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Student Teacher to Master Teacher : A Practical Guide for Educating Students with Special Needs,9780130413727
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Student Teacher to Master Teacher : A Practical Guide for Educating Students with Special Needs

by ; ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780130413727

ISBN10:
0130413720
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $66.00
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  • Student Teacher to Master Teacher : A Practical Guide for Educating Students with Special Needs
    Student Teacher to Master Teacher : A Practical Guide for Educating Students with Special Needs




Summary

This book recognizes the breadth of information and teaching skills new special education teachers must demonstrate in order to be effective. In response, this reflective guide offers realistic, structured activities to help student teachers transition from pre-service training to meeting the challenges of teaching students with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include: Field Experiences with Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities; Legal Aspects of Special Education; Setting Up for Instruction; Classroom Assessment Practices for Instruction; Planning for Instruction; Delivering Instruction; The Paperwork; Classroom Management; Student and Family Transitions; Collaborative Programming and Consultation; and The Master Teacher. For new special education teachers.

Table of Contents

Field Experiences with Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
1(28)
Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Definitions and Characteristics
3(7)
Categories of Mild to Moderate Disabilities
4(5)
Category-Free Descriptions
9(1)
How Special Education Services Are Delivered
10(6)
Continuum of Services
10(3)
Inclusive Education
13(3)
Roles and Responsibilities
16(8)
University Supervisor
16(1)
Cooperating Teacher
17(1)
Practicum Student
17(7)
Preparing for a Successful Practicum Experience
24(1)
Summary
25(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
25(1)
Point and Click
26(1)
References
27(2)
Legal Aspects of Special Education
29(28)
Legal Basis of Educational Rights for Students with Disabilities
31(8)
Specific Legislation
31(3)
Specific Litigation
34(1)
Recurring Legal Themes
35(2)
Central Themes
37(2)
Major Components of the Federal Law
39(8)
Full Range of Services
40(1)
Suspensions, Explusions, and Alternative Interim Educational Placements
40(1)
Incentives for the LRE
40(1)
IEP Development and Access to the General Educational Curriculum
41(1)
Referral, Evaluation, and Placement Guidelines
41(2)
Procedural Safeguards
43(4)
Major Challenges of IDEA for Developing Teachers
47(7)
Related Legislation
47(2)
How Can Teachers Demonstrate Implementation of Special Education Laws
49(1)
Legal and Professional Responsibilities of New Teachers
50(1)
Provision of Fape
50(1)
Efforts Within the Educational System
51(1)
Using Mediation and Professional Attitudes During Litigation
52(1)
Advocacy for New and Better Legislation
53(1)
Summary
54(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
54(1)
Point and Click
55(1)
References
56(1)
Setting Up for Instructions
57(2)
Designing the Physical Environment
59(3)
Public and Prevate Space
59(2)
Furniture
61(1)
Easy lines of Vision
62(1)
Storage of Instructional Materials
62(1)
Aesthetics
62(1)
Managing Instructional time
62(5)
Levels of Instructional time
63(1)
Strategies for Time Management
63(4)
Scheduling Activities and Grouping Students
67(8)
Scheduling Activities
68(4)
Grouping Students
72(3)
Formulating Meaningful and Relevant Rules and Procedures
75(4)
Introducing Rules and Procedures
76(1)
Maintaining the Integrity of Rules and Procedures
77(1)
Developing Routines and Procedures
77(2)
Coordinating Resources
79(1)
Using the IEP as a Living and Working Document
79(1)
Keeping Files and Materials Organized and Accessible
79(1)
Appropriate Use of Technology Based-Resources
79(1)
Preparing a Substitute Teacher's Packet
80(1)
Being Aware of School- and Community-Based Support Services
80(2)
Summary
82(1)
Activities to Extend Your KNowledge
82(1)
Point and Click
83(1)
References
83(2)
Classroom Assessment Practice for Instruction
85(119)
Stephanie L. Carpenter
Margaret E. King-Sears
Johns Hopkins
Purposes for Classroom Assessment
87(6)
Identify Students' Entry-Level Competencies
87(4)
Monitor Students' Performance During Instruction
91(1)
Determine Students' Mastery of Competencies
91(2)
Monitor Student's Maintenance and Generalization of Competencies
93(1)
Principles of Assessment
93(3)
Critical Skills Are Selected for Assessment
93(1)
Data Are Collected in a Systematic Manner
94(2)
Data on Student Performance Are Collected Frequently
96(1)
Approaches to Classroom Assessment
96(10)
Authentic, Performance, and Portfolio Assessment
96(6)
Curriculum-Based Assessment
102(4)
Apply Case Study 1: Fractions and Decimals
106(9)
Apply Case Study 2: High School Essays
110(1)
Apply Case Study 3: Sight Word Recognition
111(3)
Grading Practices
114(1)
Summary
114(1)
Activities to Extend Your KNowledge
115(4)
Point and Click
115(1)
References
116(3)
Planning for Instruction
119(36)
Reasons for Planning
120(1)
Planning Increases the Probability of Effective Teaching
120(1)
Planning Increases Confidence, Security, and Direction
121(1)
Planning Helps Establish Good Habits
121(1)
Developmental Aspect of Lesson Planning
121(1)
Relationship of Planning to the Diagnostic Teaching Model
122(3)
Strategic and Tactical Planning
125(1)
Components of Successfully Planned Lessons
126(14)
Prerequisite Skills
126(1)
Instructional Objectives
126(4)
Instructional Activities and Materials to Be Used
130(4)
Methods to Evaluate Lessons
134(2)
Adaptations and Modifications
136(2)
Anticipated Problems
138(1)
Self-Evaluation of Lesson Plans
139(1)
Lesson-Plan Formats
140(7)
Daily Lesson Plans
140(4)
Unit Plans
144(3)
Strategic Planning for Inclusive Programming
147(3)
Lesson Plans and Computer Technology
148(2)
Summary
150(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
151(1)
Point and Click
151(1)
References
152(3)
Delivering Instruction
155(50)
Introduction
156(1)
Direct Instruction and Guided Discovery Learning: Principles for Effective Instruction
157(21)
Direct Instruction
158(7)
Teaching Models Related to Teacher-Directed Instruction
165(4)
Guided Discovery Learning
169(4)
Teaching Models Related to Guided Discovery Learning
173(5)
Procedures for Presenting Subject Matter
178(5)
Presentation of Conceptual Knowledge
178(3)
Presentation of Academic Rules
181(2)
Learning Stages
183(5)
Acquisition (Introduction and Discrimination)
183(3)
Fluency Building
186(1)
Maintenance
187(1)
Generalization
187(1)
Lesson Development
188(5)
Initiating a Lesson
188(2)
Engaging Students During Instruction
190(3)
Closing a Lesson: Ending Review
193(1)
Lesson Format for Direct Instruction and Guided Discovery Learning Approaches
193(3)
Acquisition Stage---Introduction
194(1)
Acquisition Stage---Discrimination
194(1)
Fluency-Building Stage
195(1)
Maintenance Stage
195(1)
Generalization Stage
196(1)
When to Use Specific Elements of Effective Instruction
196(2)
Teaching Concepts and Academic Rules by Using the DI and GDL Models
196(1)
Stages of Learning
197(1)
Lesson Development
197(1)
Summary
198(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
199(1)
Point and Click
200(1)
References
201(4)
The Paperwork
205(46)
Simulated Case Example
206(1)
Developing Useful Paperwork: A Rationale
207(3)
Typical Procedures Used for Screening-Preferred, Referral, and Classification
210(12)
Screening-Prereferral Process
211(1)
Paperwork in the Referral Process
212(2)
Present Educational Setting
214(1)
Classroom Diversity
214(1)
Data Collection by Multiple Professionals
215(1)
Prereferral Strategy Implementation
215(3)
Professional Observations
218(2)
Case Study Conference Results
220(1)
Summary of Present Educational Setting Documentation
220(2)
Formalized Testing
222(12)
Collection and Results of Sensory Screenings
222(2)
Consent for Individualized Testing
224(2)
Individualized Battery
226(1)
Testing Requirements
226(1)
Explanation and Interpretation of Formal Testing
226(4)
Eligibility Meeting
230(3)
Pertinent Questions of Formal Testing Results
233(1)
Summary of the Formalized Testing Situation
233(1)
Individualized Education Programs
234(11)
Consent for Placement by Parents
235(3)
The IEP as a Working Document
238(1)
Effective IEP Meetings
238(4)
Requirements of Annual Updated IEPs
242(1)
Results and Implications of Reevaluations
242(3)
Writing Reports to Parents and to Other Professionals
245(3)
Who Can Help the Novice Teacher Understand the Ins and Outs of Paperwork?
247(1)
Complying with Monitoring and Evaluation Procedures
247(1)
Summary
248(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
248(1)
Point and Click
249(1)
References
249(2)
Classroom Management
251(2)
Comprehensive School and Classroom Management Programs
253(1)
Preventing Problem Behaviors
254(5)
Effective Instruction
255(1)
An Appropriate Management Perspective
255(2)
Preparation
257(1)
Physical Environment
257(2)
Developing Rules, Procedures, and Behavioral Supports
259(3)
Taking Action: Responding to Student Misbehavior
262(6)
Surface Management Techniques
262(1)
Conducting a Functional Behavioral Assessment
263(1)
Development of Consequences
264(2)
Crisis Management
266(2)
Resolving Student Misbehavior
268(5)
Generic Behavioral Strategies
268(5)
Promoting Self-Control and Problem Solving
273(2)
Self-Control
273(1)
Problem Solving
274(1)
Designing and Implementing Individual Behavior-Change Interventions
275(4)
Rationale and Current Intervention Efforts
275(1)
Pinpointing a Target Behavior
276(1)
Selecting an Observation and Recording Procedure
276(1)
Obtaining Baseline Measures of Targeted Behavior
276(1)
Setting Goal
276(2)
Administering the Intervention
278(1)
Analyzing Results Continuously
278(1)
Completing Follow-Up and Maintenance Procedures
278(1)
Summary
279(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
280(1)
Point and Click
280(1)
References
281(2)
Student and Family Transitions
283(315)
Janeen M. Taylor
Transitions Faced by Students and Families
284(20)
Transition Issues in Families of Young Children
286(1)
Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education
287(7)
Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs)
294(8)
Teachers' Work with Families
302(1)
Elementary and Middle School Students' Transitions
303(1)
Linking School Opportunities
304(4)
IEPs and Students' Transitions
304(2)
High School Students' Transitions
306(1)
Interagency Coordination Efforts
307(1)
Teachers' Roles as Students Age
308(2)
Facilitating the Transition Process for Older Students and Their Families
308(2)
Summary
310(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
311(1)
Point and Click
312(1)
References
312(3)
Collaborative Programming and Consultation
315(24)
Introduction
316(2)
The Beginning Teacher as the Recipient of Consulting Services
318(5)
Appreciating the Competence of Other Professionals
319(1)
Making the Most of Consultative Services
320(1)
Accepting Constructive Criticism
321(2)
The Developing and Beginning Teacher as the Provider of Consulting Services
323(1)
Collaborative Model for Consultative Processes
324(3)
Consensual Decision Making
324(1)
Balance of Control
325(2)
Interpersonal Communication Skills
327(4)
General procedures for Collaborative Consultation
331(2)
Three Basic Procedures
331(2)
Operationalizing Conference Procedures
333(2)
Summary
335(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
336(1)
Point and Click
336(1)
References
337(2)
The Master Teacher
339(50)
Professional Preparation Standards
340(2)
Chronic Shortages
342(1)
The Job Search
342(17)
Equal Opportunity Employment Procedures
342(1)
Posting Teaching Opportunities
343(1)
Employee Searches
344(1)
Professional Application, Resume, and Cover Letter
344(3)
Professional References
347(4)
College Transcripts, Verification of Previous Employment, and Teaching Credentials
351(4)
Completed Credentials Files
355(1)
Face-to-Face Interviews
356(2)
Candidate Recommendations
358(1)
Preparation of Professional Portfolios
359(2)
Professional Portfolio Purposes
359(1)
Portfolio Evidence
359(1)
Professional Portfolio Process
360(1)
Moving from Student Teacher to Master Teacher: Working Effectively in Partnerships
361(22)
Cooperative Approaches
361(2)
Team Approach
363(1)
Teacher Induction Programs
364(1)
Mentoring Activities
365(1)
Working with Students' Parents or Guardians
366(3)
Making Teaming Work
369(1)
Peer Observations
370(1)
Managing Paraprofessionals
370(1)
Strategies Useful With Paraprofessionals
371(2)
Teacher Stress and Burnout
373(3)
Stress and Special Educators
376(4)
A Teacher Career Cycle: Facilitating the Master Teacher Process
380(1)
Advancement Within the Field
380(1)
Involvement in Professional Organizations
380(1)
Involvement in Professional Development Activities
380(1)
Higher Degrees
381(1)
Certifications
381(1)
Analyzing Personal Philosophies: What Can Teachers Do to Remain Committed to their Careers?
381(1)
Summary
382(1)
Activities to Extend Your Knowledge
382(1)
Point and Click
383(1)
References
384(5)
Appendix CEC Code of Ethics and Standards for Professional Practice for Special Educators 389(4)
Index 393

Excerpts

Our basic purpose in preparing the third edition ofStudent Teacher to Master Teacherwas to provide a reflective guide for use during supervised special education student teaching experiences or graduate field experience. We believe that field experiences are often the single most important component of a preservice level teacher development program. The approach used in our guide is based on two interrelated assumptions. First, we believe that student teaching and initial field experiences should be rigorous and as realistic as possible. They should be developed to ensure that the preservice-level teacher enters the professional job market with the skills needed for both immediate survival and continued success. Few teacher educators would question this view, and many may regard it as an obvious, somewhat pious, statement of fact. Interpretation and actual implementation of this view appear to vary considerably, however, affecting the validity of the basic assumption in reference to specific teacher-training programs. In the absence of structured and purposeful activities or requirements, there may be no valid criteria for assessing easily delineated teaching skills across varied settings. In fact, the apparent discrepancy between theory and successful application may significantly reduce program credibility. Second, special education field experiences should incorporate a variety of structured requirements and activities that collectively "bridge the gap" between methods and/or laboratory courses and actual independent, professional teaching. We recognize the need for more structured, reality-based, and relevant preservice experiences. When observing, supervising, managing, and evaluating preservice and beginning teachers, we found a critical need to link preservice training and field experience requirements to real teaching skills and actual on-the-job requirements. Topics and activities in this guide were chosen because we believe they represent many of the most pertinent issues that new teachers will face when they begin their field experiences or when they manage their first classrooms on their own. Through our own experiences as classroom teachers and supervisors of developing teachers, we also realized the needs of college supervisors. We believe that individuals involved with the supervision of student teachers and field-experience students often are the forgotten souls, desperately trying to promote best practices in the face of problems of logistics, timing, and realities of modern schools. Often, these are individuals who must face experienced teachers' claims to novice teachers that "it can't be done like that" or "theory is only relevant in textbooks and it will never work here." To the university instructors' calls for "increased best practices" in the classrooms, we believe that college supervisors will welcome a commercially prepared resource to aid them in their roles. This guide was developed to reduce the amount of time needed by supervisory faculty and staff in the review and possible remediation of key concepts associated with successful teaching. We hope the use of this guide will allow more time for the important job of observing and providing feedback to preservice teachers and for supervisors' liaisons to classroom teachers and administrators, university faculty, and preservice teachers. In summary, throughout this guide we provide tips and insights to preservice and beginning teachers to help them grow professionally with their chosen career over time, starting during their initial field experiences and continuing through their beginning years in teaching. We recognize the enormous amount of information that teachers new to special education must obtain and be able to demonstrate during their initial work with students with mild to moderate disabilities. This guide is meant to help new teachers make the transition from the role of student at the preservice level to th


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