9781107029606

Structural Information Theory

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781107029606

  • ISBN10:

    1107029600

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2013-01-07
  • Publisher: Cambridge Univ Pr
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Summary

Structural information theory is a coherent theory about the way the human visual system organises a raw visual stimulus into objects and object parts. To humans, a visual stimulus usually has one clear interpretation even though, in theory, any stimulus can be interpreted in numerous ways. To explain this, the theory focuses on the nature of perceptual interpretations rather than on underlying process mechanisms and adopts the simplicity principle which promotes efficiency of internal resources rather than the likelihood principle which promotes veridicality in the external world. This theoretically underpinned starting point gives rise to quantitative models and verifiable predictions for many visual phenomena, including amodal completion, subjective contours, transparency, brightness contrast, brightness assimilation and neon illusions. It also explains phenomena such as induced temporal order, temporal context effects and hierarchical dominance effects, and extends to evaluative pattern qualities such as distinctiveness, interestingness and beauty.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Towards a Theory of Visual Form
Borders of perception
Attributes of visual form
Process and representation
Models and principles
Assumptions and foundations
Applications to Visual Form
Formal coding model
A perceptual coding manual
Preference effects
Time effects
Hierarchy effects
Extensions
Perception beyond SIT
SIT beyond perception
Overview
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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