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Source Book in Chinese Philosophy,9780691019642

Source Book in Chinese Philosophy

by
ISBN13:

9780691019642

ISBN10:
0691019649
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/1/1969
Publisher(s):
Princeton Univ Pr
List Price: $49.95

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Summary

A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy is a milestone along the complex and difficult road to significant understanding by Westerners of the Asian peoples and a monumental contribution to the cause of philosophy. It is the first anthology of Chinese philosophy to cover its entire historical development. It provides substantial selections from all the great thinkers and schools in every period--ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary--and includes in their entirety some of the most important classical texts. It deals with the fundamental and technical as well as the more general aspects of Chinese thought. With its new translation of source materials (some translated for the first time), its explanatory aids where necessary, its thoroughgoing scholarly documentation, this volume will be an indispensable guide for scholars, for college students, for serious readers interested in knowing the real China.

Table of Contents

Foreword vii
Preface ix
Acknowledgments xiii
Chronology of Dynasties xv
Chronology of Philosophers xvi
Abbreviations and Abridgments 2(1)
The Growth of Humanism
3(11)
Introduction
3(11)
Ancestors and the Lord on High
5(1)
The Mandate of Heaven, Ancestors, and Virtue
6(2)
The ``Great Norm,''
8(3)
Spirits, the Soul, and Immortality
11(3)
The Humanism of Confucius*
14(35)
Introduction
14(4)
Selections from the Analects
18(31)
Idealistic Confucianism: Mencius*
49(35)
Introduction
49(2)
The Book of Mencius: Book 6, Part 1
51(9)
Additional Selections
60(24)
Moral and Social Programs: The Great Learning
84(11)
Introduction
84(1)
The Great Learning
85(10)
Spiritual Dimensions: The Doctrine of the Mean*
95(20)
Introduction
95(2)
The Doctrine of the Mean
97(18)
Naturalistic Confucianism: Hsun Tzu
115(21)
Introduction
115(21)
``On Nature,''
116(8)
``On the Rectification of Names,''
124(4)
``The Nature of Man is Evil,''
128(8)
The Natural Way of Lao Tzu*
136(41)
Introduction
136(3)
The Lao Tzu (Tao-te ching)
139(38)
The Mystical Way of Chuang Tzu
177(34)
Introduction
177(34)
``The Equality of Things,''
179(12)
``The Great Teacher,''
191(11)
Additional Selections
The Nature and Reality of Tao
202(1)
Tao Everywhere
203(1)
Constant Flux
203(1)
Evolution
204(1)
Tao as Transformation and One
204(1)
Nature vs. Man
205(2)
Calmness of Mind
207(1)
Sageliness and Kingliness
208(1)
The Equality of Life and Death
209(1)
Subjectivity
209(1)
The Inner Spirit
210(1)
Mo Tzu's Doctrines of Universal Love, Heaven, and Social Welfare
211(21)
Introduction
211(21)
``Universal Love, Pt. 2,''
213(4)
``The Will of Heaven, Pt. 1,''
217(4)
``Attack on Fatalism, Pt. 1,''
221(5)
Additional Selections
Utilitarianism
226(1)
The Condemnation of War
227(1)
The Condemnation of Wasteful Musical Activities
227(1)
The Condemnation of Elaborate Funerals
228(1)
Elevating the Worthy to Government Positions
229(1)
Agreement with the Superior
230(2)
Debates on Metaphysical Concepts: The Logicians
232(12)
Introduction
232(12)
The Paradoxes of Hui Shih and the Debaters
233(2)
The Kung-sun Lung Tzu
``On the White Horse,''
235(2)
``On Marks (chih) and Things,''
237(1)
``On the Explanation of Change,''
238(2)
``On Hardness and Whiteness,''
240(3)
``On Names and Actuality,''
243(1)
The Yin Yang School
244(7)
Introduction
244(7)
Tsou Yen
246(2)
Yin and Yang
248(1)
The Five Agents
249(2)
Legalism
251(11)
Introduction
251(11)
The Synthesis of Legalistic Doctrine
252(8)
Interpretations of Tao
260(2)
The Philosophy of Change
262(9)
Introduction
262(9)
Selections from the Commentaries
264(1)
Selections from the ``Appended Remarks,'' Pt. 1
265(3)
Selections from the ``Appended Remarks,'' Pt. 2
268(1)
Selections from ``Remarks on Certain Trigrams,''
269(2)
Yin Yang Confucianism: Tung Chung-shu
271(18)
Introduction
271(18)
The Profound Examination of Names and Appellations,''
273(6)
``The Meaning of the Five Agents,''
279(1)
``The Correspondence of Man and the Numerical Categories of Heaven,''
280(2)
``Things of the Same Kind Activate Each Other,''
282(2)
Additional Selections
The Origin (Yuan)
284(1)
Humanity and Righteousness
285(1)
Humanity and Wisdom
286(1)
Historical Cycles
287(2)
Taoistic Confucianism: Yang Hsiung
289(3)
Introduction
289(1)
Selections
289(3)
The Naturalism of Wang Ch'ung
292(13)
Introduction
292(13)
``On Original Nature,''
293(3)
``On Spontaneity,''
296(3)
``A Treatise on Death,''
299(3)
Additional Selections
Accident vs. Necessity
302(1)
Strange Phenomena
303(1)
Fate
303(1)
The Equality of Past and Present
304(1)
The Taoism of Huai-nan Tzu
305(4)
Introduction
305(4)
The Nature of Tao
305(1)
The Beginning of Reality
306(1)
Centrifugal Cosmogony
307(2)
Negative Taoism in the Lieh Tzu and the ``Yang Chu Chapter''
309(5)
Introduction
309(5)
The ``Yang Chu Chapter,''
310(1)
The Lieh Tzu
Skepticism
311(1)
Fatalism
312(2)
Neo-Taoism
314(22)
Introduction
314(22)
Wang Pi's Simple Exemplifications of the Principles of the Book of Changes
318(2)
Wang Pi's Commentary on the Book of Changes
320(1)
Wang Pi's Commentary on the Lao Tzu
321(3)
Ho Yen's Treatise on Tao
324(1)
Ho Yen's Treatise on the Nameless
324(2)
Kuo Hsiang's Commentary on the Chuang Tzu
326(10)
The Seven Early Buddhist Schools
336(7)
Introduction
336(2)
Selections
338(5)
Seng-chao's Doctrine of Reality
343(14)
Introduction
343(14)
``The Immutability of Things,''
344(6)
``The Emptiness of the Unreal,''
350(7)
The Philosophy of Emptiness: Chi-tsang of the Three-Treatise School
357(13)
Introduction
357(13)
The Two Levels of Truth
360(1)
Causes and Effects
361(3)
The Four Subsidiary Causes
364(1)
Existence, Nonexistence, and Emptiness
365(3)
Substance and Function
368(2)
Buddhist Idealism: Hsuan-tsang of the Consciousness-Only School
370(26)
Introduction
370(26)
The Nonexistence of the Self
374(3)
The Nonexistence of Dharmas
377(2)
The First Transformation of Consciousness
379(4)
The Second Transformation of Consciousness
383(1)
The Third Transformation of Consciousness
384(2)
Consciousness-Only
386(1)
Nine Objections to the Consciousness-Only Doctrine and Their Answers
387(6)
The Three Natures of Being, Three Natures of Non-being, and Thusness
393(3)
The T'ien-t'ai Philosophy of Perfect Harmony
396(10)
Introduction
396(10)
The Various Aspects of the Mind
398(5)
Three Ages as an Instant; Substance and Function
403(1)
The Function of Concentration and Insight
404(2)
The One-and-All Philosophy: Fa-tsang of the Hua-yen School
406(19)
Introduction
406(19)
Treatise on the Golden Lion
409(5)
Hundred Gates to the Sea of Ideas of the Flowery Splendor Scripture
``All that Come Into Existence Through Causation End Together in Quiescence,''
414(6)
``Harmonious Combination and Spontaneity,''
420(5)
The Zen (Ch'an) School of Sudden Enlightenment
425(25)
Introduction
425(25)
The Platform Scripture
430(10)
The Recorded Conversations of Shen-hui
440(4)
The Recorded Conversations of Zen Master I-hsuan
444(6)
The Revival of Confucianism: Han Yu and Li Ao
450(10)
Introduction
450(10)
An Inquiry on Human Nature
451(3)
An Inquiry on the Way (Tao)
454(2)
The Recovery of the Nature
456(4)
The Neo-Confucian Metaphysics and Ethics in Chou Tun-i*
460(21)
Introduction
460(21)
An Explanation of the Diagram of the Great Ultimate
463(2)
Penetrating the Book of Changes
465(16)
The Numerical and Objective Tendencies in Shao Yung*
481(14)
Introduction
481(3)
Supreme Principles Governing the World
484(11)
Chang Tsai's Philosophy of Material Force*
495(23)
Introduction
495(23)
The Western Inscription
497(3)
Correcting Youthful Ignorance
``Great Harmony,''
500(7)
``Enlightenment Resulting from Sincerity,''
507(7)
Additional Selections
514(4)
The Idealistic Tendency in Ch'eng Hao*
518(26)
Introduction
518(26)
``On Understanding the Nature of Jen (Humanity),''
523(2)
``Reply to Master Heng-ch'u's Letter on Calming Human Nature,''
525(2)
Selected Sayings
527(17)
The Rationalistic Tendency in Ch'eng I*
544(28)
Introduction
544(28)
``A Treatise on What Yen Tzu Loved to Learn,''
547(3)
``Letter in Reply to Yang Shih's Letter on the Western Inscription,''
550(1)
Selected Sayings
551(21)
The Unity of Mind and Principle in Lu Hsiang-shan*
572(16)
Introduction
572(2)
Selections
574(14)
The Great Synthesis in Chu Hsi*
588(66)
Introduction
588(66)
Treatises
``A Treatise on Jen,''
593(4)
``A Treatise on Ch'eng Ming-tao's Discourse on the Nature,''
597(3)
``First Letter to the Gentlemen of Hunan on Equilibrium and Harmony,''
600(2)
``A Treatise on the Examination of the Mind,''
602(3)
The Complete Works
Moral Cultivation
605(7)
The Relation between the Nature of Man and Things and Their Destiny
612(2)
The Nature of Man and Things
614(6)
The Nature of Man and the Nature of Things Compared
620(3)
Physical Nature
623(3)
Destiny
626(2)
The Mind
628(2)
The Mind, the Nature, and the Feelings
630(2)
Jen
632(2)
Principle (Li) and Material Force (Ch'i)
634(4)
The Great Ultimate
638(3)
Heaven and Earth
641(2)
Spiritual Beings and Spiritual Forces
643(3)
Buddhism
646(8)
Dynamic Idealism in Wang Yang-ming*
654(38)
Introduction
654(38)
Inquiry on the Great Learning
659(8)
Instructions for Practical Living
667(25)
The Materialism of Wang Fu-chih
692(11)
Introduction
692(11)
The World of Concrete Things
694(2)
Substance and Function
696(1)
Being and Non-being
697(1)
Principle and Material Force
697(1)
Unceasing Growth and Man's Nature and Destiny
698(2)
The Principle of Nature and Human Desires
700(1)
History and Government
701(2)
Practical Confucianism in Yen Yuan
703(6)
Introduction
703(6)
In Defense of Physical Nature
704(3)
The Identity of Principle and Material Force
707(1)
Learning through Experience
707(2)
Tai Chen's Philosophy of Principle as Order
709(14)
Introduction
709(14)
On Principle (Li)
711(6)
On Nature
717(2)
On Capacity
719(1)
On Humanity, Righteousness, Propriety, and Wisdom
719(1)
On the Variety of Circumstances
720(3)
K'ang Yu-wei's Philosophy of Great Unity
723(14)
Introduction
723(14)
The Three Ages
725(2)
Confucius' Institutional Reforms
727(2)
The Mind that Cannot Bear to See the Suffering of Others
729(1)
The Age of Great Unity
730(4)
Humanity
734(3)
The Philosophy of Humanity (Jen) in T'an Ssu-t'ung
737(6)
Introduction
737(6)
Ether and Humanity
738(2)
The Principle of Nature and Human Desires
740(1)
Neither Production nor Extinction
741(1)
Daily Renovation
741(2)
Chang Tung-sun's Theory of Knowledge
743(8)
Introduction
743(2)
Selections
745(6)
The New Rationalistic Confucianism: Fung Yu-lan
751(12)
Introduction
751(12)
The World and Principle
755(2)
Principle and Material Force
757(1)
Tao, Substance and Function, and Universal Operation
758(2)
Principle and the Nature
760(1)
Serving Heaven and Jen (Humanity)
761(2)
The New Idealistic Confucianism: Hsiung Shih-li
763(10)
Introduction
763(10)
``Closing and Opening,''
765(1)
The Unity of Principle and Material Force
766(2)
The Mind and Humanity (Jen)
768(1)
The Unity of Substance and Function
769(4)
Chinese Philosophy in Communist China
773(10)
Introduction
773(10)
The Nature of the History of Chinese Philosophy
776(2)
The Chinese Philosophical Heritage
778(2)
Guidance for Future Developments
780(3)
Appendix: On Translating Certain Chinese Philosophical Terms 783(10)
Bibliography 793(20)
A Glossary of Chinese Characters 813(20)
Index 833


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