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The St. Martin's Guide to Writing

by ;
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780312536121

ISBN10:
0312536127
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/26/2010
Publisher(s):
Bedford/St. Martin's

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Customer Reviews

Amazing book  March 19, 2011
by


I rented this text book for college. It is very clear and straight forward in content, and quite useful in writing essays. It also it teaches you how to write good reviews. The book gives examples of the skill they want to develop then guides you through writing exercises designed for that skill. It is easy to understand for college students and it is very helpful. I highly recommend it.






The St. Martin's Guide to Writing: 4 out of 5 stars based on 1 user reviews.

Summary

The best-selling college rhetoric for nearly 25 years, The St. Martinís Guide has achieved an unparalleled record of success by providing practical innovations for the ever-changing composition course. Comprehensive yet flexible, The Guideís acclaimed step by step guides to each type of writing offer sure fire invention strategies to get students started, combined with thorough advice on critical reading, working with sources, and careful revision.

Axelrod and Cooperís class tested guidance on visual rhetoric, online teaching and learning, and more is available for instructors who incorporate these topics into their courses but not intrusive, for those who donít.

The new edition has been re-engineered to reflect and build on the actual writing processes of students and does even more to prepare them for the writing they will do in other college courses.

Author Biography

RISE B. AXELROD is director of English composition and McSweeney Professor of Rhetoric and Teaching Excellence at the University of California, Riverside. She has previously been professor of English at California State University, San Bernardino, director of the College Expository Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and assistant director of the Third College Composition Program at the University of California, San Bernardino.


CHARLES R. COOPER is an emeritus professor in the department of literature at the University of California, San Diego, where he served as coordinator of the Third College Composition Program, Dimensions of Culture Program, and Campus Writing Programs. He has also been co-director of the San Diego Writing Project, one of the National Writing Project Centers. He is coeditor, with Lee Odell, of Evaluating Writing and Research on Composing: Points of Departure.


Together, they have coauthored Axelrod and Cooper’s Concise Guide to Writing and, with Allison Warriner, Reading Critically, Writing Well (Bedford/St. Martin’s).

Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors

Preface for Students

Chapter 1: Introduction: Thinking about Writing

Why Writing is Important

Writing Influences the Way You Think

Writing Helps You Learn

Writing Fosters Personal Development

Writing Connects You to Others

Writing Promotes Success in College and at Work

How Writing Is Learned

Learning to Write by Reading

Learning Writing Strategies

Using the Guides to Writing

Thinking Critically

 

PART ONE: WRITING ACTIVITIES

Chapter 2: Remembering an Event

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Rembering an Event

Reading Remembered Event Essays

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Jean Brandt, "Calling Home" (annotated student essay)

Annie Dillard, "An American Childhood"

*Trey Ellis, "When The Walls Came Tumbling Down"

*Saira Shah, "Longing to Belong"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Remembering an Event

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

Starting Points: Remembering an Event

Invention and Research

Choosing an Event to Write About

Ways In: Constructing a Well-Told Story

Creating a Dominant Impression

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Exploring Memorabilia

Ways In: Reflecting on the Event’s Autobiographical Significance

Defining Your Purpose and Audience

Considering Your Thesis

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Quoting, Paraphrasing, Summarizing Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Integrating Visuals

Editing and Proofreading

Using Commas after Introductory Elements

Using the Past Perfect

Correcting Fused Sentences

A Writer at Work

Jean Brandt’s Essay from Invention to Revision

Invention

The First Draft

Critical Reading and Revision

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Autobiography and Self- Discovery

Chapter 3: Writing Profiles

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Conducting an Interview

Reading Profiles

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Brian Cable, "The Last Stop" (annotated student essay)

John T. Edge, "I’m Not Leaving Until I Eat This Thing"

*Susan Orlean, "Show Dog"

Amanda Coyne, "The Long Good-Bye"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Writing Profiles

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

Starting Points: Writing a Profile

Invention and Research

Choosing a Subject to Profile

Ways In: Finalizing Your Choice

Exploring Your Preconceptions

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Setting Up a Tentative Schedule

Ways In: Collecting Information from Field Research

Ways In: Reflecting on Your Purpose and the Profile’s Perspective

Considering Your Thesis

Designing Your Document

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Integrating Quotations from Your Interviews Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Creating Web-Based Essays Editing and Proofreading

Checking the Punctuation of Quotations

A Common ESL Problem: Adjective Order

A Writer at Work

Brian Cable’s Interview Notes and Write-Up

The Interview Notes

The Interview Write-Up

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Entertaining Readers, or Showing the Whole Picture?

 

Chapter 4: Explaining a Concept

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Explaining a Concept

Reading Concept Explanations

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Linh Kieu Ngo, "Cannibalism: It Still Exists" (annotated student essay)

Anastasia Toufexis, "Love: The Right Chemistry"

Richard A. Friedman, "Born to Be Happy"

*Jeffrey Kluger, "What Makes Us Moral"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Explaining a Concept

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

STARTING POINTS: Explaining a Concept

Invention and Research

Choosing a Concept to Write About

Ways In: Gaining an Overview of a Concept

Ways In: Focusing the Concept

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Doing In-Depth Research on Your Focused Concept

Considering Explanatory Strategies

Designing Your Document

Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Using Descriptive Verbs to Introduce Information

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Designing Surveys and Presenting Results

Editing and Proofreading

Using Punctuation with Adjective Clauses

Using Commas with Interrupting Phrases

A Writer at Work

Linh Kieu Ngo’s Use of Sources

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Concept Explanations and the Nature of Knowledge

Chapter 5: Finding Common Ground

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Finding Common Ground

Reading Essays that Seek Common Ground

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

*Jeremy Bernard, "Lost Innocence" (annotated student essay)

*Melissa Mae, "Laying Claim to a Higher Morality" (student essay) Athena Alexander, "No Child Left Behind: ‘Historic Initiative’ or ‘Just an Empty Promise’?" (student essay)

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Finding Common Ground

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

STARTING POINTS: Finding Common Ground

Invention and Research

Choosing a Set of Argument Essays to Write About

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Analyzing the Essays

Thinking about Your Readers

Exploring Points of Agreement and Disagreement

Researching the Issue

Designing Your Document

Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Weaving Quoted Material into Your Own Sentences

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Helping Readers Visualize a Solution

Editing and Proofreading

Using Commas around Interrupting Phrases

Correcting Vague Pronoun Reference

A Writer at Work

Melissa Mae’s Analysis

Annotating and Charting Annotations

Mirko Bagaric and Julie Clarke, "A Case for Torture" Kermit D. Johnson, "Inhuman Behavior"

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Being Fair and Impartial

Appendix: Two Debates

Debate 1: Torture

*Ross Douthat, "Thinking about Torture"

*Glenn Greenwald, "Committing War Crimes for the ‘Right’ Reasons"

*Maryann Cusimano Love, "An End to Torture"

Debate 2: Same-Sex Marriage

*La Shawn Barber, "Interracial Marriage: A Slippery Slope?"

*Anna Quindlen, "The Loving Decision"

*National Review, "The Future of Marriage"

*Andrew Sullivan, "The Right’s Contempt for Gay Lives"

Chapter 6: Arguing a Position

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Arguing a Position

Reading Essays Arguing a Position

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Jessica Statsky, "Children Need to Play, Not Compete" (annotated student essay)

Richard Estrada, "Sticks and Stones and Sports Team Names"

Amitai Etzioni, "Eating at McDonald’s"

*Amy Goldwasser, "What’s the Matter with Kids Today?"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Arguing a Position

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

Starting Points: Arguing a Position

Invention and Research

Choosing an Issue to Write About

Ways In: Bringing the Issue and Your Audience into Focus

Framing the Issue for Your Readers

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Ways In: Developing Your Argument and Counterargument

Researching Your Argument

Designing Your Document

Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Fairly and Accurately Quoting Opposing Positions

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Adding Visuals

Editing and Proofreading

Using Commas before Coordinating Conjunctions

Using Punctuation with Conjunctive Adverbs

A Common ESL Problem: Subtle Differences in Meaning

A Writer at Work

Jessica Statsky’s Response to Opposing Positions

Listing Reasons for the Opposing Position

Accommodating a Plausible Reason

Refuting an Implausible Reason

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Suppressing Dissent

Chapter 7: Proposing a Solution

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Proposing a Solution to a Problem

Reading Essays Proposing a Solution

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Patrick O’Malley, "More Testing, More Learning" (annotated student essay)

Karen Kornbluh, "Win-Win Flexibility"

Matt Miller, "A New Deal for Teachers"

*Robert Kuttner, "Good Jobs for Americans Who Help Americans"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Proposing a Solution

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

STARTING POINTS: Proposing a Solution

Invention and Research

Choosing a Problem to Write About

Ways In: Bringing the Problem and Your Audience into Focus

Ways In: Finding a Solution

Ways In: Exploring Your Tentative Solution

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Ways In: Counterarguing Alternative Solutions

Researching Your Proposal

Designing Your Document

Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Establishing the Problem’s Existence and Seriousness

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Following Formatting Conventions Editing and Proofreading

Avoiding Ambiguous Use of This and That

Revising Sentences that Lack an Agent

A Writer at Work

Patrick O’Malley’s Revision Process

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: The Frustrations of Effecting Real Change

Chapter 8: Justifying an Evaluation

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Evaluating a Subject

Reading Essays That Justify an Evaluation

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Wendy Kim, "Grading Professors" (annotated student essay)

*Ann Hulbert, "Juno and the Culture Wars"

Christine Romano, "’Children Need to Play, Not Compete,’ by Jessica Statsky: An Evaluation" (student essay)

*Christine Rosen, "The Myth of Multitasking"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Justifying an Evaluation

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

STARTING POINTS: Justifying an Evaluation

Invention and Research

Choosing a Subject to Write About

Ways In: Bringing the Subject and Your Audience into Focus

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Ways In: Developing Your Argument and Counterargument

Researching Your Argument

Designing Your Document

Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Using Summary to Support Your Evaluative Argument

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Using Images to Support an Argument

Editing and Proofreading

Making Complete, Correct Comparisons

Combining Sentences

A Writer at Work

Christine Romano’s Counterargument of Objections

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Evaluators’ Hidden Assumptions

Chapter 9: Speculating about Causes

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Speculating about Causes

Reading Essays That Speculate about Causes

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Sheila McClain, "Fitness Culture: A Growing Trend in America" (annotated student essay)

Stephen King, "Why We Crave Horror Movies"

Erica Goode, "The Gorge-Yourself Environment"

*Jeremy Hsu, "The Secrets of Storytelling: Why We Love a Good Yarn"

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Speculating about Causes

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

STARTING POINTs: Speculating about Causes

Invention and Research

Considering Subjects and Their Possible Causes

Exploring What You Know and Need to Find Out about Your Subject

Analyzing Your Readers

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Ways In: Developing Your Argument

Designing Your Document

Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Citing a Variety of Sources to Support Your Causal Speculations

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Thinking about Document Design: Adding Graphs and Photos

Editing and Proofreading

Checking Your Use of Numbers

Checking for Reason Is Because Constructions

A Writer at Work

Sheila McClain’s Analysis of Causes

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Causal Speculation and the Power of Authority and Ideology

Chapter 10: Analyzing Stories

[chapter introduction]

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Analyzing a Story

Reading Essays That Analyze Stories

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Readings

Sally Crane, "Gazing into the Darkness" (annotated student essay)

David Ratinov, "From Innocence to Insight: ‘Araby’ as an Initiation Story" (student essay)

Beyond the Traditional Essay: Analyzing Stories

Guide to Writing

The Writing Assignment

Starting Points: Analyzing Stories

Invention and Research

Finding a Story to Write About

Analyzing the Story

Ways In: Developing Your Analysis

Testing Your Choice

A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice

Formulating a Tentative Thesis Statement

Researching Your Story

Designing Your Document

Planning And Drafting

Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals

Outlining Your Draft

Drafting

Working with Sources: Quoting from the Story to Support Your Analysis

Critical Reading Guide

Revising

Troubleshooting Your Draft

Editing and Proofreading

Using Parallel Structure

Using Ellipsis Marks Correctly

A Writer at Work

David Ratinov’s Invention Work

Annotating

Examining Patterns in the Story

Listing Ideas

Thinking Critically about What You Have Learned

Reflecting on Your Writing Process

Considering the Social Dimensions: Writing for a Specialized Audience

An Anthology of Short Stories

Kate Chopin, "The Story of an Hour"

James Joyce, "Araby"

William Carlos Williams, "The Use of Force"

*Sherman Alexie, "A Good Story"

PART II. CRITICAL THINKING STRATEGIES
Chapter 11: A Catalog of Invention Strategies

Mapping

Clustering

Listing

Outlining

Writing

Cubing

Dialoguing

Dramatizing

Keeping a Journal

Looping

Questioning

Quick Drafting


Chapter 12: A Catalog of Reading Strategies

Annotating

Martin Luther King Jr., An Annotated Sample from "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Taking Inventory

Outlining

Paraphrasing

Summarizing

Synthesizing

Contextualizing

Exploring the Significance of Figurative Language

Looking for Patterns of Opposition

Reflecting on Challenges to Your Beliefs and Values

Evaluating the Logic of an Argument

Testing for Appropriateness

Testing for Believability

Testing for Consistency and Completeness

Recognizing Emotional Manipulation

Judging the Writer’s Credibility

Testing for Knowledge

Testing for Common Ground

Testing for Fairness

PART III. WRITING STRATEGIES
Chapter 13: Cueing the Reader

Orienting Statements

Thesis Statements

Forecasting Statements

Paragraphing

Paragraph Cues

Topic Sentence Strategies

Cohesive Devices

Pronoun Reference

Word Repetition

Synonyms

Sentence Structure Repetition

Collocation

Transitions

Logical Relationships

Temporal Relationships

Spatial Relationships

Headings and Subheadings

Heading Systems and Levels

Headings and Genres

Frequency and Placement of Headings


Chapter 14: Narrating

Narrating Strategies

Calendar and Clock Time

Temporal Transitions

Verb Tense

Specific Narrative Action

Dialogue

Narrating a Process

Explanatory Process Narratives

Instructional Process Narratives


Chapter 15: Describing

Naming

Detailing

Comparing

Using Sensory Description

The Sense of Sight

The Sense of Hearing

The Sense of Smell

The Sense of Touch

The Sense of Taste

Creating a Dominant Impression


Chapter 16: Defining

Sentence Definitions

Extended Definitions

Historical Definitions

Stipulative Definitions


Chapter 17: Classifying

Organizing Classification

Illustrating Classification

Maintaining Clarity and Coherence


Chapter 18: Comparing and Contrasting

Two Ways of Comparing and Contrasting

Analogy


Chapter 19: Arguing

Asserting a Thesis

Arguable Assertions

Clear and Precise Wording

Appropriate Qualification

Giving Reasons and Support

Examples

Statistics

Authorities

Anecdotes

Textual Evidence

Counterarguing

Acknowledging Readers’ Concerns

Accommodating Readers’ Concerns

Refuting Readers’ Objections

Logical Fallacies


*Chapter 20: Analyzing Visuals

Criteria for Analyzing Visuals

A Sample Analysis

Chapter 21: Designing Documents

The Impact of Document Design

Considering Context, Audience, and Purpose

Elements of Document Design

Font Style and Size

Headings and Body Text

Numbered and Bulleted Lists

Colors

White Space

Adding Visuals

Choose Appropriate Visuals and Design the Visuals with Their Final Use in Mind

Number and Title Your Visuals

Label the Parts of Your Visuals and Include Descriptive Captions

Cite Your Visual Sources

Integrate the Visuals into the Text

Use Common Sense When Creating Visuals on a Computer

Sample Documents

Memos

Letters

E-mail

Résumés

Job-Application Letters

Lab Reports

Web Pages

PART IV. RESEARCH STRATEGIES
Chapter 22: Field Research
Observations

Planning the Visit

Observing and Taking Notes

Reflecting on Your Observations

Writing Up Your Notes

Preparing for Follow-Up Visits

Interviews

Planning and Setting Up the Interview

Taking Notes during the Interview

Reflecting on the Interview

Writing Up Your Notes

Questionnaires

Focusing Your Study

Writing Questions

Designing the Questionnaire

Testing the Questionnaire

Administering the Questionnaire

Writing Up the Results

Chapter 23: Library and Internet Research

Orienting Yourself to the Library

Taking a Tour

Consulting Librarians

Getting Started

Knowing Your Research Task

Finding Out What Your Library Offers

Consulting Encyclopedias

Consulting Bibliographies

Keeping Track of Your Research

Keeping a Working Bibliography

Taking Notes

Finding Library Sources

General Search Strategies

Finding Books: Using the Online Library Catalog

Finding Articles

Finding Government and Statistical Information

Finding Other Library Sources

Determining the Most Promising Sources

Using the Web for Research

Finding the Best Information Online

Using E-mail and Online Communities for Research

Evaluating Sources

Selecting Relevant Sources

Identifying Bias

Chapter 24: Using Sources

Acknowledging Sources

Avoiding Plagiarism

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing

Deciding Whether to Quote, Paraphrase, or Summarize

Quoting

Integrating Quotations

Introducing Quotations

Punctuating within Quotations

Avoiding Grammatical Tangles

Paraphrasing and Summarizing

Documenting Sources

The MLA System of Documentation

The APA System of Documentation

Some Sample Research Papers

An Annotated Research Paper

*Chapter 25: Annotated Bibliographies and Literature Reviews

Annotated Bibliographies and Literature Reviews: An Overview

Basic Features

Purpose and Audience

Annotated Bibliographies

Different Types of Annotation

Writing an Annotated Bibliography

Literature Reviews

PART V. WRITING FOR ASSESSMENT
Chapter 26: Essay Examinations

Preparing for an Exam

Reading the Exam Carefully

Some Typical Essay Exam Questions

Define or Identify

Explain the Importance or Signifiance

Apply Concepts

Comment on a Quotation

Compare and Contrast

Synthesize Information from Various Sources

Analyze Causes

Criticize or Evaluate

Planning Your Answer

Writing Your Answer

Model Answers to Some Typical Essay Exam Questions

Short Answers

Paragraph-Length Answers

Long Answers


Chapter 27: Writing Portfolios

The Purposes of a Writing Portfolio

Assembling a Portfolio for Your Composition Course

Selecting Work

Reflecting on Your Work and Your Learning

Organizing the Portfolio

PART VI. WRITING AND SPEAKING TO WIDER AUDIENCES
Chapter 28: Oral Presentations

Be Ready

Understand the Kind of Oral Presentation Your Have Been Asked to Give

Assess Your Audience and Purpose

Determine How Much Information Your Can Present in the Allotted Time

Use Cues to Orient Listeners

Prepare Effective and Appropriate Visuals

Verify That You Will Have the Correct Equipment and Supplies

Rehearse Your Presentation

Deliver the Oral Presentation Professionally

End Your Presentation Graciously


Chapter 29: Working with Others

Working with Others on Your Individual Writing Projects

Working with Others on Joint Writing Projects


Chapter 30: Writing in Your Community

Using Your Service Experience as Source Material

Finding a Topic

Gathering Sources

Writing about Your Service Experience

Writing for Your Service Organization

HANDBOOK

Introduction

Keeping a Record of Your Own Errors

S Sentence Boundaries

Comma Splices

Fused Sentences

Sentence Fragments
G Grammatical Sentences

Pronoun Reference

Pronoun Agreement

Relative Pronouns

Pronoun Case

Verbs

Subject-Verb Agreement

Adjectives and Adverbs
E Effective Sentences

Missing Words

Shifts

Noun Agreement

Modifiers

Mixed Constructions

Integrated Quotations, Questions, and Thoughts

Parallelism

Coordination and Subordination
W Word Choice

Concise Sentences

Exact Words

Appropriate Words
P Punctuation

Commas

Unnecessary Commas

Semicolons

Colons

Dashes

Quotation Marks

Apostrophes

Parentheses

Brackets

Ellipsis Marks

Slashes

Periods

Question Marks

Exclamation Points
M Mechanics

Hyphens

Capitalization

Spacing

Numbers

Underlining (Italics)

Abbreviations

Titles and Headings

Special Design Features

Spelling
L ESL Troublespots

Articles

Verbs

Prepositions

Omitted or Repeated Words

Adjective Order

Participles
R Review of Sentence Structure

Basic Sentence Structure

Basic Sentence Elements
GL Glossary of Frequently Misused Words Author and Title Index
Subject Index
Index for ESL Writers
 
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