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Steps to Writing Well (7th),9780155054530

Steps to Writing Well (7th)

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780155054530

ISBN10:
0155054538
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/23/1998
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $52.67

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 7/23/1998.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Summary

Writing well is just a step away! Join the thousands of students who have learned to write well with Jean Wyrick's helpful instruction. STEPS TO WRITING WELL, Tenth Edition, is the ultimate step-by-step guide to writing effective essays. With Wyrick's clear, practical advice and student-friendly tone, you'll find it easy to begin, organize, and revise your writing-from choosing a topic to developing your essay to polishing your prose. Interesting readings in a variety of styles offer useful examples of the types of essays you'll most often be assigned in your composition and other college classes.

Table of Contents

To the Teacher vii
To the Student xiii
PART ONE THE BASICS OF THE SHORT ESSAY 1(190)
Prewriting
3(30)
Getting Started (or Soup-Can Labels Can Be Fascinating)
3(1)
Selecting a Subject
4(2)
Finding Your Essay's Purpose and Focus
6(1)
Pump-Primer Techniques
7(12)
After You've Found Your Focus
19(1)
Practicing What You've Learned
19(1)
Discovering Your Audience
20(1)
How to Identify Your Readers
21(6)
Practicing What You've Learned
25(2)
Keeping a Journal (Talking to Yourself Does Help)
27(6)
Summary
31(2)
The Thesis Statement
33(18)
What Is a Thesis? What Does a ``Working Thesis'' Do?
34(1)
Can a ``Working Thesis'' Change?
34(1)
Guidelines for Writing a Good Thesis
35(5)
Avoiding Common Errors in Thesis Statements
40(4)
Practicing What You've Learned
42(2)
Assignment
44(1)
Using the Essay Map
44(7)
Practicing What You've Learned
46(1)
Assignment
47(2)
Summary
49(2)
The Body Paragraphs
51(38)
Planning the Body of Your Essay
51(3)
Composing the Body Paragraphs
54(1)
The Topic Sentence
55(9)
Practicing What You've Learned
61(3)
Assignment
64(1)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
64(1)
Paragraph Development
64(5)
Paragraph Length
69(2)
Practicing What You've Learned
70(1)
Assignment
71(1)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
71(1)
Paragraph Unity
71(5)
Practicing What You've Learned
74(2)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
76(1)
Paragraph Coherence
76(10)
Practicing What You've Learned
82(4)
Paragraph Sequence
86(1)
Transitions between Paragraphs
86(3)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
87(1)
Summary
88(1)
Beginnings and Endings
89(12)
How to Write a Good Lead-In
89(4)
Avoiding Errors in Lead-Ins
93(1)
Practicing What You've Learned
94(1)
How to Write a Good Concluding Paragraph
94(2)
Avoiding Errors in Conclusions
96(1)
Practicing What You've Learned
97(1)
How to Write a Good Title
97(4)
Assignment
98(1)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
98(1)
Summary
99(2)
Drafting and Revising: Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking
101(26)
What Is Revision?
102(1)
When Does Revision Occur?
102(1)
Myths about Revision
102(2)
Can I Learn to Improve My Revision Skills?
104(1)
Preparing to Draft and Revise
104(2)
A Revision Process for Your Drafts
106(3)
What Is Critical Thinking?
109(1)
Thinking Critically as a Writer
109(7)
A Final Checklist for Your Essay
116(1)
Benefiting from Revision Workshops
117(6)
Practicing What You've Learned
120(3)
Assignment
123(1)
Some Last Advice: How to Play with Your Mental Blocks
123(4)
Summary
126(1)
Effective Sentences
127(30)
Developing a Clear Style
128(7)
Developing a Concise Style
135(7)
Practicing What You've Learned
140(2)
Assignment
142(1)
Developing a Lively Style
142(6)
Practicing What You've Learned
146(2)
Assignment
148(1)
Developing an Emphatic Style
148(9)
Practicing What You've Learned
152(2)
Assignment
154(1)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
155(1)
Summary
156(1)
Word Logic
157(24)
Selecting the Correct Words
158(8)
Practicing What You've Learned
164(2)
Selecting the Best Words
166(15)
Practicing What You've Learned
176(2)
Assignment
178(2)
Applying What You've Learned to Your Writing
180(1)
Summary
180(1)
The Reading-Writing Connection
181(10)
How Can Reading Well Help Me Become a Better Writer?
181(1)
How Can I Become an Analytical Reader?
182(8)
Sample Annotated Essay
185(4)
Practicing What You've Learned
189(1)
Assignment
189(1)
Summary
189(1)
The Basics of the Short Essay: Part One Summary
190(1)
PART TWO PURPOSES, MODES, AND STRATEGIES 191(172)
Exposition
193(90)
The Strategies of Exposition
193(1)
Development by Example
194(14)
Essay Topics
200(2)
Sample Student Essay
202(2)
Professional Essay: ``So What's so Bad about Being So-So?''
204(3)
The drive for perfection is preventing too many people from enjoying sports and hobbies, says author Lisa Wilson Strick (who proudly plays the piano badly but with great pleasure)
A Revision Worksheet
207(1)
Development by process Analysis
208(18)
Essay Topics
212(2)
Sample Student Essay
214(5)
Professional Essay: ``To Bid the World Farewell''
219(6)
By describing the embalming process in vivid, step-by-step detail, social critic and author Jessica Mitford questions the value-and necessity-of the entire procedure
A revision Worksheet
225(1)
Development by Comparison and Contrast
226(18)
Essay Topics
230(2)
Sample Student Essay
232(4)
Professional Essays: ``Two Ways of Viewing the River''
236(2)
One of the United States' most beloved writers, Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), contrasts his earlier, romantic view of the Mississippi River to his later, more practical view as an experienced riverboat pilot
``Grant and Lee: A Study in Contrasts''
238(5)
Noted historian Bruce Catton compares and contrasts the two great generals of the Civil War, concluding that their roles at Appomattox made possible ``a peace of reconciliation.''
A Revision Worksheet
243(1)
Development by Definition
244(14)
Essay Topics
248(2)
Sample Student Essay
250(4)
Professional Essay: ``The Munchausen Mystery''
254(3)
A Harvard professor of psychiatry explains a perplexing ``medical madness'' in which patients use extreme and sophisticated measures to take illnesses-in some cases, all the way to the operating room
A Revision Worksheet
257(1)
Development by Division and Classification
258(12)
Essay Topics
261(2)
Sample Student Essay
263(3)
Professional Essay: ``The Plot Against People''
266(3)
According to well-known columnist Russell Baker, all inanimate objects may be classified into three categories: those that don't work, those that get lost, and those that break down
A Revision Worksheet
269(1)
Development by Causal Analysis
270(13)
Essay Topics
273(2)
Sample Student Essay
275(3)
Professional Essay: ``Mystery!''
278(3)
Nothing that millions of readers love to ``curl up'' with murderers and corpses every night, novelist Nicholas Meyer explains why mysteries appeal to so many people, regardless of their social, educational, or economic background
A Revision Worksheet
281(2)
Argumentation
283(32)
Developing Your Essay
284(10)
Common Logical Fallacies
294(21)
Practicing What You've Learned
297(1)
Assignment
298(1)
Essay Topics
299(2)
Sample Student Essay
301(4)
Professional Essays: ``Free Pass Fails Kids'' vs. ``Retaining Kids No Answer''
305(3)
Students who fail to demonstrate academic competence should not be passed on to the next grade level, argues the editorial board of USA today. But Monty Neill of the National Center for Fair and Open Testing maintains that retaining students does not improve learning and too often turns teaching into ``test coaching.''
Pro-and-Con Advertisements: Gun Control
308(3)
Competing Advertisements: Energy
311(1)
A Revision Worksheet
311(4)
Description
315(18)
How to Write Effective Description
315(18)
Essay Topics
321(1)
Sample Student Essay
322(5)
Professional Essay: ``The Discuss Thrower''
327(3)
Surgeon Richard Selzer describes the last hours of a terminally ill patient-a man who is vigorously following the poet Dylan Thomas's advice: ``Do not go gentle into that good night.''
A Revision Worksheet
330(3)
Narration
333(16)
Writing the Effective Narrative Essay
334(15)
Essay Topics
336(3)
Sample Student Essay
339(3)
Professional Essay: ``Sister Flowers''
342(5)
Multi-talented writer and performer Maya Angelou recalls a special time in her life and shows how one person's kindness and respect can dramatically change a child's life for the better
A Revision Worksheet
347(2)
Writing Essays Using Multiple Strategies
349(14)
Sample Student Essay
352(4)
Professional Essay: ``Don't Let Stereotypes Warp Your Judgments''
356(4)
Are Gloria and Richard better looking than Bertha or Cuthbert? Do you vote for the candidate who looks like a winner? Can you really identify the Italian (or Swede or Mexican or American) in the group picture? In this essay, Professor Robert L. Heilbroner addresses the complex issues of stereotyping, first by citing some fascinating experiments that illustrate the problem. He then analyzes the causes of type-casting, explains the harmful effects, and offers some steps for changing this negative behavior
A Revision Worksheet
360(3)
PART THREE SPECIAL ASSIGNMENTS 363(78)
Writing a Paper Using Research
365(42)
Focusing Your Topic
366(1)
Beginning Your Library Research
366(4)
Preparing a Working Bibliography
370(2)
Choosing and Evaluating Your Sources
372(3)
Preparing an Annotated Bibliography
375(1)
Taking Notes
375(3)
Incorporating Your Source Material
378(3)
Avoiding Plagiarism
381(4)
Practicing What You've Learned
383(2)
Assignment
385(1)
Choosing the Documentation Style for Your Essay
385(13)
Using Supplementary Notes
398(9)
Sample Student Paper Using MLA Style
398(9)
Writing about Literature
407(24)
Using Literature in the Composition Classroom
407(2)
Suggestions for Close Reading of Literature
409(1)
Steps to Reading Stories
409(2)
Annotated Story: ``The Story of an Hour''
411(7)
Sample Student Essay
414(4)
Steps to Reading a Poem
418(3)
Annotated Poem: ``When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer''
421(5)
Sample Student Essay
422(4)
Some Guidelines for Writing Your Essays
426(5)
Practicing What You've Learned: ``Richard Cory''
428(3)
Writing In-Class Assignments
431(10)
Steps to Writing Well Under Pressure
431(10)
Practicing What You've Learned
438(1)
Assignment
438(1)
Summary
439(2)
PART FOUR A CONCISE HANDBOOK 441(51)
Major Errors in Grammar
443(20)
Errors with Verbs
443(6)
Practicing What You've Learned
448(1)
Errors with Nouns
449(1)
Errors with Pronouns
450(4)
Practicing What You've Learned
453(1)
Errors with Adverbs and Adjectives
454(1)
Errors in Modifying Phrases
455(2)
Practicing What You've Learned
456(1)
Errors in Sentences
457(6)
Practicing What You've Learned
458(1)
Practicing What You've Learned
459(3)
Practicing What You've Learned
462(1)
A Concise Guide to Punctuation
463(22)
The Period
464(1)
The question Mark
464(1)
The Exclamation Point
464(1)
The Comma
465(6)
Practicing What You've Learned
469(2)
The Semicolon
471(1)
The Colon
471(2)
Practicing What You've Learned
472(1)
The Apostrophe
473(1)
Quotation Marks
474(3)
Practicing What You've Learned
476(1)
Parentheses
477(1)
Brackets
478(1)
The Dash
479(1)
The Hyphen
480(1)
Underlining
481(1)
The Ellipsis Mark
482(3)
Practicing What You've Learned
483(2)
A Concise Guide to Mechanics
485(7)
Capitalization
485(2)
Abbreviations
487(1)
Numbers
487(3)
Practicing What You've Learned
488(2)
Spelling
490(2)
Copyright Acknowledgments 492(1)
Index 493


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