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Social Fabric Vol. 1 : American Life from 1607 to 1877

by ;
Edition:
10th
ISBN13:

9780321333827

ISBN10:
0321333829
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Longman

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Summary

This anthology of readings portrays the lives of ordinary Americans and examines the diversity of the American people, from the earliest settlement ofAmericato Reconstruction.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
PART I COLONIAL AMERICANS 2(66)
1 New Ways: Indian and European
4(16)
How Indian and European daily lives changed because of their contact.
From Colin Calloway, New Worlds for All.
2 The Creation of a Slave Society in the Chesapeake
20(16)
A description of how the Chesapeake became a slave society of African Americans.
From Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America.
3 Colonial Women
36(18)
The important and largely independent economic role of colonial women and their crucial contribution to colonial America.
From Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, "Martha Ballard and Her Girls," in Stephen Innes, ed, Work and Labor in Early America.
4 The Witchcraft Scare
54(14)
The beliefs and anxieties of ministers and common people about the danger of Satan, and the fate of those accused of practicing witchcraft.
From John C. Miller, This New Man, The American.
PART II REVOLUTIONARY PEOPLES 68(82)
5 Native American Women-From Princesses to Wenches
70(12)
The powerful position of Native American women and the dramatically different views whites held of their gender in the colonial period.
From Eirlys M. Barker, "Princesses, Wives, and Wenches: White Perceptions of Southeastern Indian Women to 1770," in Larry D. Eldridge, ed., Women and Freedom in Early America.
6 German Immigrant Survival Tactics
82(16)
The importance of ethnic identity and communications within the German community of colonial America.
From Aaron S. Fogleman, Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775.
7 Building an Army
98(14)
The appalling conditions of starvation and suffering as well as the courage of the farmers, laborers, servants, and freed slaves who fought in Washington's army.
From John E. Ferling, A Wilderness of Miseries: War and Warriors in Early America.
8 Revolutionary Women
112(18)
How women coped with the revolutionary era as loyalists and revolutionaries.
From Joan R. Gundersen, To Be Useful to the World, Women In Revolutionary America, 1740-1790.
9 Sailors and Slaves in the Revolution
130(20)
How the actions of the "motley crew" influenced beliefs and actions in the Revolutionary era.
From Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker, The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners, and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantio.
PART III THE TRIALS OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC 150(60)
10 Neighborhood and Class in an Industrial Age
152(14)
How the industrial revolution changed the lives of many Americans and created distinctions in American society.
From Walter Licht, Industrializing America: The Nineteenth Century
11 Trail of Tears
166(14)
A tragic chapter in United States-Indian relations-the rounding up of the Cherokee Indians and their forced removal beyond the Mississippi River.
From Dale Van Every, Disinherited: The Lost Birthright of the American Indian.
12 The Affectionate Family
180(14)
Changes in the relations of husband and wife and parents and children, which led to a new, more supportive and individualistic family life.
From Steven Mintz and Susan Kellogg, Domestic Revolutions: A Social History of American Family Life.
13 Getting Rid of Demon Alcohol
194(16)
The popular and successful campaign to reduce or stop drinking in pre-Civil War America.
From Ronald G. Walters, American Reformers, 1815-1860 second edition.
PART IV INDUSTRIAL NORTH AND PLANTER SOUTH 210(58)
14 The Midwestern Farm
212(12)
A description of changes in midwestern farming, as commercialization accelerated, and of the life and labor of men and women.
From John M. Faragher, Women and Men on the Overland Trail.
15 The African-American Family
224(14)
A description of the auction block and the slave trade, and the effects of the selling of loved ones upon the black family.
From Leslie H. Owens, This Species of Property: Slave Life and Culture in the Old South.
16 A Nation of Immigrants
238(14)
Motivations for leaving Ireland, living and working conditions in America, and the stereotypes of Irish men and women in a hostile environment.
From David A. Gerber, The Making of an American Pluralism: Buffalo, New York, 1825-60.
17 Urban Problems
252(16)
The role of the crowd and violence in Protestant-Catholic conflict in nineteenth-century Philadelphia.
From Michael Feldberg, The Turbulent Era: Riot and Disorder in Jacksonian America.
PART V WESTERN EXPANSION AND CIVIL WAR 268
18 The Way West
270(14)
A description of the way in which migrants on the long trail west cooperated with each other, and were assisted by the Indians whose lands they crossed.
From John D. Unruh, Jr., The Plains Across: The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West, 1840-1860.
19 Early Texans-The Common Ground Between Anglos and Tejanos in Republican Texas
284(12)
What easterners and Mexicans shared in antebellum Texas.
From Jesús F. de la Teja, "Discovering the Tejano Community of "Early" Texas," Journal of the Early Republic, 1998, 74-98.
20 Why Soldiers Went to War
296(12)
Soldiers on both sides reveal if slavery was the reason they fought and how their reasons changed during the four-year conflict.
From James M. McPherson, What they Fought For, 1861-1865.
21 When the Yankees Came
308(18)
The realities of living in the South with northern troops present or close at hand.
From Stephen V. Ash. When the Yankees Came: Conflict and Chaos in the Occupied South, 1861-1865.
22 Political Violence During Reconstruction
326
How attempts to transform the social and economic structure of the South in the years after the Civil War fell victim to racism and violence.
From Samuel C. Hyde, Jr., Pistols and Politics.


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