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Steel Designers' Manual,9781405189408
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Steel Designers' Manual

by Unknown
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9781405189408

ISBN10:
1405189401
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
2/20/2012
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell
List Price: $186.66

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Summary

This classic manual on structural steelwork design was first published in 1955, since when it has sold many tens of thousands of copies worldwide. For the seventh edition all chapters have been comprehensively reviewed, revised to ensure they reflect current approaches and best practice, and brought in to compliance with EN 1993: Design of Steel Structures. The Steel Designers' Manual continues to provide, in one volume, the essential knowledge for the design of conventional steelwork.

Author Biography

The Steel Construction Institute (SCI) is the leading, independent provider of technical expertise and disseminator of best practice to the steel construction sector.

Buick Davidson is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Civil and Structural Engineering at the University of Sheffield.

Graham Owens was, until recently, Director of the SCI and he is now a consultant for the SCI.

Table of Contents

Introduction to the seventh edition xv

Contributors xix

INTRODUCTION

1 Introduction – designing to the Eurocodes 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Creation of the Eurocodes 2

1.3 Structure of the Eurocodes 2

1.4 Non-contradictory complementary information – NCCI 5

1.5 Implementation in the UK 5

1.6 Benefits of designing to the Eurocodes 6

1.7 Industry support for the introduction of the Eurocodes 7

1.8 Conclusions 8

2 Integrated design for successful steel construction 10

2.1 Client requirements for whole building performance, value

and impact 10

2.2 Design for sustainability 19

2.3 Design for overall economy 27

2.4 Conclusions 33

References to Chapter 2 34

3 Loading to the Eurocodes 35

3.1 Imposed loads 35

3.2 Imposed loads on roofs 38

3.3 Snow loads 39

3.4 Accidental actions 52

3.5 Combinations of actions 54

References to Chapter 3 60

Worked example 61

DESIGN SYNTHESIS

4 Single-storey buildings 65

4.1 The roles for steel in single-storey buildings 65

4.2 Design for long term performance 66

4.3 Anatomy of structure 70

4.4 Loading 78

4.5 Common types of primary frame 80

4.6 Preliminary design of portal frames 90

4.7 Bracing 101

4.8 Design of portal frames to BS EN 1993-1-1 109

References to Chapter 4 127

Worked example 128

5 Multi-storey buildings 134

5.1 Introduction 134

5.2 Costs and construction programme 135

5.3 Understanding the design brief 137

5.4 Structural arrangements to resist sway 140

5.5 Stabilising systems 150

5.6 Columns 154

5.7 Floor systems 157

References to Chapter 5 169

6 Industrial steelwork 171

6.1 Introduction 171

6.2 Anatomy of structure 181

6.3 Loading 195

6.4 Thermal effects 201

6.5 Crane girder/lifting beam design 202

6.6 Structure in its wider context 204

References to Chapter 6 205

Further reading for Chapter 6 205

7 Special steel structures 207

7.1 Introduction 207

7.2 Space frame structures: 3-dimensional grids based on

regular solids 208

7.3 Lightweight tension steel cable structures 210

7.4 Lightweight compression steel structures 219

7.5 Steel for stadiums 226

7.6 Information and process in the current

digital age – the development of technology 228

References to Chapter 7 235

Further reading for Chapter 7 236

8 Light steel structures and modular construction 238

8.1 Introduction 238

8.2 Building applications 242

8.3 Benefits of light steel construction 245

8.4 Light steel building elements 248

8.5 Modular construction 252

8.6 Hybrid construction 257

8.7 Structural design issues 260

8.8 Non-structural design issues 264

References to Chapter 8 270

9 Secondary steelwork 271

9.1 Introduction 271

9.2 Issues for consideration 271

9.3 Applications 280

References to Chapter 9 303

APPLIED METALLURGY

10 Applied metallurgy of steel 305

10.1 Introduction 305

10.2 Chemical composition 306

10.3 Heat treatment 309

10.4 Manufacture and effect on properties 315

10.5 Engineering properties and mechanical tests 319

10.6 Fabrication effects and service performance 321

10.7 Summary 327

References to Chapter 10 329

Further reading for Chapter 10 330

11 Failure processes 331

11.1 Fracture 331

11.2 Linear elastic fracture mechanics 335

11.3 Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics 337

11.4 Materials testing for fracture properties 340

11.5 Fracture-safe design 343

11.6 Fatigue 345

11.7 Final comments 356

References to Chapter 11 357

Further reading for Chapter 11 358

ANALYSIS

12 Analysis 359

12.1 Introduction 359

12.2 The basics 360

12.3 Analysis and design 364

12.4 Analysis by hand 368

12.5 Analysis by software 371

12.6 Analysis of multi-storey buildings 381

12.7 Portal frame buildings 391

12.8 Special structural members 404

12.9 Very important issues 425

References to Chapter 12 427

13 Structural vibration 430

13.1 Introduction 430

13.2 Causes of vibration 432

13.3 Perception of vibration 433

13.4 Types of response 436

13.5 Determining the modal properties 437

13.6 Calculating vibration response 443

13.7 Acceptability criteria 449

13.8 Practical considerations 450

13.9 Synchronised crowd activities 452

References to Chapter 13 452

ELEMENT DESIGN

14 Local buckling and cross-section classification 454

14.1 Introduction 454

14.2 Cross-sectional dimensions and moment-rotation behaviour 457

14.3 Effect of moment-rotation behaviour on approach to design

and analysis 461

14.4 Classification table 462

14.5 Economic factors 462

References to Chapter 14 463

15 Tension members 464

15.1 Introduction 464

15.2 Types of tension member 464

15.3 Design for axial tension 465

15.4 Combined bending and tension 468

15.5 Eccentricity of end connections 471

15.6 Other considerations 472

15.7 Cables 473

Further reading for Chapter 15 476

16 Columns and struts 477

16.1 Introduction 477

16.2 Common types of member 477

16.3 Design considerations 478

16.4 Cross-sectional considerations 480

16.5 Column buckling resistance 484

16.6 Torsional and flexural-torsional buckling 486

16.7 Effective (buckling) lengths Lcr 487

16.8 Special types of strut 493

16.9 Economic points 496

References to Chapter 16 497

Further reading for Chapter 16 497

Worked example 498

17 Beams 503

17.1 Introduction 503

17.2 Common types of beam 503

17.3 Cross-section classification and moment resistance Mc,Rd 506

17.4 Basic design 507

17.5 Laterally unrestrained beams 513

17.6 Beams with web openings 520

References to Chapter 17 521

Worked example 522

18 Plate girders 533

18.1 Introduction 533

18.2 Advantages and disadvantages 533

18.3 Initial choice of cross-section for plate girders 534

18.4 Design of plate girders to BS EN 1993-1-5 536

References to Chapter 18 552

Worked example 553

19 Members with compression and moments 563

19.1 Occurrence of combined loading 563

19.2 Types of response – interaction 564

19.3 Effect of moment gradient loading 570

19.4 Selection of type of cross-section 574

19.5 Basic design procedure to Eurocode 3 575

19.6 Special design methods for members in portal frames 577

References to Chapter 19 584

Further reading for Chapter 19 585

Worked example 586

20 Trusses 600

20.1 Introduction 600

20.2 Types of truss 600

20.3 Guidance on overall concept 602

20.4 Selection of elements and connections 603

20.5 Analysis of trusses 604

20.6 Detailed design considerations for elements 607

20.7 Bracing 609

20.8 Rigid-jointed Vierendeel girders 610

References to Chapter 20 612

Worked example 613

21 Composite slabs 623

21.1 Definition 623

21.2 General description 623

21.3 Design for the construction condition 626

21.4 Design of composite slabs 628

21.5 Design for shear and concentrated loads 633

21.6 Tests on composite slabs 635

21.7 Serviceability limits and crack control 636

21.8 Shrinkage and creep 638

21.9 Fire resistance 639

References for Chapter 21 640

Worked example 641

22 Composite beams 647

22.1 Introduction 647

22.2 Material properties 649

22.3 Composite beams 651

22.4 Plastic analysis of composite section 654

22.5 Shear resistance 658

22.6 Shear connection 659

22.7 Full and partial shear connection 664

22.8 Transverse reinforcement 669

22.9 Primary beams and edge beams 672

22.10 Continuous composite beams 673

22.11 Serviceability limit states 675

22.12 Design tables for composite beams 680

References to Chapter 22 682

Worked example 684

23 Composite columns 701

23.1 Introduction 701

23.2 Design of composite columns 702

23.3 Simplified design method 704

23.4 Illustrative examples of design of composite columns 718

23.5 Longitudinal and transverse shear forces 720

References to Chapter 23 722

Worked example 723

24 Design of light gauge steel elements 733

24.1 Introduction 733

24.2 Section properties 736

24.3 Local buckling 741

24.4 Distortional buckling 744

24.5 Design of compression members 748

24.6 Design of members in bending 751

References to Chapter 24 756

Worked example 757

25 Bolting assemblies 769

25.1 Types of structural bolting assembly 769

25.2 Methods of tightening and their application 771

25.3 Geometric considerations 772

25.4 Methods of analysis of bolt groups 774

25.5 Design strengths 778

25.6 Tables of resistance 783

References to Chapter 25 783

Further reading for Chapter 25 784

26 Welds and design for welding 785

26.1 Advantages of welding 785

26.2 Ensuring weld quality and properties by the use of standards 786

26.3 Recommendations for cost reduction 792

26.4 Welding processes 797

26.5 Geometric considerations 803

26.6 Methods of analysis of weld groups 804

26.7 Design strengths 807

26.8 Concluding remarks 809

References to Chapter 26 810

27 Joint design and simple connections 812

27.1 Introduction 812

27.2 Simple connections 820

References to Chapter 27 842

Worked example 844

28 Design of moment connections 868

28.1 Introduction 868

28.2 Design philosophy 869

28.3 Tension zone 870

28.4 Compression zone 876

28.5 Shear zone 878

28.6 Stiffeners 879

28.7 Design moment of resistance of end-plate joints 879

28.8 Rotational stiffness and rotation capacity 882

28.9 Summary 883

References to Chapter 28 883

FOUNDATIONS

29 Foundations and holding-down systems 885

29.1 Types of foundation 885

29.2 Design of foundations 887

29.3 Fixed and pinned column bases 891

29.4 Pinned column bases – axially loaded I-section columns 891

29.5 Design of fixed column bases 902

29.6 Holding-down systems 906

References to Chapter 29 908

Further reading for Chapter 29 909

Worked example 910

30 Steel piles and steel basements 916

30.1 Introduction 916

30.2 Types of steel piles 916

30.3 Geotechnical uncertainty 920

30.4 Choosing a steel basement 923

30.5 Detailed basement design: Introduction 929

30.6 Detailed basement designs: Selection of soil parameters 934

30.7 Detailed basement design: Geotechnical analysis 937

30.8 Detailed basement design: Structural design 943

30.9 Other design details 949

30.10 Constructing a steel basement: Pile installation techniques 950

30.11 Specification and site control 953

30.12 Movement and monitoring 955

References to Chapter 30 956

Further reading for Chapter 30 957

CONSTRUCTION

31 Design for movement in structures 959

31.1 Introduction 959

31.2 Effects of temperature variation 961

31.3 Spacing of expansion joints 962

31.4 Design for movement in typical single-storey industrial

steel buildings 962

31.5 Design for movement in typical multi-storey buildings 964

31.6 Treatment of movement joints 965

31.7 Use of special bearings 967

References to Chapter 31 969

32 Tolerances 970

32.1 Introduction 970

32.2 Standards 972

32.3 Implications of tolerances 974

32.4 Fabrication tolerances 976

32.5 Erection tolerances 982

References to Chapter 32 1000

Further reading for Chapter 32 1000

33 Fabrication 1002

33.1 Introduction 1002

33.2 Economy of fabrication 1002

33.3 Welding 1009

33.4 Bolting 1009

33.5 Cutting 1012

33.6 Handling and routeing of steel 1016

33.7 Quality management 1020

References to Chapter 33 1023

Further reading for Chapter 33 1023

34 Erection 1024

34.1 Introduction 1024

34.2 Method statements, regulations and documentation 1025

34.3 Planning 1026

34.4 Site practices 1029

34.5 Site fabrication and modifications 1035

34.6 Steel decking and shear connectors 1037

34.7 Cranes and craneage 1038

34.8 Safety 1048

34.9 Accidents 1055

References to Chapter 34 1056

Further reading for Chapter 34 1056

35 Fire protection and fire engineering 1057

35.1 Introduction 1057

35.2 Building regulations 1057

35.3 Fire engineering design codes 1058

35.4 Structural performance in fire 1062

35.5 Fire protection materials 1072

35.6 Advanced fire engineering 1073

35.7 Selection of an appropriate approach to fire protection and fire

engineering for specific buildings 1078

References to Chapter 35 1078

Worked example 1081

36 Corrosion and corrosion prevention 1088

36.1 Introduction 1088

36.2 General corrosion 1089

36.3 Other forms of corrosion 1090

36.4 Corrosion rates 1091

36.5 Effect of the environment 1091

36.6 Design and corrosion 1092

36.7 Surface preparation 1093

36.8 Metallic coatings 1095

36.9 Paint coatings 1097

36.10 Application of paints 1101

36.11 Weather-resistant steels 1102

36.12 The protective treatment specification 1104

Relevant standards 1107

Appendix 1110

Steel technology

Elastic properties 1111

European standards for structural steels 1112

Design theory

Bending moment, shear and deflection 1115

Second moments of area 1143

Geometric properties of plane sections 1151

Plastic moduli 1154

Formulae for rigid frames 1157

Design of elements and connections

Explanatory notes on section dimensions and properties 1175

Tables of dimensions and gross section properties 1193

Bolt and Weld Data for S275 1259

Bolt and Weld Data for S355 1274

Eurocodes

Extracts from Concise Eurocodes 1289

Floors

Floor plates 1309

Construction

Fire resistance 1312

Section factors for fire design 1332

Corrosion resistance 1337

Standards

British and European Standards for steelwork 1340

Index 1351



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