9780582068049

The Structure and History of Japanese: From Yamatokotoba to Nihongo

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780582068049

  • ISBN10:

    0582068045

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1999-07-01
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd

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Table of Contents

Preface xi
Chronological divisions in Japanese language history xii
Transliteration conventions xiii
Key to abbreviations and symbols xv
List of texts
xvii
Acknowledgements xix
Maps
xx
Language in Japanese culture
1(40)
Which Japanese?
1(1)
The Japanese Islands in early history
2(1)
Languages in contact: the Korean Peninsula and the Japanese Islands
3(3)
The genetic affiliations of Japanese
5(1)
Establishing the Chinese-Japanese diglossia
6(6)
The development of kana
10(2)
Waka and Japanese views of language
12(4)
The vernacular prestige language and the Heian nativist revival
16(6)
Linguistic variety: centre and periphery
22(5)
Edo-the long road towards a new prestige vernacular
24(3)
Language and the legitimizing power: Confucianism and nativism
27(4)
Achievements of the Edo grammarians
31(1)
Dutch learning
31(2)
Modernization and language modernization
33(6)
Ryukyu: standardization seen from the periphery
37(2)
Japanese (nihongo) as a prestige language
39(2)
Phonology
41(16)
Introduction
41(1)
Lexical strata and their characteristics
41(2)
Quantity and pitch accent
43(3)
Morae and moraic structures
43(2)
Morae and syllables
45(1)
The general accent rule and lexical accent
46(4)
Compounds and compound accent rules
47(2)
Semantic constraints on compound rules and rendaku
49(1)
Phrasal accent and intonation
50(1)
Innovation in accent systems
51(2)
Current accentual innovations in MJ
52(1)
Japanese accent systems-typology and history
53(4)
Indexicality
57(15)
Keigo `polite language'
57(12)
Predicate morphology of speech styles
60(1)
Verbs of giving and the nominal hierarchy
61(3)
Pronouns
64(2)
Demonstratives
66(1)
Directional demonstratives and personal reference
66(1)
Title and number
67(2)
Classification of nouns
69(3)
Numeral classifiers
70(2)
Predicate structures
72(54)
Predicate structure and clause structure
72(1)
Minimal predicates
73(4)
Maximal predicates
75(1)
Grammaticalization
76(1)
Serial verb constructions
77(4)
Modal auxiliaries
79(1)
MJ inflectional paradigms
80(1)
Adjectives as a word class
81(5)
The copula
82(2)
Other predicate nominals
84(2)
The-te iru construction
86(3)
Conspectus of CJ verb morphology
89(15)
OJ verb morphology and its reconstruction
93(2)
CJ tense
95(2)
CJ aspect
97(4)
CJ tense-mood categories in narratives
101(2)
Modern narrative categories?
103(1)
Directionality in MJ: -te kuru, -te iku
104(4)
Directionality in OJ-CJ
105(3)
The reanalysis of the OJ-CJ anterior conjunctor -te
108(9)
Innovative anterior constructions in CJ
109(3)
Post-CJ developments: perfect > progressive
112(1)
Aspect distinctions in modern dialects
113(2)
Ryukyu reflexes of OJ-CJ innovations
115(2)
Post-CJ developments in verb inflectional paradigms
117(3)
The MJ potential form
118(2)
The MJ innovation of predicate-final copula
120(6)
A historical perspective on copula-last predicates
122(4)
Topic, focus and case
126(59)
Introduction
126(1)
Topic and focus
126(7)
Adjuncts without case or pragmatic particles
128(1)
Dislocation
129(3)
Multiple topics
132(1)
The pragmatic particles, wa and mo
133(6)
Locative particles kara and made
136(2)
The notion of subject
138(1)
Between pragmatics and case
139(1)
Governed and circumstantial adjuncts
139(3)
Syntactic neutralization of case inside complex noun phrases
140(1)
Case and the syntax of numerals
141(1)
Valence and semantic specifications of adjuncts
142(14)
Verbs of emotion
143(2)
Locative verbs
145(1)
Actional locative de
146(1)
Intransitive verbs
146(1)
suru `do'
147(1)
Verbal nouns and suru
148(3)
suru `do' and yaru `do'
151(1)
Passive
152(2)
Causative
154(2)
Divalent stative predicates
156(2)
Historical perspectives
158(11)
OJ-CJ ga and no
158(3)
ga and no in Kyushu and Ryukyu dialects
161(1)
Governed case relations in OJ-CJ
162(2)
Locative case formations in OJ-CJ
164(2)
te-augmentation and the circumstantial case relations
166(3)
The OJ-CJ focus-type sentences
169(6)
Case and focus in OJ-CJ and beyond
171(3)
Case and focus in Ryukyu
174(1)
The historical development of the copula
175(2)
Japanese adjectival morphology
177(8)
Demonstratives, focus, case, copula and adjectival morphology
180(5)
Sentence structures
185(28)
Clause structure and interclausal cohesion
185(3)
Interclausal choesion
185(1)
Accent and predicate structure
186(2)
Morphophonology of the anterior te-form and its derived auxiliaries
188(6)
Non-anterior -(r)u and anterior -ta
189(1)
-(r)u and -ta in narratives
190(1)
Modal functions of -ta and -te
191(1)
The clause conjunctors -i as opposed to -te
192(2)
The conditionals -to, -ba and -tara
194(1)
Adnominal clauses
195(3)
-te no clauses
197(1)
-r(u) and -ta in adnominal clauses
198(1)
The distinction between no and koto
198(5)
to-complements and the question of direct-indirect speech
199(4)
S no da
203(3)
S node and S kara
204(2)
Historical perspectives: some CJ sentence structures
206(7)
Complement structures in OJ
206(1)
From case particle to clause particle
207(2)
Narrated discourse in CJ
209(4)
A summary of historical developments
213(4)
Glossary 217(4)
List of references 221(21)
Index 242

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