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Social Work: A Profession of Many Faces

by ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780205272242

ISBN10:
020527224X
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/1997
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference

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Summary

Commitment to diversity, through coverage of practice with many different types of populations. Readable and interesting with case examples and vignettes. Latest data on employment and job prospects for social workers, including website addresses. IM/TB, CTB, and Video.

Table of Contents

Preface xvi
Part One SOCIAL WORK IN U.S. SOCIETY 1(69)
Social Welfare: A Response to Human Need
5(22)
Prefatory Comment
5(1)
Some Social Workers in Action
6(1)
Identifying Human Needs
7(1)
Social Welfare Programs
8(1)
The Evolution of Social Programs
9(5)
Colonial Times to the Great Depression
10(2)
The Great Depression to the Present
12(2)
The Need for Social Welfare Programs Today: Children and Youth
14(3)
Expenditures on Social Programs
15(2)
Continuing Issues in Social Welfare
17(5)
Purposes and Goals for Social Programs
17(1)
Responsibility for Meeting Human Needs
18(2)
Human Service as a Right
20(1)
Social Program Conceptions
20(1)
Human Service Program Categories
21(1)
Concluding Comment
22(5)
Social Work: A Comprehensive Helping Profession
27(24)
Prefatory Comment
27(1)
The Central Themes Underpinning Social Work
28(5)
A Commitment to Social Betterment
29(1)
A Goal to Enhance Social Functioning
29(1)
An Action Orientation
29(1)
An Appreciation for Human Diversity
30(1)
A Versatile Practice Perspective
30(3)
The Mission of Social Work
33(1)
Caring
33(1)
Curing
33(1)
Changing the Society
34(1)
Defining Social Work
34(3)
The Definition of Social Work
35(2)
Basic Elements and Goals of Social Work Practice
37(1)
Knowledge Requirements of the Social Worker
37(1)
Social Work Practice Approaches
37(4)
Traditional Practice Methods
38(1)
Multimethod Practice Approach
39(1)
Generalist Practice Approach
39(1)
Specialist Practice Approach
40(1)
Social Workers: Their Many Faces
41(5)
Career Patterns of Social Workers
41(2)
The Social Worker's Knowledge, Values, and Skills
43(1)
Characteristics of Today's Social Workers
43(3)
Employment Projections for Social Workers
46(1)
Concluding Comment
46(5)
The Emergence of Social Work as a Profession
51(19)
Prefatory Comment
51(1)
The Nature of Professions
51(2)
Helping Professions: A Response to Human Need
53(2)
Social Work as a Profession: A Historical Perspective
55(12)
From Volunteers to an Occupation (Prior to 1915)
59(3)
Professional Emergence (1915-1950)
62(2)
Consolidating the Gains (1950-1970)
64(1)
Turning Away from the Elitist Professional Model (1970-Present)
65(2)
Concluding Comment
67(3)
Part Two SOCIAL WORK CAREER OPTIONS 70(70)
Entry to the Social Work Profession
73(22)
Prefatory Comment
73(1)
Issues in Social Work Preparation and Employment
74(4)
Education and Accreditation
75(1)
Professional Certification
75(1)
Job Classification
76(1)
Licensing or State Regulation of Social Work Practice
77(1)
Professional Standards
77(1)
Options for Human Service Practice
78(4)
Volunteers
78(1)
Nonprofessional Service Providers
79(1)
Other Baccalaureate-Level Disciplines
80(2)
Professional Social Work Practice
82(8)
The Basic Professiona
83(3)
The Specialized Professional
86(3)
The Independent Professional
89(1)
The Advanced Professional
90(1)
Concluding Comment
90(5)
Fields of Social Work Practice
95(24)
Prefatory Comment
95(2)
Aging
97(1)
Alcohol and Substance Abuse
98(1)
Children and Youth
99(3)
Adoption and Services to Unmarried Parents
100(1)
Foster Care
100(1)
Residential Care
101(1)
Support in Own Home
101(1)
Protective Services
101(1)
Youth Services
102(1)
Community/Neighborhood
102(2)
Community Organization
103(1)
Community Planning
103(1)
Community Development
103(1)
Corrections/Criminal Justice
104(1)
Disabilities (Physical/Mental)
104(1)
Education and Training
105(1)
Family Services
106(2)
Family Counseling
106(1)
Family Life Education
107(1)
Family Planning
107(1)
Income Maintenance
108(3)
Public Assistance
108(2)
Social Insurances
110(1)
Other Income Maintenance Programs
110(1)
Medical and Health Care
111(1)
Mental Health and Illness
111(2)
Outpatient Services
112(1)
Inpatient Services
112(1)
Private Practice
113(1)
Occupational Social Work
113(1)
Schools
114(1)
Concluding Comment
115(4)
Settings for Social Work Practice
119(21)
Prefatory Comment
119(1)
Characteristics of Practice Settings
120(6)
Government Sector Settings
121(1)
Voluntary (Nonprofit) Sector Settings
122(1)
Business Sector Settings
123(3)
Issues Affecting Agency-Based Practice
126(8)
Accommodating Horizontal and Vertical Influences
126(1)
Balancing Efficiency and Effectiveness
127(1)
Accommodating the Professional Model
128(2)
Engaging in Teamwork and Interprofessional Practice
130(1)
Succeeding as a Social Worker in an Agency Structure
130(2)
Determining the Status of Social Work
132(1)
Advantages of Agency-Based Practice
133(1)
Issues in Private Practice
134(4)
The Organization of Private Practice
134(2)
Concerns Related to Private Practice
136(1)
Advantages of Private Practice
137(1)
Concluding Comment
138(2)
Part Three THE PRACTICE OF SOCIAL WORK 140(102)
Values and Ethics in Social Work
143(36)
Prefatory Comment
143(1)
The Nature of Values
144(2)
The Place of Values in Social Work
146(1)
Social Values in U.S. Society
147(1)
Values Held by Social Workers
148(5)
An Illustration of Values in Social Work Practice
153(4)
Examples of Ethical Issues in Social Work Practice
157(1)
Concluding Comment
158(3)
NASW ``Code of Ethics''
161(18)
Competencies Required for Social Work Practice Today
179(34)
Prefatory Comment
179(1)
The Competencies Required for Social Work Practice
180(30)
The Universal Social Work Competencies
181(5)
Frequently Utilized Social Work Competencies
186(10)
Competencies Occasionally Needed by Social Workers
196(11)
Low Utilization Competencies for Most Social Workers
207(3)
Concluding Comment
210(3)
Prevention as a New Direction: The Future of Social Work
213(29)
Prefatory Comment
213(1)
Prevention: An Evolving Concept for going into the Twenty-First Century
213(3)
Prevention
214(2)
Preventing Treatment Abuse with At-Risk Populations
216(3)
Gang Violence and Homicide Prevention
219(10)
Educational Prevention Models
221(1)
Court- and Community-Based Programs
222(1)
Gang Homicide Psychosocial Prevention Models
223(6)
Advocacy, Empowerment, and Prevention
229(3)
Class Action Social Work and Prevention
232(4)
Concluding Comment
236(6)
Part Four SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS 242(2)
SECTION A AN OVERVIEW OF SPECIAL POPULATIONS 244(39)
Ecosystems Model
245(6)
Social Work Practice with Speical Populations
251(32)
Prefatory Comment
251(1)
Societally Induced Stressors Affecting Special Populations
252(2)
The Special Populations
254(20)
Women
254(2)
The Elderly
256(2)
Minorities
258(6)
Increasing Incarceration of People
264(4)
The Homeless
268(1)
People with Disabilities
269(1)
Police Brutality Victims
270(4)
Concluding Comment
274(9)
SECTION B SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS OF SPECIAL POPULATIONS 283(116)
Social Work Practice with Women
285(28)
Prefatory Comment
285(1)
Current Demographics
286(2)
Health and Mental Health Risk Factors
287(1)
Ecosystems Perspective
288(7)
Cultural Factors
288(1)
Environmental-Structural Factors
289(3)
The Family
292(2)
The Individual
294(1)
Intervention Strategies
295(10)
Micro Practice with Women
296(3)
Macro Practice with Women
299(1)
Micro Practice with a Battered Woman
300(3)
Macro Practice on Behalf of Battered Women
303(2)
Emerging Issues and Trends
305(1)
Concluding Comment
306(7)
Social Work Practice with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual People
313(34)
Prefatory Comment
313(1)
Current Demographics
314(3)
Defining Homosexuality
314(2)
Population Characteristics
316(1)
Ecosystems Framework
317(10)
Historical Factors
318(1)
Environmental-Structural Factors
319(1)
Culture
320(2)
Family Factors
322(2)
Individual Factors
324(3)
Macro Practice with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual People
327(2)
Micro Practice with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual People
329(7)
Common Problems
330(3)
Working with Couples
333(2)
Working with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Parents
335(1)
Working with Older Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals
336(1)
Emerging Issues and Trends
336(3)
Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Professionals
337(1)
Impact of AIDS
338(1)
Concluding Comment
339(8)
Social Work Practice with the Elderly
347(28)
Prefatory Comment
347(1)
General Population Figures
348(4)
Sex Ratios
349(1)
Racial and Ethnic Diversity
350(1)
Income and Assets
350(1)
Educational Background
351(1)
Health Status and Needs
351(1)
Ecosystems Model Analysis
352(6)
Historical Factors
353(1)
Environmental-Structural Factors
354(1)
Culture
355(1)
Family Issues
356(1)
Individual Issues
357(1)
Intervention Strategies with the Elderly
358(1)
Mental Health and the Elderly
359(8)
Micro Practice with the Elderly
361(4)
Macro Practice with the Elderly
365(2)
Emerging Issues and Trends
367(3)
Economic Improvements
367(1)
Housing Improvements
368(1)
Enhancing Health: The Need for Continuing Care
369(1)
Concluding Comment
370(5)
Social Work Practice with People with Disabilities
375(24)
Prefatory Comment
375(1)
Social Work Practice with People with Disabilities
375(2)
Defining Disability
377(8)
Demographic Considerations
378(7)
Other Risks Associated with Disability
385(1)
Disability and the Minority Model
385(2)
Societal Responses to Disability
387(3)
Social Workers and People with Disabilities
388(2)
The Ecosystems Model and People with Disabilities
390(4)
Emerging Issues for Social Work Practice with People with Disabilities
394(1)
Concluding Comment
395(4)
SECTION C THE RURAL/URBAN CONTEXT OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 399(63)
Social Work Practice in Rural Areas: Appalachia as a Case Example
401(28)
Prefatory Comment
401(1)
Characteristics of the Rural United States
402(4)
The Land
403(1)
The Economy
403(1)
The People
404(2)
The Communities
406(1)
Social Welfare in Rural Areas
406(2)
Implications for Social Work Practice in Rural Areas
408(2)
Micro Practice in Rural Areas
409(1)
Macro Practice in Rural Areas
410(1)
Rural Social Work Practice in Appalachia
410(7)
Characteristics of Appalachia
411(6)
Social Welfare in Rural Appalachia
417(6)
Micro Practice in Appalachia
419(2)
Macro Practice in Appalachia
421(2)
Concluding Comment
423(6)
Urban Gang Violence: A Psychosocial Crisis
429(33)
Prefatory Comment
429(2)
The History of Gangs
431(2)
The Prevalence of Gangs
433(1)
Theories of Gangs
433(2)
Types of Gangs
435(2)
Age Levels
437(1)
Homicide as a Health/Mental Health Concern
438(1)
Etiology of Homicide
439(3)
Biological Causes
439(1)
Developmental-Psychological Causes
440(1)
Sociocultural-Environmental Causes
440(2)
Relationship of Victim to Assailant
442(3)
Gang Intervention Approaches
445(7)
Law Enforcement-Institutionalization Approach
446(1)
Community Organization Approach
447(2)
Social-Recreational Approach
449(1)
Spiritual-Religious Approach
450(1)
Street Worker-Counselor Approach
450(1)
Sociopolitical Approach
451(1)
Implications for Social Work
452(4)
Micro Practice: The Individual and the Family
452(2)
Micro Practice: The Group
454(1)
Macro Practice: The Community
455(1)
Concluding Comment
456(6)
SECTION D RACE, ETHNICITY, AND CULTURE IN SPECIAL POPULATIONS 462(122)
Social Work Practice with Asian Americans
465(20)
Prefatory Comment
465(1)
Current Demographics
466(3)
Population
466(1)
Socioeconomic Issues
466(1)
Health and Mental Health Risk Factors
467(2)
Ecosystems Perspective
469(5)
Historical Influences
469(2)
Environmental-Structural Factors
471(1)
Asian American Culture
471(1)
Family Structure
472(2)
The Individual
474(1)
Intervention Strategies
474(4)
Mental Health and Social Services for Asian Americans
474(1)
Traditional Asian American Approach to Treatment of Psychological Problems
475(1)
Help-Seeking Patterns and Behaviors
476(1)
Micro Social Work Practice
476(2)
Macro Social Work Practice
478(2)
Concluding Comment
480(5)
Social Work Practice with American Indians and Alaskan Natives
485(28)
Prefatory Comment
485(1)
Current Demographics
486(3)
Socioeconomic Issues
486(1)
Education
487(1)
Health and Mental Health Issues
487(2)
Native American Youth
489(1)
Ecosystems Framework
489(5)
Historical Influences
490(1)
Environmental-Structural Factors
491(1)
Native American Cultural Considerations
492(1)
Family Considerations
493(1)
Individual Considerations
494(1)
Micro Social Work Practice with American Indians
494(10)
Relationship Strategies
494(1)
Intervention Strategies
495(2)
Casework Intervention
497(4)
Social Group Work and Family Interventions
501(3)
Macro Social Work Practice with Native Americans
504(3)
Native American Urban Community Case Study
506(1)
The Future
507(1)
Concluding Comment
508(5)
Social Work Practice with Mexican Americans
513(28)
Prefatory Comment
513(1)
Mexican Americans: A Heterogeneous Population
514(2)
Demographic Profile
516(2)
Mexican Americans in Social Work Literature
518(2)
Ecosystems Model
520(8)
Historical Factors
521(2)
Environmental-Structural Factors
523(2)
Cultural Factors: Barrio Service Systems
525(1)
Family Factors
525(2)
Individual Factors
527(1)
Micro Social Work Practice
528(3)
Macro Social Work Practice
531(3)
Concluding Comment
534(7)
Social Work Practice with African Americans
541(22)
Prefatory Comment
541(1)
Responding to African American Needs
542(1)
Who Are the African Americans?
542(3)
African American Culture and Lifestyle
545(5)
Language and Communication
545(2)
Family Structures and Dynamics
547(1)
Religion
548(1)
Relationships with Social Institutions
549(1)
Social Work Intervention
550(7)
Theoretical Frameworks
551(2)
Presenting Problems
553(1)
Assessing the Problems
554(1)
Establishing a Working Relationship
555(2)
The Problem-Solving Process
557(1)
Concluding Comment
558(5)
Social Work Practice with Puerto Ricans
563(21)
Prefatory Comment
563(1)
Current Demographics
564(3)
Population
564(1)
Education
564(1)
Socioeconomic Characteristics of Puerto Ricans: 1980-1990
565(1)
Characteristics of Poverty
565(2)
Health-Mental Health Risk Factors
567(5)
Discussion of Cases
571(1)
General Data on Health Care and Puerto Ricans
572(1)
Beliefs and Practices That Influence Puerto Ricans' Health
573(1)
Ecosystems Perspective
574(6)
Historical Influences
574(2)
Environmental-Structural Factors
576(1)
Puerto Rican Culture
577(2)
Family Structure
579(1)
Intervention Strategies
580(1)
Concluding Comment
580(4)
Part Five THE SOCIAL WORKER IN ACTION 584(37)
The Social Worker in Action: A High School Homicide Case
587(34)
Prefatory Comment
587(1)
Background to the Case
587(3)
Homicides Are in Every Community
588(1)
Criminal versus Felony Homicides
588(1)
The Olas Family Services Center
588(1)
A School Homicide Shocks Any Community
589(1)
Social Work Psychosocial Intervention
590(2)
Mobilizing the Agency and Staff for Action
590(1)
Crises Breed Mixed Emotions
591(1)
Building Staff Cohesion
591(1)
Social Workers Respond to the Challenge
592(1)
Applying Crisis Theory to the Tasks at Hand
592(1)
Natural versus Man-Made Disasters
592(1)
The Unique, Subjective Perception and Response to a Crisis
593(1)
Biopsychosocial Considerations in Responses to Crises
593(1)
Mobilizing Related Mental Health Disciplines
593(2)
Developing a School-Based Intervention Strategy
594(1)
Reaching Out to Related High-Risk Groups
594(1)
Developing an Appropriate Clinical Intervention
594(1)
Dealing with the Media
595(3)
Confronting Rumors
595(1)
Fears Immobilize School Children
595(1)
Presenting Accurate Facts
596(1)
Involving the Elected Officials
596(1)
Contacting the Minority Communities
596(1)
Cooperation by the Media Is Rewarded
597(1)
One Suspect Eludes Arrest
597(1)
A Town Tries to Heal
598(4)
A Right to a Speedy Trial
598(1)
The Death Penalty Phase of the Trial
599(3)
The Report: A Psychosocial Evaluation
602(7)
Part One: Data and Diagnosis
603(4)
Part Two: The Defendant's Value to Society
607(2)
The Report Is Challenged by the People
609(3)
Social Workers Can't Diagnose
609(1)
The District Attorney Scores Major Rulings
609(1)
Reported History versus Corroboration
610(1)
Clinical High-Risk versus Courtroom High-Risk Perception
610(1)
The Defendant's Value to Society?
611(1)
The Competition
611(1)
The Verdict
611(1)
A Social Worker's Work Is Never Finished
612(5)
Regenerating Interest after a Crisis Is Over
613(4)
Concluding Comment
617(4)
Name Index 621(2)
Subject Index 623


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