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Sources in Patterns of World History : Volume Two Since 1400,9780199846184

Sources in Patterns of World History : Volume Two Since 1400

by ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780199846184

ISBN10:
0199846189
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/27/2012
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press, USA
List Price: $20.21

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Summary

Each volume of Sources for Patterns of World History includes approximately 200 text and visual sources in world history, organized to match the chapter organization of Patterns of World History. Each source is accompanied by a headnote and reading questions. FREE in a bundle, contact your Oxford University Press representative for details, or call 800-280-0280.

Table of Contents

Primary Sources: How to Read Them and Why They Are Important in World Historyp. 1
The Rise of Empires in the Americas, 600-1550p. 6
The Founding of Tenochtitlánp. 6
Human Sacrifice by the Aztecsp. 8
Machu Picchup. 9
The Inca Censusp. 10
The Ottoman-Habsburg Struggle and European Overseas Expansion, 1450-1600p. 12
The Tribute of Childrenp. 12
A European Ambassador Reports on the Ottomansp. 14
An Ottoman Travel Journalp. 15
The Journal of Christopher Columbusp. 18
Renaissance, Reformation, and the New Science in Europe, 1450-1700p. 20
Marsilio Ficino, "Letter to Paul of Middelburg"p. 21
Laura Cereta to Cardinal Ascanio Maria Sforzap. 21
John Calvin, Prayer from Commentary on Hoseap. 22
Galileo Galilei, Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systemsp. 24
Antony van Leeuwenhoek's "Animalcules"p. 25
Galileo's Views of the Moonp. 26
Peter the Great, "Correspondence with Alexis, 1715p. 27
New Patterns in New Worlds: Colonialism and Indigenous Responses in the Americas, 1500-1800p. 30
Aztecs Recount the Beginning of the War with the Conquistadorsp. 30
Letter from Hernando de Sotop. 31
Coronado's Report to Viceroy Mendozap. 33
Increase Mather on King Philip's Deathp. 35
Reasons for Colonizing North Americap. 36
African Kingdoms, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and the Origins of Black America, 1450-1800p. 38
Leo Africanus on Timbuktup. 38
"Krotoa" from the Journal of Jan van Riebeeckp. 40
The Arab Slave Tradep. 41
An Account of the Atlantic Slave Tradep. 42
Phillis Wheatly, "To the Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth…"p. 43
Slave Market, Pernambuco, Brazil, 1824p. 44
The Mughal Empire: Muslim Rulers and Hindu Subjects, 1400-1750p. 45
The Ain-i-Akbarip. 46
The Journey to the Court of Akbarp. 47
Jahangir Debates with the Hindusp. 48
Summary of the Reasons Which Led Akbar to Renounce Islamp. 49
Akbar on Proper Behaviorp. 50
The Habits and Manners of Aurangzebp. 51
Regulating the "Inner" and the "Outer" Domains of China and Japan, 1500-1800p. 53
Buddhist World Map, 1710p. 53
The Seclusion of Japanp. 55
The Philosophy of Wang Yang-Mingp. 56
Qianlong, Letter to George IIIp. 57
Nation-States and Patterns of Culture in Europe and North America, 1750-1871p. 61
Jean Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contractp. 61
Olympe de Gouges, Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizenp. 63
Charles Maurice Talleyrand to Louis XVIIIp. 68
Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Addressp. 70
Proclamation of the German Empirep. 72
Victor Emmanuel and the Catholic Churchp. 73
Industrialization and its Discontents, 1750-1914p. 75
Adam Smith, Wealth of Nationsp. 75
John Stuart Mill, On Libertyp. 76
Frederich Engels, Condition of the Working Class in Englandp. 76
Charles Dickens, David Copperfieldp. 77
Parliamentary Report on English Female Miners, 1842p. 78
Advertisment for a Vitascope, 1896p. 80
Friedrich Nietzsche, from Beyond Good and Evilp. 83
The Challenge of Modernity: East Asia, 1750-1910p. 85
The Nanjing Treatyp. 85
A Chinese Traveler on the Marvels of Western Technologyp. 87
Jesuits in Chinap. 87
The "Opening" of Japanp. 88
The King of Siam to President Buchananp. 90
The Challenge of Modernity: The Ottoman and Russian Empires, 1683-1908p. 92
Peter the Great's Decree on Western Dressp. 93
Petyr Chaadaev, "Philosophical Letters"p. 94
A British Diplomat Comments on the Ottoman Armyp. 95
The Gulhane Decreep. 95
"Mr. Sansonov"p. 96
The Iranian and Turkish Constitutional Revolutions of 1906 and 1908p. 97
The New Imperialism in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 100
Dadabhai Naoroji on the Benefits Detriments of British Rule in Indiap. 100
The Diamond Fields of South Africa, 1872p. 102
Rudyard Kipling, "The White Man's Burden"p. 103
Edward D. Morel, The Black Man's Burdenp. 104
Raden Ayu Kartini, Letters of a Javanese Princessp. 107
Teapickers, northern Indiap. 110
Creoles and Caudillos: Latin America in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 111
Alexander Von Humboldt on New Spainp. 112
Simón de Bolivar, His Message to the Congress of Angosturap. 113
Pope Leo XIII, In Plurimisp. 114
Jose Marti, "Our America"p. 115
United States Recognition of Cuban Independencep. 118
World War and Competing Visions of Modernity to 1945p. 119
Theodore Roosevelt, "War for Righteousness"p. 119
Joseph Stalin on Liquidating the Kulaksp. 121
Critics of Industrialization: The Southern Agrariansp. 122
Mohandas Gandhi and the Quit India Movementp. 124
Mussolini Repudiates on Political Liberalism, 1923p. 125
Adolf Hitler, German Economic Goals and the Jewish Questionp. 126
Korean "Comfort Girls"p. 127
Reconstruction, the Cold War, and Decolonization, 1945-1962p. 130
The Marshall Planp. 131
Dwight D. Eisenhower on the Suez Crisisp. 133
Cuban Missile Crisisp. 134
Jawaharlal Nehru, "Why India is Non-Aligned"p. 137
Juan Perón, excerpt from The Voice of Perónp. 139
Jomo Kenyatta, from Facing ML Kenya: The Tribal Life of the Gikuyup. 141
Babies Being Weighed, North Korea, 1955p. 144
The End of the Cold War, Western Social Transformation, and the Developing World, 1963-1991p. 145
The US Civil Rights Act of 1964p. 145
National Organization for Women, Statement of Purposep. 146
The Yom Kippur/Ramadan Warp. 149
Postcolonialism in Africap. 150
Mikhail Gorbachev on the Arms Race Between the USSR and the USp. 151
The Tiananmen Square Massacre, 1989: a Poet Remembersp. 153
A Fragile Democratic-Capitalist World Order, 1991-Presentp. 157
Tim Berners Lee, "Enquire Within Upon Everything"p. 158
"Death by Government"p. 159
Rachel Carson, from Silent Springp. 161
The Sovereign Debt Crisisp. 161
James Tooley, from The Beautiful Treep. 163
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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