9780321187918

A Short Guide to Writing about Music

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780321187918

  • ISBN10:

    0321187911

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 4/20/2006
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

A Short Guide to Writing about Music correlates the skills acquired in music composition, playing, and studying to the skills needed for successful writing-commitment, practice, revision, balance, and control. This writing guide offers clear instruction and a wide range of writing tasks-from reaction papers and concert reviews, to program notes and abstracts, to persuasive essays and research papers. Many student and professional writing samples are included to illustrate these assignments, with accompanying commentary and suggestions for students. Book jacket.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Writing About Music
1(20)
Words About Music: Why?
1(2)
Choosing an Audience
3(1)
Kinds of Writing
4(5)
History and Biography
4(1)
Style Study
5(2)
Analysis
7(1)
Performance Study
8(1)
Organological, Archival, and Source Studies
8(1)
Criticism
9(8)
Marxist Criticism
10(1)
Soviet Pseudo-Marxist Criticism
11(1)
Cultural Criticism
12(1)
Gender Studies in Music
13(2)
Postcolonial Criticism
15(2)
The Author's Opinion: Clarity and Restraint
17(4)
Writing About Music By, and For, Those Who Cannot (Necessarily) Read It
21(19)
What You Can and Cannot Do
24(1)
The Concert Review
25(4)
Reporting on a News Event
25(1)
Artistic Evaluation
26(3)
Promoting Community Interest in Music
29(1)
Popular and World Musics
29(11)
Crossing the Cultural Divide
35(5)
Writing Music Analysis
40(16)
Analysis and Its Uses
40(3)
Analytical Content vs. Play-by-Play
43(3)
Analysis Without Musical Examples
45(1)
Technical Terminology
46(1)
Two Analytical Excerpts with Commentary
47(4)
Organizing Analytical Writing
51(5)
Three Kinds of Practical Writing
56(16)
Program and Liner Notes
57(8)
Biographical Background
59(1)
Cultural Context
59(1)
Style and Affect
59(6)
Summaries and Abstracts
65(3)
The Summary
65(1)
The Abstract
66(2)
The Press Release
68(4)
Belief into Words: Opinion and the Writing of an Effective Essay
72(20)
Presentation and Tone
73(4)
Organization
73(1)
Confrontational Writing
73(3)
Stylistic Excess
76(1)
The Writing Process: From Outline to Final Draft
77(13)
``Benefits of the Suzuki Method,'' by Jessica Mosier
77(6)
``Skryabin's Mystical Beliefs and the Holographic Model,'' by Jeff Simpson
83(7)
Hints on Beginning
90(2)
Research in Music
92(24)
The Purposes of Research
92(1)
Choice of Topic
93(1)
Locating Sources
94(1)
Kinds of Written Sources
95(7)
Non-English Sources
95(1)
Reference Sources
96(1)
Books
97(1)
Journal and Magazine Articles
98(1)
Other Web-Based Sources
99(1)
Recording Liner Notes
100(1)
Musical Scores
101(1)
Use of Sources
102(7)
Optimizing Research Time
102(1)
Don't Believe Everything You Read!
103(1)
Scholarly vs. Textbook Sources
103(1)
Relative Age of Sources
104(1)
Authorial Perspective
105(1)
Dependability of the Source Itself
106(1)
Special Difficulties in Using Musical Sources
106(3)
Citing Your Sources
109(1)
To Quote or to Paraphrase?
110(1)
Turning Research Into Writing
110(2)
The Foundations of Your Research
110(1)
On Being Derivative
111(1)
Whose Ideas?
112(4)
Choice of Sources
112(1)
The Opening Paragraph
112(1)
Conclusions
113(3)
A Sample Research Paper in Music
116(19)
``Gerswin's French Connection,'' by Amie Margoles
116(17)
Commentary on the Margoles Paper
133(2)
Style in Writing
135(26)
The Meaning of ``Style''
135(4)
Academic Style Traits
139(6)
Complex Sentence Structure
139(1)
Obscure Words
139(1)
First Person Plural
140(1)
Passive Voice
141(2)
Traditional Academic Organization
143(2)
Fashioning Clear Sentences
145(7)
Taste
147(1)
Gender-Neutral Wording and the Pronoun Problem
148(1)
Transitions
149(2)
Variety
151(1)
Punctuation
152(3)
Colon, Semicolon, and Comma
153(1)
A Note on Hyphens and Centuries
154(1)
Specifically Musical Uses of Punctuation
155(1)
Accuracy in Wording
155(4)
Ill-Advised Upgrades
156(1)
Beat, Meter, Rhythm
157(1)
That and Which
158(1)
Accuracy in Spelling and Punctuation
158(1)
Aggregate Titles
158(1)
Awkward Wording
159(1)
Toward a Personal Style
159(2)
The Final Manuscript
161(28)
General Format
161(3)
Binding, Paper, Duplication
161(1)
Word Processing
161(1)
Copies
162(1)
Title Page
163(1)
Spacing and Margins
163(1)
Block Quotations
163(1)
Bibliography
164(1)
Abbreviations
164(1)
Latin Abbreviations and Terminology
164(1)
Musical Abbreviations
165(1)
Titles of Musical Works
165(1)
Musical Examples and Captions
166(3)
Production of Examples
167(1)
Captions
168(1)
The Citation Process
169(4)
Footnotes or Endnotes?
170(1)
Parenthetical Citation Format
171(1)
Incomplete Citations
172(1)
Abbreviated Citation Form
173(1)
Sample Citations
173(14)
Explanatory Footnotes
186(1)
Musical Scores
186(1)
Last-Minute Corrections
187(2)
Index 189

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