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Structural Steel Design : LRFD Method,9780130479594
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Structural Steel Design : LRFD Method

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130479594

ISBN10:
0130479594
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $164.00
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Summary

This well-known book has been fully updated to conform to the 1999 Load and Resistance Factor (LRFD) Design Specification and to the 2002 edition of the LRFD Manual of Steel Construction. A problem-solving software package, included with each book, contains practical applications and enables users to better understand the relationship between analysis and design. chapter topics include specifications, loads, and methods of design; analysis and design of tension members; introduction to axially loaded compression members; design of axially loaded columns; design of beams for moments; bending and axial force; bolted connections; eccentrically loaded bolted connections and historical notes on rivets; welded connections; building connections; composite beams; composite columns; built-up beams, built-up wide-flange sections, and plate girders; design of steel buildings; and systems design. For practicing engineers originally trained to use the ASD procedure—this book will assist them in the transition to the LRFD method.

Table of Contents

Preface iii
Introduction to Structural Steel Design
1(35)
Advantages of Steel as a Structural Material
1(2)
Disadvantages of Steel as a Structural Material
3(1)
Early Uses of Iron and Steel
4(2)
Steel Sections
6(4)
Metric Units
10(1)
Cold-Formed Light-Gage Steel Shapes
11(1)
Stress-Strain Relationships in Structural Steel
12(4)
Modern Structural Steels
16(6)
Uses of High-Strength Steels
22(1)
Measurement of Toughness
23(1)
Jumbo Sections
24(1)
Lamellar Tearing
25(1)
Furnishing of Structural Steel
25(3)
The Work of the Structural Designer
28(1)
Responsibilities of the Structural Designer
28(1)
Economical Design of Steel Members
29(4)
Failure of Structures
33(1)
Handling and Shipping Structural Steel
34(1)
Calculation Accuracy
34(1)
Computers and Structural Steel Design
34(1)
Computer-Aided Design in this Text
35(1)
Specifications, Loads, and Methods of Design
36(25)
Specifications and Building Codes
36(2)
Loads
38(1)
Dead Loads
38(1)
Live Loads
39(3)
Environmental Loads
42(6)
Load and Resistance-Factor Design
48(1)
Load Factors
49(4)
Resistance Factors
53(1)
Discussion of Sizes of Load and Resistance Factors
54(1)
Reliability and the LRFD Specification
54(3)
Advantages of LRFD
57(1)
Computer Example
58(3)
Problems
61(1)
Analysis of Tension Members
61(37)
Introduction
61(3)
Design Strength of Tension Members
64(1)
Net Areas
65(3)
Effect of Staggered Holes
68(5)
Effective Net Areas
73(7)
Connecting Elements for Tension Members
80(1)
Block Shear
81(6)
Computer Example
87(11)
Problems
88(10)
Design of Tension Members
98(24)
Selection of Sections
98(6)
Built-Up Tension Members
104(4)
Rods and Bars
108(4)
Pin-Connected Members
112(3)
Design for Fatigue Loads
115(2)
Computer Example
117(5)
Problems
118(4)
Introduction to Axially Loaded Compression Members
122(32)
General
122(3)
Residual Stresses
125(1)
Sections Used for Columns
126(4)
Development of Column Formulas
130(1)
The Euler Formula
131(1)
End Restraint and Effective Lengths of Columns
132(4)
Stiffened and Unstiffened Elements
136(4)
Long, Short, and Intermediate Columns
140(1)
Column Formulas
140(2)
Maximum Slenderness Ratios
142(1)
Example Problems
142(5)
Computer Example
147(7)
Problems
148(6)
Design of Axially Loaded Columns
154(28)
Introduction
154(3)
LRFD Design Tables
157(4)
Column Splices
161(3)
Built-Up Columns
164(1)
Built-Up Columns with Components in Contact with Each Other
164(2)
Connection Requirements for Built-Up Columns whose Components are in Contact with Each Other
166(5)
Built-Up Columns with Components not in Contact with Each Other
171(5)
Introductory Remarks Concerning Flexural-Torsional Buckling of Compression Members
176(1)
Single-Angle Compression Members
177(1)
Computer Example
177(5)
Problems
178(4)
Design of Axially Loaded Compression Members, Continued
182(33)
Further Discussion of Effective Lengths
182(5)
Frames Meeting Alignment Chart Assumptions
187(2)
Frames not Meeting Alignment Chart Assumptions as to Joint Rotations
189(3)
Stiffness-Reduction Factors
192(3)
Columns Leaning on Each Other for In-Plane Design
195(4)
Base Plates for Concentrically Loaded Columns
199(10)
Computer Example
209(6)
Problems
211(4)
Introduction to Beams
215(26)
Types of Beams
215(1)
Sections Used as Beams
215(1)
Bending Stresses
216(1)
Plastic Hinges
217(1)
Elastic Design
218(1)
The Plastic Modulus
218(3)
Theory of Plastic Analysis
221(1)
The Collapse Mechanism
222(1)
The Virtual-Work Method
223(4)
Location of Plastic Hinge for Uniform Loadings
227(1)
Continuous Beams
228(2)
Building Frames
230(11)
Problems
232(9)
Design of Beams for Moments
241(33)
Introduction
241(3)
Yielding Behavior-Full Plastic Moment, Zone 1
244(2)
Design of Beams, Zone 1
246(7)
Lateral Support of Beams
253(2)
Introduction to Inelastic Buckling, Zone 2
255(3)
Moment Capacities, Zone 2
258(1)
Elastic Buckling, Zone 3
259(3)
Design Charts
262(3)
Noncompact Sections
265(2)
Computer Example
267(7)
Problems
268(6)
Design of Beams-Miscellaneous Topics
274(42)
Design of Continuous Beams
274(2)
Shear
276(6)
Deflections
282(5)
Webs and Flanges with Concentrated Loads
287(7)
Unsymmetrical Bending
294(2)
Design of Purlins
296(4)
The Shear Center
300(5)
Beam Bearing Plates
305(3)
Computer Example
308(8)
Problems
309(7)
Bending and Axial Force
316(33)
Occurence
316(1)
Members Subject to Bending and Axial Tension
317(3)
Computer Examples for Members Subject to Bending and Axial Tension
320(2)
First-Order and Second-Order Moments for Members Subject to Axial Compression and Bending
322(1)
Magnification Factors
323(2)
Moment Magnification or Cm Factors
325(4)
Review of Beam-Columns in Braced Frames
329(5)
Review of Beam-Columns in Unbraced Frames
334(2)
Design of Beam-Columns-Braced or Unbraced
336(7)
Computer Examples for Members Subject to Bending and Axial Compression
343(6)
Problems
345(4)
Bolted Connections
349(41)
Introduction
349(1)
Types of Bolts
349(1)
History of High-Strength Bolts
350(1)
Advantages of High-Strength Bolts
351(1)
Snug-Tight, Pretensioned, and Slip-Critical Bolts
351(3)
Methods for Fully Tensioning High-Strength Bolts
354(3)
Slip-Resistant Connections and Bearing-Type Connections
357(1)
Mixed Joints
358(1)
Sizes of Bolt Holes
359(1)
Load Transfer and Types of Joints
360(3)
Failure of Bolted Joints
363(1)
Spacing and Edge Distances of Bolts
363(4)
Bearing-Type Connections-Loads Passing Through Center of Gravity of Connections
367(9)
Slip-Critical Connections-Loads Passing Through Center of Gravity of Connections
376(6)
Computer Example
382(8)
Problems
383(7)
Eccentrically Loaded Bolted Connections and Historical Notes on Rivets
390(39)
Bolts Subjected to Eccentric Shear
390(13)
Bolts Subjected to Shear and Tension
403(3)
Tension Loads on Bolted Joints
406(2)
Prying Action
408(5)
Historical Notes on Rivets
413(1)
Types of Rivets
414(1)
Strength of Riveted Connections-Rivets in Shear
415(3)
Computer Example
418(11)
Problems
419(10)
Welded Connections
429(57)
General
429(1)
Advantages of Welding
430(1)
American Welding Society
431(1)
Types of Welding
431(4)
Prequalified Welding
435(1)
Welding Inspection
435(2)
Classification of Welds
437(3)
Welding Symbols
440(1)
Groove Welds
440(3)
Fillet Welds
443(2)
Strength of Welds
445(1)
LRFD Requirements
445(5)
Design of Simple Fillet Welds
450(5)
Design of Fillet Welds for Truss Members
455(5)
Shear and Torsion
460(7)
Shear and Bending
467(2)
Design of Moment-Resisting Connections
469(2)
Full-Penetration and Partial-Penetration Groove Welds
471(3)
Computer Examples
474(12)
Problems
475(11)
Building Connections
486(30)
Selection of Type of Fastener
486(1)
Type of Beam Connections
487(6)
Standard Bolted Beam Connections
493(4)
LRFD Manual Standard Connection Tables
497(1)
Designs of Standard Bolted Framed Connections
498(2)
Designs of Standard Welded Framed Connections
500(2)
Single-Plate or Shear Tab Framing Connections
502(3)
End-Plate Shear Connections
505(1)
Designs of Welded Seated Beam Connections
505(3)
Stiffened Seated Beam Connections
508(1)
Design of Moment-Resisting Connections
509(1)
Column Web Stiffeners
510(3)
Connection Design Aids-Handbooks and Computer Programs
513(3)
Problems
514(2)
Composite Beams
516(34)
Composite Construction
516(2)
Advantages of Composite Construction
518(1)
Discussion of Shoring
518(2)
Effective Flange Widths
520(1)
Shear Transfer
521(2)
Partially Composite Beams
523(1)
Strength of Shear Connections
524(1)
Number, Spacing, and Cover Requirements for Shear Connections
525(2)
Moment Capacity of Composite Sections
527(5)
Deflections
532(1)
Design of Composite Sections
533(8)
Continuous Composite Sections
541(1)
Design of Concrete-Encased Sections
542(8)
Problems
545(5)
Composite Columns
550(18)
Introduction
550(1)
Advantages of Composite Columns
551(2)
Disadvantages of Composite Columns
553(1)
Lateral Bracing
553(1)
Specifications for Composite Columns
554(1)
Axial Design Strengths of Composite Columns
555(3)
LRFD Tables
558(4)
Flexural Design Strengths of Composite Columns
562(1)
Axial Load and Bending Equation
562(1)
Design of Composite Columns Subject to Axial Load and Bending
563(2)
Load Transfer at Footings and Other Connections
565(3)
Problems
565(3)
Built-Up Beams, Built-Up Wide-Flange Sections, and Plate Girders
568(33)
Cover-Plated Beams
568(2)
Built-Up Wide Flange Sections
570(5)
Introduction to Plate Girders
575(2)
Plate Girder Proportions
577(3)
Detailed Proportions of Webs
580(2)
Design of Plate Girders with Slender Webs, but with Full Lateral Bracing for their Compact Compression Flanges
582(3)
Design of Plate Girders with Noncompact Flanges and without Full Lateral Bracing for Compression Flanges
585(5)
Design of Stiffeners
590(4)
Flexure-Shear Interaction
594(7)
Problems
600(1)
Design of Steel Buildings
601(40)
Introduction to Low-Rise Buildings
601(1)
Types of Steel Frames Used for Buildings
601(4)
Common Types of Floor Construction
605(1)
Concrete Slabs on Open-Web Steel Joists
606(3)
One-Way and Two-Way Reinforced Concrete Slabs
609(2)
Composite Floors
611(1)
Concrete-Pan Floors
612(2)
Steel-Decking Floors
614(1)
Flat Slabs
614(1)
Precast Concrete Floors
615(2)
Types of Roof Construction
617(1)
Exterior Walls and Interior Partitions
618(1)
Fireproofing of Structural Steel
619(1)
Introduction to High-Rise Buildings
620(1)
Discussion of Lateral Forces
621(2)
Types of Lateral Bracing
623(5)
Analysis of Buildings with Diagonal Wind Bracing for Lateral Forces
628(2)
Moment-Resisting Joints
630(2)
Analysis of Buildings with Moment-Resisting Joints for Lateral Loads
632(4)
Analysis of Buildings for Gravity Loads
636(3)
Design of Members
639(2)
Design of Steel Building Systems
641(20)
Introduction
641(5)
Design of Structural Steel Building
646(2)
Loads Acting on the Structural Frame
648(5)
Preliminary Design and Analysis
653(2)
Review of the Results and Design Changes
655(1)
The Design Sketches
656(1)
Concluding Comments
657(4)
Problems
658(3)
Appendix A Allowable Stress Design 661(17)
Appendix B Derivation of the Euler Formula 678(2)
Appendix C Slender Compression Elements 680(3)
Appendix D Flexural Torsional Buckling of Compression Members 683(6)
Appendix E Moment-Resisting Column Base Plates 689(8)
Appendix F Ponding 697(4)
Glossary 701(6)
Index 707

Excerpts

The authors' major objective in preparing this new edition was to update the text to conform to both the 1999 Load and Resistance Factor (LRFD) Design Specification and the 2002 edition of the LRFD Manual of Steel Construction. Among the several changes made in the new specification and included in the steel manual are the following: The inclusion of data and equations in both U.S. customary units and metric units. The introduction of two new important ASTM steels, A913 and A992. A few revisions in bolt criteria. Revised design procedure for fatigue loadings. A new section concerning the evaluation of existing structures. In addition to the revisions in the Specification, several changes and additions have been made in the text concerning the enclosed computer programs. First, the program previously named INSTEP has been updated to the new specifications and has been changed from a DOS format to a Windows format. It is now named INSTEP32. Though the program was written specifically to solve many of the textbook-type problems presented in this book, it has often been used by professional engineers in their design practices. Despite the practical applications of INSTEP32 and its value in teaching steel design, the authors feel that many professors would like their students to have some experience with at least one of the major commercial steel-design programs on the market today, in hopes that such experience would enable students to cross the bridge more quickly between the classroom and actual design practice. As a result, a student version of SAP 2000 has been included with INSTEP32 on the enclosed disk and presented herein. Use of this software will also enable the student to better understand the relationship between analysis and design. Chapter 20, a new chapter in the text, presents an introduction to the subject of systems design. In this regard, recent requirements for "capstone" courses in our engineering schools have made the subject of "open-ended" problems a serious component of design studies. Therefore, the topic of systems design along with "open-ended" problems and an introduction to SAP 2000 are included in Chapter 20. The authors wish to thank the following persons who reviewed this edition: Robert Abendroth, Daniel G. Linzell, Rolla Idriss, W. H. Walker, and Ahmad M. Itani. They also thank the reviewers and users of the previous editions of this book for their suggestions, corrections, and criticisms. They are always grateful to anyone who takes the time to contact them concerning any part of their book. Jack C. McCormac James K. Nelson


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