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The Skills Of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, And Communities With Infotrac,9780534514136
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The Skills Of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, And Communities With Infotrac

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780534514136

ISBN10:
0534514138
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/5/2005
Publisher(s):
Brooks Cole
List Price: $132.33
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Summary

Shulman's text introduces a model for the helping process based on an 'interactional' approach, which uses a number of theories and skills to build on the client-helper relationship. By presenting the core processes and skills in the chapters on work with individuals, Shulman shows how common elements exist across stages of helping and across different populations. These processes and skills reappear in the discussions of group, family, and community work. New copies of this text are accompanied by two CD-ROMs: one that illustrates the core skills covered in the text, and another that features video excerpts of an interactive workshop conducted by Larry Shulman.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
PART I A Model of the Helping Process
1(52)
An Interactional Approach to Helping
2(51)
Social Work Practice Theory
3(1)
The Client-System Interaction
4(5)
Underlying Assumptions in the Interactional Model
9(8)
Assumption of Symbiosis
10(3)
Assumption of Obstacles in the Engagement
13(1)
The Increasing Complexity of Human Social Systems
13(1)
Divergence in Self-Interest and Social Interest
14(1)
Problems of Interpersonal Communication
15(1)
Assumption of Strength for Change
16(1)
The Social Work Profession: A Historical Perspective
17(6)
The Roots of the Profession
18(2)
The Function of the Social Work Profession
20(3)
Social Work Skill and the Working Relationship
23(3)
The Integration of Personal and Professional Selves
26(2)
Oppression Psychology
28(6)
The Master-Slave Paradigm
29(1)
Indicators of Oppression
30(2)
Alienation and Psychopathology
32(1)
Methods of Defense Against Oppression
33(1)
Resilience Theory
34(8)
Developmental Psychology Theory and Research
35(4)
Resilience and Life-Span Theory
39(2)
Implications for Social Work Practice
41(1)
Additional Social Work Perspectives
42(10)
Solution-Focused Practice
42(1)
Major Assumptions on the Nature of the Helping Relationship
43(1)
Defining Techniques
43(2)
Radical Social Work Practice
45(1)
Feminist Practice
45(3)
Social Work as Psychotherapy
48(1)
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
48(4)
Chapter Summary
52(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
52(1)
PART II Social Work With Individuals
53(158)
The Preliminary Phase of Work
54(22)
Communications in Practice
55(2)
Obstacles to Direct Communication
55(1)
Examples of Indirect Communication in Practice
56(1)
The Preliminary Phase: Tuning In to Self and to the Client
57(13)
Tuning In to the Authority Theme
58(3)
The Impact of Diversity
61(1)
Elements of the Working Relationship
62(3)
Affective Versus Intellectual Tuning In
65(2)
Tuning In to One's Own Feelings
67(1)
Different Levels of Tuning In
67(3)
Responding Directly to Indirect Cues
70(5)
Chapter Summary
75(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
75(1)
Beginnings and the Contracting Skills
76(37)
The Dynamics of New Relationships
78(5)
Contracting in First Sessions
83(18)
Contracting Example
84(2)
Some Variant Elements in Contracting
86(1)
Research Findings on Contracting
87(1)
Contracting Over Time
88(2)
Contracting With Resistant Clients
90(11)
Models for Assessment in the Beginning Phase
101(2)
Culturally Diverse Practice
103(8)
Working With Mexican Americans
105(1)
Working With African Americans
105(2)
Working With American Indians
107(2)
Working With Canadian Indians
109(1)
Issues in Cross-Racial Practice
109(2)
Education and Training for Culturally Sensitive Practice
111(1)
Chapter Summary
111(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
112(1)
Skills in the Work Phase
113(65)
A Model of the Work Phase Interview
114(1)
Work Phase Summary
115(2)
Sessional Tuning-In Skills
117(6)
Tuning In to the Client's Sense of Urgency
117(2)
Tuning In to the Worker's Own Feelings
119(1)
Tuning In to the Meaning of the Client's Struggle
120(1)
Tuning In and the Worker's Realities of Time and Stress
121(1)
Tuning In to the Worker's Own Life Experiences
122(1)
Sessional Contracting Skills
123(3)
Elaborating Skills
126(7)
Containment
126(1)
Moving From the General to the Specific
127(1)
Focused Listening
128(1)
Questioning
129(1)
Reaching Inside of Silences
130(3)
Empathic Skills
133(7)
Reaching for Feelings
136(1)
Displaying Understanding of the Client's Feelings
136(2)
Putting the Client's Feelings Into Words
138(1)
Research on Empathy
138(2)
Sharing the Worker's Feelings
140(7)
Issues in Sharing the Worker's Feelings
144(2)
Research on Sharing Feelings
146(1)
Making a Demand for Work
147(7)
Partializing Client Concerns
150(2)
Holding to Focus
152(1)
Checking for Underlying Ambivalence
152(1)
Challenging the Illusion of Work
153(1)
Pointing Out Obstacles
154(6)
Supporting Clients in Taboo Areas
155(3)
Dealing With the Authority Theme
158(2)
Identifying Process and Content Connections
160(4)
Sharing Data
164(6)
Providing Relevant Data
165(2)
Providing Data in a Way That Is Open to Examination
167(2)
Ethical Dilemmas in Withholding Data
169(1)
Helping the Client See Life in New Ways
170(1)
Sessional Ending and Transition Skills
171(5)
Summarizing
172(1)
Generalizing
172(1)
Identifying the Next Steps
173(1)
Rehearsal
174(1)
Identifying ``Doorknob'' Communications
175(1)
Chapter Summary
176(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
177(1)
Endings and Transitions
178(33)
The Dynamics and Skills of Endings
180(9)
Denial
181(2)
Indirect and Direct Expressions of Anger
183(3)
Mourning
186(2)
Trying It On for Size
188(1)
The Farewell-Party Syndrome
189(1)
The Skills of Transitions
189(9)
Identification of Major Learning
190(2)
Identification of Areas for Future Work
192(2)
Synthesizing the Ending Process and Content
194(1)
Transitions to New Experiences and Support Systems
195(3)
Variations on Endings
198(11)
Ending a Relationship That Never Really Began
198(3)
Endings Caused by the Termination of the Worker's Job
201(2)
Endings Caused by the Death of the Client
203(1)
Traumatic Events and Their Impact on a Worker's Practice
203(1)
Suicide on a Caseload
204(3)
Working With a Dying Client
207(2)
Chapter Summary
209(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
209(2)
PART III Social Work With Families
211(54)
Family Practice in the Social Work Context
212(32)
Social Work With Families
213(1)
Selected Concepts From Family Therapy Theory
214(4)
The Two-Client Concept and the Worker's Role
218(2)
The Beginning Phase
220(5)
First Family Session With an Angry Father
221(3)
Discussion of This First Family Session
224(1)
The Middle Phase
225(7)
Two Special Circumstances
232(9)
Working With a Single-Parent Family
233(1)
The Impact of Culture and Community: A White Worker and an American Indian Family
234(7)
The Ending and Transition Phase
241(1)
Chapter Summary
242(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
242(2)
Problem-Centered Family Practice
244(21)
Agency Mandate, Client Problem, and Family Counseling
245(1)
Hiding the Family's Secrets: Dealing With Taboo Areas
246(1)
The Child Welfare Setting
247(11)
Work With Foster Parents
247(6)
Work With Children in Residential Care
253(4)
Work With Teen Parents and Their Families of Origin
257(1)
Family Practice in a School Setting
258(6)
Chapter Summary
264(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
264(1)
PART IV Social Work With Groups
265(230)
The Group as a Mutual-Aid System
266(16)
The Fear-of-Groups Syndrome
268(1)
The Dynamics of Mutual Aid
269(10)
Sharing Data
270(1)
The Dialectical Process
271(1)
Discussing a Taboo Area
271(1)
The ``All-in-the-Same-Boat'' Phenomenon
272(1)
Developing a Universal Perspective
273(1)
Mutual Support
274(1)
Mutual Demand
275(1)
Individual Problem-Solving
275(1)
Rehearsal
276(2)
The ``Strength-in-Numbers'' Phenomenon
278(1)
Obstacles to Mutual Aid
279(1)
The Function of the Group Leader
280(1)
Chapter Summary
281(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
281(1)
Group Formation
282(23)
Preparing for Group Work
283(1)
Work With the Staff System
283(10)
Achieving Consensus on the Service
284(5)
Identifying Group Type and Structure
289(2)
Group Versus Individual Work With Clients
291(1)
Agency Support for Groups
292(1)
Group Composition, Timing, and Structure
293(6)
Group Member Selection
294(2)
Group Timing
296(2)
Group Structure, Setting, and Rules
298(1)
Work With Prospective Members
299(5)
Strategizing for Effective Referrals
300(1)
Worker Skills in the Initial Interviews
301(3)
Chapter Summary
304(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
304(1)
The Beginning Phase in the Group
305(55)
The Dynamics of First Group Sessions
306(2)
The Couples' Group: An Illustration
308(18)
The Initial Work
308(10)
The Work Continues
318(5)
Ending and Transition
323(3)
Variations on First Group Sessions
326(17)
Working With Children and Adolescents
326(1)
Foster Adolescents in a Child Welfare Setting
326(1)
Setting Limits: An Adolescent Acting-Out Boys' Group
327(2)
Impact of Authority: Involuntary Groups
329(1)
Stages of Change Model
330(2)
Male Batterers
332(1)
Driving While Intoxicated (DWI)
332(3)
Working With Specific Client Problems
335(1)
Parents of Children With Cerebral Palsy
335(1)
Women With MS: Crying in the First Session
335(2)
Impact of the Setting
337(1)
Impact of Time
338(5)
Recontracting
343(14)
Recontracting With One's Own Group
344(6)
Joining an Ongoing Group
350(7)
Coleadership in Groups
357(2)
Chapter Summary
359(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
359(1)
The Work Phase in the Group
360(23)
Sessional Contracting in the Group
361(10)
Reaching for Individual Communication in the Group
362(5)
Reaching for the Group Response to the Individual
367(1)
Reaching for the Work When Obstacles Threaten
368(1)
Teenager in a Residential Center, Raising a Difficult Subject
369(1)
Mothers of Children Diagnosed with Hyperactivity
370(1)
Mothers of Sixth-Grade Underachieving Boys
371(1)
The Work Phase in a Group Session
371(9)
Helping the Group Work Over Time
372(5)
Focusing the Group on Problem-Solving Mutual Aid
377(3)
Sessional Endings and Transitions
380(2)
Chapter Summary
382(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
382(1)
Working With the Individual and the Group
383(67)
The Concept of Role in a Dynamic System
384(2)
The Scapegoat
386(8)
A Scapegoating Example
387(6)
Dealing With the Scapegoating Pattern
393(1)
The Deviant Member
394(8)
Extreme Versus Mild Deviance
395(1)
Reaching for the Underlying Message of Deviant Behavior
396(1)
Deviant Behavior as a Functional Role
396(1)
Opening a Discussion of the Group's Functioning
397(1)
Deepening a Discussion
398(1)
The Internal Leader: Ally or Enemy?
399(3)
The Gatekeeper
402(1)
The Defensive Member
403(9)
A Defensive Father in a Parents' Group
404(1)
Denial in a Living-With-Cancer Group
405(7)
The Quiet Member
412(3)
Worker Strategies
412(1)
The Member Who Is Afraid to Speak
413(1)
The Member Who Feels Left Out
414(1)
The Monopolizer
415(1)
The Group as an Organism
416(2)
Developmental Tasks for the Group
418(30)
Dealing With the Relationship to the Worker
419(6)
Dealing With the Relationship Among Members
425(1)
College Student Counseling Group and the Intimacy Theme
426(2)
Intimacy and the Relational Model
428(8)
Developing a Culture for Work
436(1)
Parents of Hyperactive Children: Accepting Difficult Feelings
437(3)
Married Couples: Legitimizing the Expression of Anger
440(1)
Married Couples: Dealing With Sexual Taboos
441(2)
Inner-City Elementary School: The Impact of Violence in the Family
443(1)
Residential Center for Young Men in the Criminal Justice System
444(1)
The Impact of Ethnicity on Group Culture
444(2)
Developing a Structure for Work
446(2)
Chapter Summary
448(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
449(1)
Endings and Transitions With Groups
450(20)
Ending and Transition Phase Summary
451(1)
Group Illustrations
452(12)
Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
452(2)
Children's Group in an Elementary School
454(2)
Male Batterers' Group
456(2)
Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse
458(6)
A Termination Session: The Worker Leaving the Group
464(4)
Chapter Summary
468(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
469(1)
Variations in Group Practice
470(25)
The Open-Ended Group
471(3)
Hospital Group on a Gynecological Ward
471(2)
Bringing a New Member Into an AIDS Group
473(1)
The Single-Session Group
474(3)
Information Group: Foster Parent Recruitment
475(1)
Informal Event Group: Remembering the Holocaust
476(1)
Activity Groups
477(16)
Children Dealing With Their Parents' Separation and Divorce
480(11)
Vietnamese Immigrant Women
491(2)
Chapter Summary
493(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
493(2)
PART V Social Work With the System
495(108)
Professional Impact and Helping Clients Negotiate the System
496(44)
The Individual-System Interaction
498(1)
Mediating the Individual-System Engagement
499(14)
First Reactions to a System
500(2)
Work With the School System
502(6)
Work With a Psychiatrist in a Hospital Setting
508(5)
Confrontation, Social Pressure, and Advocacy
513(6)
Professional Impact on the System
519(2)
From Individual Problems to Social Action
521(7)
Illustrations of Agency Change
522(1)
Hospital Emergency Room Service
522(1)
Rehabilitation Institution for Paraplegics
523(2)
Sexuality in a Home for the Aged
525(1)
Social Action in the Community
525(3)
Professional Impact and Interstaff Relationships
528(10)
The Agency as a Social System
529(2)
Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Work With a Client
531(1)
Interdepartmental Communications in a Large System
532(4)
Impact on Relations With Staff at Other Agencies
536(2)
Chapter Summary
538(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
539(1)
Social Work in the Community
540(37)
Community Practice in the Social Work Context
541(2)
Community Organizing Philosophy and Models
543(4)
Grassroots Community Organizing
543(1)
Community Organizing Around a Specific Issue
544(1)
Rurally Based Community Organization Practice
545(1)
The Use of the Internet in Community Practice
546(1)
The Neighborhood as Community
547(22)
Structure and Maintenance: A Citizen's Antipoverty Action Group
548(3)
Contracting: A Tenants' Group in Public Housing
551(3)
Negotiating the Environment: Welfare Mothers and the Housing Agency
554(9)
The Deviant Member: Community-Based Citizens' Advisory Board
563(1)
Relationship to the Environment: Adolescent Peer Leaders
564(5)
The Milieu as Community
569(6)
Chapter Summary
575(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
576(1)
The Impact of the Agency, Ethics, Legislation, and Evaluation
577(26)
Agency Records, Referral Reports, and the Agency Culture
578(2)
Values and Ethics in Social Work Practice
580(10)
Historical Context
581(1)
Ethical Problems and Dilemmas
582(1)
Factors Affecting Ethical Decision Making
583(2)
Values and Ethics in the Professional Literature
585(1)
Guidelines for Practice in Family and Group Work
586(2)
The Impact of Managed Care on Ethical Practice
588(2)
The Impact of Legislation and the Court
590(6)
Licensing and the Social Work Profession
590(1)
Confidentiality and Privileged Communications
590(3)
Informed Consent
593(1)
The Duty to Warn
594(2)
Evaluation of Practice: Process and Outcomes
596(6)
Process Evaluation: The Record of Service
597(2)
Outcome Evaluation: The Single-System Research Design
599(1)
The Scientist-Practitioner Model
600(2)
Chapter Summary
602(1)
Related Online Content and Activities
602(1)
Glossary 603(8)
References 611(7)
Index of Case Examples 618(5)
Name Index 623(2)
Subject Index 625


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