9780691000671

A Spinoza Reader

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780691000671

  • ISBN10:

    0691000670

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1994-02-07
  • Publisher: Princeton Univ Pr

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Summary

This anthology of the work of Baruch de Spinoza (1632-1677) presents the text of Spinoza's masterwork, theEthics, in what is now the standard translation by Edwin Curley. Also included are selections from other works by Spinoza, chosen by Curley to make theEthicseasier to understand, and a substantial introduction that gives an overview of Spinoza's life and the main themes of his philosophy. Perfect for course use, theSpinoza Readeris a practical tool with which to approach one of the world's greatest but most difficult thinkers, a passionate seeker of the truth who has been viewed by some as an atheist and by others as a religious mystic. The anthology begins with the opening section of theTreatise on the Emendation of the Intellect, which has always moved readers by its description of the young Spinoza's spiritual quest, his dissatisfaction with the things people ordinarily strive for--wealth, honor, and sensual pleasure--and his hope that the pursuit of knowledge would lead him to discover the true good. The emphasis throughout these selections is on metaphysical, epistemological, and religious issues: the existence and nature of God, his relation to the world, the nature of the human mind and its relation to the body, and the theory of demonstration, axioms, and definitions. For each of these topics, the editor supplements the rigorous discussions in theEthicswith informal treatments from Spinoza's other works.

Table of Contents

Introduction
I. Spinoza's Life and Philosophy ix(24)
II. Bibliographical Note xxxiii(1)
III. Abbreviations and Other Conventions xxxiv
PRELIMINARIES 3(82)
I. A Portrait of the Philosopher as a Young Man
3(3)
II. A Critique of Traditional Religion
6(42)
A. On Religion and Superstition
6(4)
B. On Revelation
10(13)
C. On God as an Agent in History
23(3)
D. On Law and God as a Lawgiver
26(8)
E. On Miracles
34(6)
F. On Interpreting Scripture
40(8)
III. Fragments of a Theory of Scientific Method
48(7)
A. The Four Kinds of Knowledge
48(3)
B. Achieving Clear and Distinct Ideas
51(4)
IV. From a Non-Geometric Draft of the Ethics
55(11)
A. Of the `Attributes' Which Do Not Belong to God, and on Definition
55(2)
B. On Natura naturans
57(1)
C. On Natura naturata
58(1)
D. Of the Human Soul
58(4)
E. An Argument for Immortality
62(2)
F. A Dialogue on God's Causality
64(2)
V. An Early Attempt at Geometrizing Philosophy
66(5)
A. Spinoza to Oldenburg
66(2)
B. Oldenburg to Spinoza
68(1)
C. Spinoza to Oldenburg
69(2)
VI. Two Criticisms of Descartes
71(6)
A. On the Cartesian Circle
71(3)
B. On Descartes' Attempt to Prove God's Existence from His Own
74(3)
VII. The Study Group has Questions about Definitions
77(5)
A. Simon de Vries to Spinoza
77(2)
B. Spinoza to De Vries
79(2)
C. Spinoza to De Vries Again
81(1)
VIII. The Worm in the Blood Spinoza to Henry Oldenburg
82(3)
THE ETHICS 85(181)
I. Of God
85(30)
II. Of the Nature and Origin of the Mind
115(37)
III. Of the Origin and Nature of the Affects
152(45)
IV. Of Human Bondage, or the Powers of the Affects
197(47)
V. Of the Power of the Intellect, or on Human Freedom
244(22)
OBJECTIONS AND REPLIES 266(11)
I. Tschirnhaus on Freedom
266(1)
II. Freedom and Necessity
267(2)
III. Tschirnhaus on Problems about the Attributes and Infinite Modes
269(1)
IV. On Knowledge of Other Attributes and Examples of Infinite Modes
270(2)
V. Tschirnhaus on Knowledge of Other Attributes
272(1)
VI. Each Thing Is Expressed by Many Minds
272(1)
VII. Tschirnhaus Presses His Objection
273(1)
VIII. Spinoza Replies Again
273(1)
IX. Tschirnhaus on Deducing the Existence of Bodies
274(1)
X. On the Uselessness of Descartes' Principles of Natural Things
274(1)
XI. Tschirnhaus Presses the Objection
274(1)
XII. Spinoza's Last Reply
275(2)
Index 277

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