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STUDENT TEACHING: EARLY CHILDHOOD PRACTICUM GUIDE 4E,9780766810563
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STUDENT TEACHING: EARLY CHILDHOOD PRACTICUM GUIDE 4E

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780766810563

ISBN10:
0766810569
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/14/2000
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $112.00

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Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 8/14/2000.
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Summary

This book is designed to assist early childhood education student teachers, professionals, and interns in teaching children from 3 to 8 years of age. Student Teaching provides step-by-step instruction through the process of field experiences. It covers areas such as planning developmentally appropriate practice and working with parents.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Acknowledgments xiii
About the Authors xiv
SECTION I: Orientation to Student Teaching
Introduction to Student Teaching Practicum
2(42)
Training Guidelines
3(1)
Initial Feelings
4(1)
The Mechanics of Student Teaching
4(1)
Key Participants Play a Role in Student Teacher Development
4(1)
Before Placements
5(3)
Orientation
8(3)
Professionalism
11(7)
Student Teaching Goals
18(2)
Preparing for Your First Days
20(1)
Meeting with the Administrator
21(1)
Your Classroom
22(2)
Beginning Days
24(2)
Becoming a Team Member
26(1)
Goals of the Team and Program
26(18)
A Student Teacher's Values and Developing Teaching Style
44(21)
Knowing Yourself and Your Values
45(1)
The Acquisition of Values
46(3)
Your Values
49(1)
Personal Values and Activities
50(1)
Professional Ethics
51(1)
Teaching Style
51(6)
Other Teaching Styles
57(8)
Being Observed: Discovering Your Competencies
65(41)
Goals of Observation, Evaluation, and Discussion
66(1)
Methods of Observation
67(4)
Clinical Supervision
71(2)
Reliability
73(11)
Peer Evaluations
84(3)
Competency-based Training
87(1)
The Whole Teacher
87(3)
Reflective Behaviors in Student Teachers
90(1)
Critical Thinking
91(1)
Self-Perception
92(3)
Self-Analysis
95(11)
SECTION II: Programming
Review of Child Development and Learning Theory
106(25)
Theories of Child Development
107(1)
How Do Children Learn?
108(11)
Review of Selected Current Research
119(4)
Student Teacher Intelligent Behavior
123(8)
Instructional Planning
131(53)
A Way to Look at Early Childhood Curriculum
132(1)
Identifying Child Interests
133(2)
Constructivism and Developmentally Appropriate Practice
135(3)
Other Curriculum Approaches
138(1)
Activity Resources
139(1)
Curriculum
140(3)
How Language Instruction Fits into All Activity Planning
143(9)
Goals and Objectives
152(1)
Developmental Skills
153(3)
Other Activity Plan Areas
156(1)
Transitions
157(3)
Working with Groups
160(5)
Thematic Teaching
165(19)
SECTION III: Classroom Management Revisited
Classroom Management Goals and Techniques
184(31)
Classroom Management
185(3)
The Guidance Function in Classroom Management
188(2)
Child Empowerment
190(4)
Classroom Management Techniques
194(7)
Additional Management Strategies
201(6)
Guidance Techniques Used in Elementary Schools
207(8)
Analyzing Behavior to Promote Self-Control
215(27)
Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development and Its Relation to Self-Control
216(8)
Burton White and Self-Control
224(4)
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and Its Relation to Self-Control
228(4)
A Case Study to Analyze
232(1)
Cultural Differences
233(9)
SECTION IV: Communication
Common Problems of Student Teachers
242(34)
Kinds of Problems
243(3)
Seeking Help
246(5)
The Role of Communication
251(5)
Listening: The Ability to Receive
256(5)
Theories in Problem Solving
261(1)
A Problem-Solving Process
262(14)
SECTION V: The Child
Case Studies, Analysis, and Applications
276(26)
Case Studies
277(1)
Observation Forms
277(3)
Analysis of Observation
280(8)
Observation and Conjecture
288(14)
Working With Special Needs Children
302(22)
Laws Relating to the Education of Young Children with Special Needs
303(3)
``Special'' Children
306(9)
Working with Special Needs Children
315(9)
SECTION VI: Parents
The Changing American Family
324(21)
The American Family in the New Millenium
325(1)
Changes Mandated by the New Welfare Law
326
Early Childhood Education in the Twentieth Century
321(9)
Parents as Volunteers
330(2)
How to Motivate Parents to Volunteer
332(13)
Parents and Student Teachers
345(29)
Interacting with Parents
346(1)
The Importance of Parent-Teacher Relationships
347(2)
Models of Communication
349(7)
Planning the Home Visit
356(2)
The Home Visit
358(2)
Other Home-School Interactions
360(14)
SECTION VII: Professional Concerns
Quality Programs
374(21)
Meeting Children's Needs
375(3)
Standard of Quality Programs
378(1)
Types of Quality Programs
379(1)
Who Decides the Quality of a Program?
380(4)
Acceditation and Its Relationship to Quality
384(3)
Total Quality Management
387(1)
The Comer Project for Change in Education
387(1)
Mentoring Programs
388(1)
State Legislative Awareness
388(1)
Defining an Optimal Education and Care System
388(7)
Professional Commitment and Growth
395(19)
Definitions
396(1)
Concerns in the Profession
396(1)
Professional Behavior and Commitment
397(2)
Professional Growth and Development
399(4)
Professional Growth Opportunities
403(5)
Parents' Attitudes Toward Professionalism
408(6)
Trends and Issues
414(24)
Trends
415(9)
Issues
424(14)
SECTION VIII: Infant/Toddler Placements
Student Teaching With Infants and Toddlers
438(28)
Standards
439(1)
Characteristics of a Quality Infant/Toddler Center
439(5)
Student Teaching with Infants and Toddlers
444(1)
Approaching and Working with Children
444(2)
General Rules and Regulations
446(7)
Caregiving as a Teaching Activity
453(1)
A Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers
454(1)
Activities in the Infant/Toddler Center
454(4)
Child's Physical Environment
458(1)
Awareness of Your Own Needs as a Caregiver
459(2)
Safety
461(5)
Appendix 466(39)
Glossary 505(6)
Index 511


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