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Sport And Spectacle in the Ancient World

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780631229711

ISBN10:
063122971X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
9/18/2006
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell

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This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 9/18/2006.
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Summary

This work by a well-published scholar and award-winning teacher provides an introduction to the history of sport and spectacle in the ancient world from the Ancient Near East through Greek and Hellenistic times and into the Roman Empire. The book introduces readers to ancient sport history as a growing and exciting field in which scholarly advances and controversies abound. Drawing on archaeological and art historical evidence and on approaches from anthropology and social history, the author goes beyond the traditional focus on the Greek Olympics and the Roman Colosseum to examine the origins, nature and meaning of sport, the sporting activities and spectacles of earlier Mediterranean peoples, local sport and unusual contests, and much more.

Author Biography

Donald G. Kyle is Professor and Chair of History at the University of Texas at Arlington. An award-winning teacher, he has been honoured by the University as a Distinguished Teaching Fellow. He has published Athletics in Ancient Athens (Revised Edition, 1993) and Spectacles of Death in Ancient Rome (1998) and co-edited Essays on Sport History and Sport Mythology (1990). He has appeared in History Channel shows on gladiators (1996) and crime in Rome (2005) and PBS and History Channel shows on the Ancient Olympics (2004).

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments ix
Abbreviations xii
List of Figures xiv
List of Maps xvi
List of Tables xvii
Introduction: Ancient Sport History 1(197)
Why Sport History?
5(4)
Word Games: Conceptualizing Sport and Spectacle
9(2)
Challenges: Evidence, Chronology, and Modernism
11(6)
Sports and Spectacles as Cultural Performances
17(1)
Greece and Rome: Positive and Negative Classicism
18(2)
Sports as Spectacle, Spectacles as Sport
20(3)
1 Origins and Essences: Early Sport and Spectacle
23(15)
Mesopotamian Combat Sports and Running
26(2)
Egypt: From Hunting to Sporting Pharaohs
28(6)
Royal Hunts as a Near Eastern Tradition
34(2)
States and Sports, Empires and Spectacles
36(2)
2 Late Bronze Age Minoans, Hittites, and Mycenaeans
38(16)
Minoan Performances: Rites, Contests or Spectacles?
39(6)
Hittite Contests?
45(3)
Mycenaean Contests?
48(3)
A Sporting Mediterranean World
51(3)
3 Sport in Homer: Contests, Prizes, and Honor
54(18)
Funeral Games for Patroklos: Prizes and Reconciliation
57(8)
The Odyssey: Sport and Returning Home
65(5)
Epic Sport as Spectacle
70(2)
4 Archaic Greece: Athletics in an Age of Change
72(22)
Factors in the Growth of Athletics
76(9)
Nudity, Democracy, and Eros
85(5)
Funeral Games and City-State Prizes
90(2)
The Coming of Age of Greek Sport
92(2)
5 In Search of the Ancient Olympics
94(16)
The Olympics of Illusion and Allusion
95(4)
Modern Myths and Invented Traditions
99(2)
The Quagmire of Olympic Origins: Explanations and Excavations
101(9)
6 Ancient Olympia and its Games
110(26)
The Physical Context: Sanctuary and Facilities
111(3)
The Olympic Festival: Operation and Administration
114(5)
The Program of Contests
119(8)
Olympia and Spectacle: Politics, Problems, and Performances
127(9)
7 Panhellenic Sacred Crown Games
136(14)
Pythian Games
137(3)
Isthmian Games
140(3)
Nemean Games
143(5)
Panhellenic Variations and More
148(2)
8 Athens: City of Contests and Prizes
150(30)
The Panathenaic Games: Sacred and Civic Athletics
152(14)
Other Athletic Festivals
166(2)
Athletic Facilities
168(2)
Politics, Patronage, and Sport
170(4)
Athenian Athletes and Athletes at Athens
174(2)
Critics and Popular Attitudes
176(4)
9 Spartan Sport and Physical Education
180(18)
Physical Education: Building the Body Politic
181(4)
Spartan Athletics
185(3)
Kyniska and Spartan Chariot Racing at Olympia
188(8)
Not So Strange Greeks
196(2)
10 Greek Athletes: Myths, Motives, and Mobility 198(19)
Athletic Stars and Stories
199(4)
Pindar on Victory and Glory
203(2)
Athletes and Social History
205(6)
Democratization and Athletics
211(6)
11 Females and Greek Athletics 217(12)
Girls' Races and the Heraia
218(3)
Women at the Male Olympics?
221(4)
Virgin Olympic Spectators?
225(4)
12 Macedon and Hellenistic Sport and Spectacle 229(22)
Philip II: Proclaiming Greekness through Games
232(3)
Alexander the Great: Becoming Near Eastern through Spectacles
235(7)
Hellenistic Sport and Spectacle
242(7)
The Hellenistic Model
249(2)
13 The Roman Republic: Festivals, Celebrations, and Games 251(28)
Etruscan Sport and Spectacle: Greek Gifts and Roman Roots?
253(4)
Roman Festivals and Entertainments
257(1)
Chariot Racing at Rome
258(1)
Triumphs: Spectacles of Military Victory
259(5)
Hunts and Beasts: Conquests and Games
264(5)
Gladiators: Roman Rites and Combats
269(5)
Romans and Greek Sport
274(2)
Roman-Hellenistic Spectacular Discourse
276(3)
14 Late Republic and Augustus: Spectacles, Popular Politics, and Empire 279(21)
The Meaning of Gladiatorial Combat: Infamy and Virtue
280(5)
Sulla, Pompey, and Caesar: Magnificence and Munificence
285(4)
Augustus: Unification and Imperial Rule through Shows
289(11)
15 Spectacle, Sport, and the Roman Empire 300(40)
Emperors, Spectacles, and Scandals
303(1)
Days at the Track: Chariot Racing
304(6)
Imperial Triumphs
310(2)
Gladiators, Arenas, and Empire
312(11)
Beast Hunts: Nature and Empire
323(4)
Spectacular Executions: Beasts, Criminals, and Social Order
327(2)
Greek Games in the Roman Empire
329(9)
Assimilation and Accommodation
338(2)
Conclusion: Ancient Sport and Spectacle 340(7)
Notes 347(30)
Select Bibliography 377(12)
Index 389


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