
252(1)
The Wrapped Object
252(1)
Walk-Through Work
253(1)
Chapter 2
253(1)
Good and Bad Design
253(1)
Form and Function
253(1)
Working with the Setting
253(1)
Defying Gravity
253(1)
Working on a Large Scale
254(1)
Chapter 3
254(1)
Repetition
254(1)
Variety
254(1)
Visual Rhythm
254(1)
Visual Balance
255(1)
Emphasis
255(1)
Chapter 4
255(1)
From Flat Material to Volume
255(1)
Curvilinear Form
255(1)
Exterior and Interior Forms
255(1)
Metamorphosis
255(1)
Fill-a-Bag
256(1)
Chapter 5
256(1)
Negative Forms in Space
256(1)
Activated Surrounding Space
256(1)
Confined Space
256(1)
Scale Change
256(1)
Illusionary Space
256(1)
Chapter 6
256(1)
Wire Sculpture
256(1)
Directional Line
257(1)
Line and Form
257(1)
Chapter 7
257(1)
Texture Switch
257(1)
Three Textures Together
257(1)
Visual Textures
257(1)
Soft Sculpture
257(1)
Contradicting a Form
258(1)
Chapter 8
258(1)
Natural versus Artificial Lighting
258(1)
Shadows
258(1)
Light as a Medium
258(1)
Chapter 9
258(1)
Natural Colors
258(1)
Applied Color
258(1)
Psychological Effects of Color
259(1)
Removal of Color
259(1)
Color Combinations
259(1)
Chapter 10
259(1)
Growth or Decay
259(1)
Kinetic Sculpture
259(1)
Controlling the Viewer's Movements
259(1)
Changes by the Viewer
260(1)
Chapter 11
260(1)
Ready-Made
260(1)
Assemblage
260(1)
Chapter 12
260(1)
Clay or Wax Sculpture
260(1)
Addition with Malleable Materials
260(1)
Fabrication with Rigid Materials
260(1)
Skin and Structure
260(1)
Wood, Burlap, and Plaster Construction
261(1)
Joinery
261(1)
Chapter 13
261(1)
Wood Carving
261(1)
Plaster Carving
261(1)
``Stone'' Carving
261(1)
Chapter 14
261(2)
Paper Casting
261(1)
Plaster Casting in Clay
262(1)
Cast Hands
262(1)
Glossary 263(6)
Index 269(8)
Photographic Credits 277


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