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Statics and Strength of Materials,9780130490353
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Statics and Strength of Materials

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130490353

ISBN10:
0130490350
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $128.20
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Summary

This text covers the topics of statics and strength of materials at a level that is appropriate for industrial technology and engineering technology programs, as well as for university-level courses for non-engineering majors such as architecture. The book uses U.S. Customary and SI units equally in worked examples and practice problems. Sections requiring calculus are included for professors who teach in accredited programs in the technologies; these sections are marked with asterisks and may be omitted, depending on the level of coverage required, without a loss of continuity in the text. Chapters I through 8 cover the topic of statics and include a review of unit conversions, trigonometry, and simultaneous equations. Chapters 9 through 18 are devoted to the study of strength of materials. The new edition also includes: bull; bull;"Application sidebars" scattered throughout the text containing photos and line art that integrate theory with practice in selected areas of construction and manufacturing bull;A new section on residential design using tabulated values taken from the principal model building codes bull;More than 200 worked examples, and over 950 practice problems in varying degrees of difficulty bull;A new table of properties for MEL and MSR machine-graded lumber, with examples demonstrating their use

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 BASIC CONCEPTS 1(40)
1.1 Introduction,
1(1)
1.2 Fundamental Quantities: Units,
2(1)
1.3 SI Style and Usage,
3(1)
1.4 Conversion of Units,
4(1)
1.5 Numerical Computations,
5(3)
1.6 Trigonometric Functions,
8(9)
1.7 Trigonometric Formulas,
17(7)
1.8 Linear Equations and Determinants,
24(17)
Chapter 2 RESULTANT OF CONCURRENT FORCES IN A PLANE 41(25)
2.1 Introduction,
41(1)
2.2 Graphical Representation of Forces: Vectors,
42(1)
2.3 Resultant of Two Concurrent Forces: Vectors,
42(7)
2.4 Resultant of Three or More Concurrent Forces,
49(3)
2.5 Components of a Force Vector,
52(5)
2.6 Resultant of Concurrent Forces by Rectangular Components,
57(5)
2.7 Difference of Two Forces: Vector Differences,
62(4)
Chapter 3 EQUILIBRIUM OF CONCURRENT FORCES IN A PLANE 66(29)
3.1 Conditions for Equilibrium,
66(1)
3.2 Action and Reaction,
67(1)
3.3 Space Diagram, Free-Body Diagram,
68(1)
3.4 Construction of a Free-Body Diagram,
68(9)
3.5 Three Concurrent Forces in Equilibrium,
77(8)
3.6 Four or More Forces in Equilibrium,
85(1)
3.7 Equilibrium by Rectangular Component Method,
86(9)
Chapter 4 RESULTANT OF NONCONCURRENT FORCES IN A PLANE 95(28)
4.1 Introduction,
95(1)
4.2 Transmissibility,
96(1)
4.3 Moment of a Force,
96(3)
4.4 Theorem of Moments,
99(7)
4.5 Resultant of Parallel Forces,
106(3)
4.6 Resultant of Nonparallel Forces,
109(4)
4.7 Moment of a Couple,
113(2)
4.8 Resolution of a Force into a Force and Couple,
115(4)
4.9 Resultant of Distributed Loading,
119(4)
Chapter 5 EQUILIBRIUM OF A RIGID BODY 123(30)
5.1 Introduction,
123(1)
5.2 Support Conditions for Bodies in a Plane,
124(2)
5.3 Construction of Free-Body Diagrams,
126(3)
5.4 Equations for Equilibrium of a Rigid Body,
129(15)
5.5 Equilibrium of a Two-Force Body,
144(1)
5.6 Equilibrium of a Three-Force Body,
144(4)
5.7 Statical Determinacy and Constraint of a Rigid Body,
148(5)
Chapter 6 FORCE ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES AND MACHINES 153(47)
6.1 Introduction,
153(1)
6.2 Simple Plane Trusses,
154(5)
6.3 Members Under Special Loading,
159(1)
6.4 Method of Joints,
159(15)
6.5 Graphical Method of Joints,
174(1)
6.6 Method of Sections,
174(7)
6.7 Frames and Machines,
181(19)
Chapter 7 FORCES IN SPACE 200(32)
7.1 Introduction,
200(1)
7.2 Components of a Force in Space,
201(3)
7.3 Resultant of Concurrent Forces in Space,
204(4)
7.4 Equilibrium of a Concurrent Force System in Space,
208(8)
7.5 Moment of a Force About an Axis,
216(1)
7.6 Resultant of Parallel Forces in Space,
217(2)
7.7 Support Conditions for Bodies in Space,
219(2)
7.8 Equilibrium of a Rigid Body in Space,
221(11)
Chapter 8 FRICTION 232(29)
8.1 Introduction,
232(1)
8.2 Dry or Coulomb Friction,
233(3)
8.3 Angle of Friction,
236(7)
8.4 Wedges,
243(1)
8.5 Square-Threaded Screws: Screw Jacks,
244(5)
8.6 Axle Friction: Journal Bearings,
249(3)
8.7 Special Applications,
252(4)
8.8 Rolling Resistance,
256(5)
Chapter 9 CENTER OF GRAVITY, CENTROIDS, AND MOMENTS OF INERTIA OF AREAS 261(55)
9.1 Introduction,
261(1)
9.2 Center of Gravity,
262(1)
9.3 Centroid of a Plane Area,
263(3)
9.4 Centroids by Inspection,
266(1)
9.5 Centroids of Composite Areas,
267(5)
9.6 Centroids of Structural Cross Sections,
272(11)
9.7 Moment of Inertia of a Plane Area,
283(4)
9.8 Parallel-Axis Theorem,
287(1)
9.9 Moment of Inertia of Composite Areas,
288(16)
9.10 Polar Moment of Inertia,
304(1)
9.11 Radius of Gyration,
305(1)
9.12 Determination of Centroids by Integration,
306(5)
9.13 Determination of Moments of Inertia by Integration,
311(5)
Chapter 10 INTERNAL REACTIONS; STRESS FOR AXIAL LOADS 316(45)
10.1 Introduction,
316(4)
10.2 Internal Reactions,
320(6)
10.3 Stress,
326(2)
10.4 Stress in an Axially Loaded Member,
328(5)
10.5 Average Shear Stress,
333(1)
10.6 Bearing Stress,
334(6)
10.7 Problems Involving Normal, Shear, and Bearing Stress,
340(8)
10.8 Allowable Stress, Factor of Safety,
348(7)
10.9 Further Analysis of Axial Loads: Stresses on Oblique Sections,
355(6)
Chapter 11 STRAIN FOR AXIAL LOADS: HOOKE'S LAW 361(38)
11.1 Axial Strain,
362(1)
11.2 Tension Test and Stress-Strain Diagram,
363(4)
11.3 Hooke's Law,
367(4)
11.4 Axially Loaded Members,
371(5)
11.5 Statically Indeterminate Axially Loaded Members,
376(6)
11.6 Poisson's Ratio,
382(1)
11.7 Thermal Deformation; Thermally Induced Stress
383(5)
11.8 Additional Mechanical Properties of Materials,
388(3)
11.9 Strain and Stress Distributions; Saint-Venant's Principle,
391(1)
11.10 Stress Concentrations,
392(4)
11.11 Repeated Loading, Fatigue,
396(3)
Chapter 12 SHEAR STRESSES AND STRAINS; TORSION 399(30)
12.1 Introduction,
399(1)
12.2 Shearing Stress on Planes at Right Angles,
400(1)
12.3 Shearing Strains,
400(1)
12.4 Hooke's Law for Shear,
401(1)
12.5 Torsion of a Circular Shaft,
402(4)
12.6 Further Comments on the Torsion of a Circular Shaft,
406(2)
12.7 Problems Involving Deformation and Stress in a Circular Shaft,
408(5)
12.8 Torsion Test,
413(1)
12.9 Power Transmission,
414(7)
12.10 Flange Couplings,
421(8)
Chapter 13 SHEAR FORCES AND BENDING MOMENTS IN BEAMS 429(34)
13.1 Introduction,
429(1)
13.2 Types of Beams,
430(1)
13.3 Beam Reactions,
431(2)
13.4 Shear Forces and Bending Moments in Beams,
433(10)
13.5 Shear-Force and Bending-Moment Diagrams,
443(4)
13.6 Relations Among Loads, Shear Forces, and Bending Moments,
447(16)
Chapter 14 BENDING AND SHEARING STRESSES IN BEAMS 463(80)
14.1 Introduction,
463(1)
14.2 Pure Bending of a Symmetrical Beam,
464(2)
14.3 Deformation Geometry for a Symmetrical Beam in Pure Bending,
466(1)
14.4 Hooke's Law: Distribution of Bending Stress,
467(1)
14.5 Bending Stress Formula: Flexure Formula,
468(2)
14.6 Elastic Section Modulus,
470(1)
14.7 Problems Involving the Bending Stress Formula,
470(12)
14.8 Shearing Stress in Beams,
482(2)
14.9 Horizontal Shearing Stress Formula,
484(13)
14.10 Shear Flow Formula,
497(5)
14.11 Design of Beams for Strength,
502(16)
14.12 Residential Design Using Tabulated Values,
518(25)
Chapter 15 DEFLECTION OF BEAMS DUE TO BENDING 543(75)
15.1 Introduction,
543(1)
15.2 Bending-Moment Diagram by Parts,
544(9)
15.3 Moment-Area Method,
553(5)
15.4 Deflection of a Cantilever Beam by the Moment-Area Method,
558(7)
15.5 Deflection of the Simply Supported Beam by the Moment-Area Method,
565(8)
15.6 Superposition Method,
573(9)
15.7 Beam Deflections Using Computer Software,
582(8)
15.8 Statically Indeterminate Beams by the Superposition Method,
590(7)
15.9 Deflection of Beams by Integration,
597(9)
15.10 Singularity Functions,
606(12)
Chapter 16 COMBINED STRESSES AND MOHR'S CIRCLE 618(45)
16.1 Introduction,
618(1)
16.2 Axial Forces and Bending Moments,
619(12)
16.3 Unsymmetrical Bending,
631(4)
16.4 Eccentrically Loaded Members,
635(3)
16.5 Plane Stress,
638(1)
16.6 Stress Components on an Oblique Plane,
638(2)
16.7 Mohr's Circle for Plane Stress,
640(4)
16.8 Principal Stresses,
644(2)
16.9 Maximum Shear Stress,
646(2)
16.10 Axial Stress,
648(2)
16.11 Biaxial Stress: Thin-Walled Pressure Vessel,
650(5)
16.12 Pure Shear,
655(1)
16.13 Combined Stress Problems,
656(7)
Chapter 17 COLUMNS 663(20)
17.1 Introduction,
663(2)
17.2 Euler Column Formula,
665(2)
17.3 Effective Length of Columns,
667(1)
17.4 Further Comments on the Euler Column Formula,
668(4)
17.5 Tangent Modulus Theory,
672(1)
17.6 Empirical Column Formulas: Design Formulas,
673(10)
Chapter 18 BOLTED, RIVETED, AND WELDED STRUCTURAL CONNECTIONS 683(22)
18.1 Introduction,
683(1)
18.2 Rivets and Bolts,
684(1)
18.3 Methods of Failure for Bolted Joints,
684(3)
18.4 Axially Loaded Bolted and Riveted Connections,
687(6)
18.5 Shear Connections for Building Frames,
693(4)
18.6 Welds,
697(3)
18.7 Axially Loaded Welds,
700(5)
Appendix 705(34)
Answers to Even-Numbered Problems 739(10)
Index 749

Excerpts

The objective of this fifth edition is to cover statics and strength of materials at an elementary level, where calculus is not required. However, for instructors who use the text to teach in accredited programs in the technologies, sections requiring calculus are included. Those sections relate to centroids and moments of inertia of plane areas, and deflection of beams by integration. Marked with an asterisk, this material can be omitted without a loss of continuity. Statics and Strength of Materialsis written for students enrolled in the industrial technology or engineering technology curriculum, and in university-level courses for nonengineering majors, such as architecture. It is also useful for self-study and can serve as a reference for courses in materials, materials testing, machine design, and structural design. This edition contains several new features, including a number of Application Sidebars scattered throughout the book. These pages describe real-life applications related to topics discussed in the text and serve to emphasize the fact that statics and strength of materials are not purely academic subjects. We have also included a new section on residential design utilizing tabulated values. Many students are aware of the fact that residential construction practices are influenced primarily by local or federal building codes. However, those same students are often unaware of any limitations within the code tables and cannot always make a connection between such tabulated values and the theoretical values obtained using traditional methods. We hope that the new material will help bridge this gap. Also, due to the increasing use of machine-graded lumber, a table of machine-stress rated (MSR) and machine-evaluated lumber (MEL) designations and properties has been added to the Appendix. Aside from this additional material, the general plan of the book is unchanged. Care has been taken to present the various topics with clarity in a simple and direct fashion and to avoid information overload. To that end, more than 200 examples illustrate the principles involved. Chapters 1 through 9 provide coverage of statics, while strength of materials is covered in Chapters 10 through 18. The chapters on statics begin with a review of basic mathematics. Trigonometric formulas and the component method are employed to solve concurrent force problems. A discussion of the resultant and equilibrium bf nonconcurrent forces follows, with special emphasis on the theorem of moments. Then the force analysis of structures and machines, and concurrent and nonconcurrent force systems in space is presented. The chapters on statics conclude with friction, centers of gravity, centroids, and moment of inertia of areas. The chapters on strength of materials begin with the study of stress and strain in axially loaded members. This is followed by discussions of shear stresses and strains in torsion members, bending and deflection of beams, combined stress using Mohr's circle, columns, and structural connections. The text includes more than 950 problems at various levels of difficulty for the student. Both the U.S. customary system of units and the international system of units (SI) are introduced and applied equally in the problems and examples. The majority of the material in this book was originally written by H. W. Morrow, who prepared two preliminary editions for use at Nassau (NY) Community College from 1976 to 1979. These were followed by three editions, published in 1981, 1993 and 1998, by Prentice Hall. Subsequent editions represent a joint collaboration between Mr. Morrow and R. P Kokemak of Fitchburg (MA) State College. We would like to thank the following individuals for the help they provided with various aspects of the fifth edition: Neil Gow of Morgan Contraction Company; David Tourigny of Marceau's Industrial Belt Services; and Christine Woollett of The Royal Society. Special thanks


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