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Sources : Notable Selections in Human Development

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780072404388

ISBN10:
0072404388
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/27/2000
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill/Dushkin

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Summary

Over 40 selections of enduring intellectual value--book excerpts, classic articles, and research studies--that have shaped the study of human development and our contemporary understanding of it. Sources provides the opportunity for readers to encounter many of the greatest thinkers in human development at first hand. The book includes carefully edited selections from the works of the most distinguished observers of human development, past and present. Students of human development will appreciate the broad range of coverage, the logic of the organization, and the accessibility of the material within this volume. Students can use the student Web site (www.dushkin.com/online/) for access to additional support tools for Sources titles.

Table of Contents

Part 1. Theories of Developmental Psychology

CHAPTER 1. The Grand Theories

1.1. Sigmund Freud, from An Outline of Psychoanalysis

1.2. Jean Piaget, from "The Genetic Approach to the Psychology of Thought", Journal of Educational Psychology

1.3. Erik Erikson, from Childhood and Society, 2d ed.

1.4. Lawrence Kohlberg, from "The Child as a Moral Philosopher", Psychology Today

1.5. Carol Gilligan, from In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development

1.6. Howard Gardner and Joseph Walters, from "A Rounded Version", in Howard Gardner, Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice

1.7. William Wordsworth, from The Works of William Wordsworth

CHAPTER 2. Non-Western Classics

2.1. Ken Wilber, from "The Spectrum of Development", in Ken Wilber, Jack Engler, and Daniel P. Brown, eds., Transformations of Consciousness: Conventional and Contemplative Perspectives on Development

2.2. Bahá'u'lláh, from The Seven Valleys and the Four Valleys, trans. Marzieh Gail

2.3. K'ung Fu-Tzu (Confucius), from The Great Learning, in Wing-Tsit Chan, comp. and trans., A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy

CHAPTER 3. Genes and Environmental Influence

3.1. Anne Anastasi, from "Heredity, Environment, and the Question `How?'" Psychological Review

3.2. Alexander Thomas, Stella Chess, and Herbert G. Birch, from "The Origin of Personality", Scientific American

Part 2. Infancy and Early Childhood

CHAPTER 4. Development in Infancy

4.1. Jean Piaget, from The Origins of Intelligence in Children, trans. Margaret Cook

4.2. Mary D. Salter Ainsworth, from "Infant-Mother Attachment", American Psychologist

CHAPTER 5. Development in Early Childhood

5.1. Jean Piaget, Bärbel Inhelder, and Edith Mayer, from "The Co-ordination of Perspectives", in Jean Piaget and Bärbel Inhelder, The Child's Conception of Space, trans. F. J. Langdon and J. L. Lunzer

5.2. L. S. Vygotsky, from Thought and Language, ed. and trans. Eugenia Hanfmann and Gertrude Vakar

5.3. Mildred B. Parten, from "Social Participation Among Pre-School Children", The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology

5.4. Albert Bandura, Dorothea Ross, and Sheila A. Ross, from "Imitation of Film-Mediated Aggressive Models", The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology

5.5. Diana Baumrind, from "Child Care Practices Anteceding Three Patterns of Preschool Behavior", Genetic Psychology Monographs

Part 3. Middle Childhood

CHAPTER 6. Cognitive Development

6.1. B. F. Skinner, from About Behaviorism

6.2. Noam Chomsky, from "A Review of B. F. Skinner's Verbal Behavior," Language

6.3. Jean Piaget, from The Child's Conception of Number

CHAPTER 7. Social and Personality Development

7.1. Robert L. Selman and Anne P. Selman, from "Children's Ideas About Friendship: A New Theory", Psychology Today

7.2. Jean Piaget, from The Moral Judgment of the Child, trans. Marjorie Gabain

7.3. Beatrice Whiting and Carolyn Pope Edwards, from "A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Sex Differences in the Behavior of Children Aged Three Through Eleven", The Journal of Social Psychology

Part 4. Adolescence

CHAPTER 8. Physical and Cognitive Development

8.1. Mary Cover Jones, from "Psychological Correlates of Somatic Development", Child Development

8.2. Jean Piaget, from "The Mental Development of the Child", in Jean Piaget, Six Psychological Studies, trans. Anita Tenzer

CHAPTER 9. Social and Personality Development

9.1. James E. Marcia, from "Development and Validation of Ego-Identity Status", Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

9.2. Margaret Mead, from Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilisation

9.3. Michael L. Penn and Debra J. Witkin, from "Pathognomic Versus Developmentally Appropriate Self-Focus During Adolescence: Theoretical Concerns and Clinical Implications", Psychotherapy

Part 5. Early and Middle Adulthood

CHAPTER 10. Cognitive Development

10.1. Mary Field Belenky et al., from Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind

10.2. John L. Horn and Raymond B. Cattell, from "Age Differences in Primary Mental Ability Factors", Journal of Gerontology

CHAPTER 11. Social and Personality Development

11.1. Daniel J. Levinson, from "A Conception of Adult Development", American Psychologist

11.2. Abraham H. Maslow, from Motivation and Personality, 3rd ed.

11.3. Roger Gould, from "Adult Life Stages: Growth Toward Self-Tolerance", Psychology Today

Part 6. Late Adulthood

CHAPTER 12. Development During the Elder Years

12.1. Paul B. Baltes and K. Warner Schaie, from "Aging and IQ: The Myth of the Twilight Years", Psychology Today

12.2. James W. Fowler, from Stages of Faith: The Psychology of Human Development and the Quest for Meaning

12.3. Erik Erikson, from "Reflections on the Last Stage--And the First", Psychoanalytic Study of the Child

12.4. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, from On Death and Dying



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