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The Student Writer: Editor and Critic,9780073383804
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The Student Writer: Editor and Critic

by
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780073383804

ISBN10:
0073383805
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/15/2009
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
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Summary

Written with the kind of supportive tone found in a writing workshop, this three-in-one rhetoric/reader/handbook puts students in control of developing their own writing processes by teaching them how to become astute critics and editors of their work. Now in full-color, the eighth edition of The Student Writer offers new chapters on research, enhanced coverage of visual rhetoric including a new appendix on document design, new and enhanced coverage of plagiarism, and more

Table of Contents

Strategies for Reading and Writing
The Reading-Writing Connection
Reading Analytically
Preview the Material
Read Thoughtfully
Review and Write for Retention
A Sample Marked Text
“School Is Bad for Children”
Writing in Response to Reading
Writing a Summary
“What John Holt Finds Wrong with Schools”
Sharing Personal Reactions and Associations
“School Was Bad for Me”
Evaluating an Author’s Ideas
Essays for Reading and Response
“Democracy”
“The Environmental Issue from Hell”
Analyzing Visual Content
Analyzing Advertisements
Analyzing Photographs
Analyzing Charts and Graphs
Getting Started
The Writing Process
Six Areas of the Writing Process
Choosing a Writing Topic
Pay Attention to the World around You
Freewrite
Fill in the Blanks
Narrow a Broad Topic
Freewrite
Write a List
Consider the Patterns of Development
Map Your Broad Topic
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: Discovering a Writing Topic
Establishing Your Purpose
Identifying and Assessing Your Audience
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: Establishing Purpose and Identifying and Assessing Audience
Discovering Ideas to Develop Your Topic
Freewrite
Write a List
Answer Questions
Write a Map
Write a Letter
Investigate Sources
Keep a Journal
Working Collaboratively: Discovering Ideas
Prewriting at the Computer
Process Guidelines: Breaking Through Writer’s Block
Developing a Preliminary Thesis
The Qualities of an Effective Thesis
Process Guidelines: How to Draft Your Preliminary Thesis
Process Guidelines: The Sequence of Your Writing Process
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: Discovering Ideas and Developing a Preliminary Thesis
Writing Assignment
Organizing and Drafting
Process Guidelines: Evaluating Your Ideas
Ordering Your Ideas
Chronological Order
Spatial Order
Progressive Order
Outlining
The Formal Outline
Outline Cards
The Outline Worksheet
The Outline Tree
The Scratch Outline
Process Guidelines: Outlining
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: Outlining
Writing Your First Draft
Structuring Your Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essay
Marcie Katz Banning Alcohol on College Campuses
The Introduction
Process Guidelines: Drafting Introductions
Body Paragraphs
Qualities of an Effective Topic Sentence
Placement of the Topic Sentence
The Implied Topic Sentence
Qualities of an Effective Supporting Details
When to Begin a New Paragraph
Process Guidelines: Drafting Body Paragraphs
The Conclusion
Process Guidelines: Drafting Conclusions
Drafting the Title of Your Essay
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: The First Draft
Writing Assignment
Revising for Content and Organization
Process Guidelines: Preparing to Revise
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: Revising Content
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: Revising Organization
Achieving Coherence
Use Transitions to Achieve Coherence
Use Repetition to Achieve Coherence
Use Transitions and Repetition to Achieve Coherence between Paragraphs
Working Collaboratively: Revising with Reader Response
Process Guidelines: Revising with Reader Response
Process Guidelines: Breaking through Writer’s Block
Revising at the Computer
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: Revising the First Draft
Revising for Effective Expression
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: Revising Sentences
Use Active Voice
Use Coordination
Use Subordination
Achieve Sentence Variety
Use Parallel Structure
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: Revising Diction
Use an Appropriate Level of Diction
Use Words with an Appropriate Connotation
Avoid Colloquial Language
Use Specific Diction
Use Simple Diction
Use Gender-Neutral, Inoffensive Language
Eliminate Wordiness
Avoid Clichés
Process Guidelines: Revising Sentences and Words
Computer Tips for Revising Sentences and Words
Anthony’s Essay in Progress: The Final Draft
Patterns of Development
Description
Why Is Description Important?
Occasions for Writing: Description across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Description with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Focus Your Description with a Dominant Impression
Determine Your Need for Objective and Subjective Description
Use Concrete Sensory Detail
Use Similes, Metaphors, and Personification
Consider Your Purpose and Audience
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing Description
Visualizing a Descriptive Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“A Day at the Fair”
“My First Flight”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“The Sounds of the City”
“Anguished Cries in a Place of Silence”
Combining Patterns of Development
“Where Nothing Says Everything”
Organization Note: Short Paragraphs
Description in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Description
Narration
Why Is Narration Important?
Occasions for Writing: Narration across the Disciplines and Beyoe
Combining Narration with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Answer the Journalist’s Questions
Write Dialogue
Describe a Person, Place, or Scene
Tell Your Story for a Reason
Consider Your Purpose and Audience
Be a Responsible Writer
Using Sources for a Purpose
Organizing Narration
Visualizing a Narrative Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“The Ball Game”
“The Great Buffalo Hunt”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“The Girl in Gift Wrap”
“The Boys”
Combining Patterns of Development
“The Telephone”
Punctuation Note: Parentheses
Narration in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Narration
Exemplification
Why Is Exemplification Important?
Occasions for Writing: Exemplification across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Exemplification with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Consider Examples from a Variety of Sources
Use Description and Narration as Examples
Use Hypothetical Examples
Use the Right Number of Examples
Consider Your Purpose and Audience
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing Exemplification
Visualizing an Exemplification Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“Ocean of Tears”
“Let’s Just Ban Everything”
Student Essay with Research
“Media Stereotyping of Muslims as
Terrorists” Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“Darkness at Noon”
“Shoddy Service”
Combining Patterns of Development
“Speech Codes: Alive and Well at Colleges”
Style Note: Sarcasm
Exemplification in anl Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Exemplification
Process Analysis
Why Is Process Analysis Important?
Occasions for Writing: Process Analysis across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Process Analysis with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Include All the Important Steps
Explain How a Step is Performed
Explain the Significance of a Step or Why It Is Performed
Explain Trouble Spots and What Not to Do
Mention Necessary Items and Define Unfamiliar Terms
Include Examples and Description
Use Visuals
Consider Your Purpose and Audience
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing a Process Analysis
Visualizing a Process Analysis Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“A Visit to Candyland”
“Feng Shui in the Bedroom and Workplace”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“How to Take a Job Interview”
“Wicked Wind”
Combining Patterns of Development
“Annie Smith Swept Here”
Sthle Note: Point of View
Process Analysis in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Process Analysis
Comparison-Contrast
Why Is Comparison-Contrast Important?
Occasions for Writing: Comparison-Contrast across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Comparison-Contrast with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Include Enough Points of Comparison and Contrast
Draw on Other Patterns to Explain Points of Comparison and Contrast
Maintain Balance between the Points Discussed
Consider Your Audience and Purpose
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing Comparison-Contrast
Visualizing a Comparison-Contrast Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“The Human and the Superhuman: Two Very Different Heroes”
“Like Mother like Daughter”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“A Fable for Tomorrow”
“That Lean and Hungry Look”
Combining Patterns of Development
“This Is Your Nation on Steroids”
Development Note: Dialogue
Comparison-Contrast in anImage
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Comparison-Contrast
Cause-and-Effect Analysis
Why Is Cause-and-Effect Analysis Important?
Occasions for Writing: Cause-and-Effect Analysis across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Cause-and-Effect Analysis with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Report Multiple Causes and Effects
Identify Underlying Causes and Effects
Prove That Something Is a Cause or Effect
Identify Immediate and Remote Causes
Reproduce Causal Chains
Explain Why Something Is or Is Not a Cause or an Effect
Consider Your Audience and Purpose
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing Cause-and-Effect Analysis
Visualizing Cause-and-Effect Analysis
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“Mom, There’s a Coyote in the Backyard!”
“Athletes on Drugs: It’s Not So Hard to Understand”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“Why Marriages Fail”
“It’s Not Just How We Play That Matters”
Combining Patterns of Development
“Our Schedules, Ourselves”
Diction Note: Specific Diction
Cause-and-Effect Analysis in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Cause-and-Effect Analysis
Definition
Why Is Definition Important?
Occasions for Writing: Definition across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Definition with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Write a Stipulative Definition
Draw on Other Patterns of Development
Compare or Contrast the Term with Related Words
Explain What Your Term Is Not
Consider Your Audience and Purpose
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing Definition
Visualizing a Definition Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“Parenthood: Don’t Count on Sleeping until They Move Out”
“What Is Writer’s Block”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“Hero Inflation”
“My Way!”
Combining Patterns of Development
“The Pajama Game”
Development Note: Questions
Definition in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines for Writing Definition
Classification and Division
Why Are Classification and Division Important?
Occasions for Writing: Definition across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Classification and Division with Other Patterns
Selecting Detail
Have a Principle of Classification or Division
Be Sure All Categories or Components Conform to Your Principle of Classification or Division
Use Mutually Exclusive Categories
Explain Each Category or Component
Consider Your Audience and Purpose
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing Classification and Division
Visualizing Classification and Division
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“Grocery Shoppers”
“Horror Movies”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“The Plot Against People”
“The Truth about Lying”
“Growing Up Asian in America”
Combining Patterns of Development
“The Ways of Meeting Oppression”
Punctuation Note: The Dash
Division in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Classification and Division
Combining Patterns of Development
Why Is Combining Patterns Important?
Occasions for Writing: Combining Patterns across the Disciplines and Beyond
Combining Classification and Division with Other Patterns
Selecting and Organizing Detail
Learning from Another Writer: A Student Essay
“The Many Ways to Watch a Show”
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“Hold the Mayonnaise”
“Juvenile Injustice”
“Boy Brains, Girl Brains”
Development Note: Quoting Authorities
Combining Patterns in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Combining Patterns
Using the Patterns of Development
Argumentation
Why Is Argumentation Important?
Occasions for Writing: Argumentation across the Disciplines and Beyond
Finding an Issue and Establishing Your Claim
Consider Your Audience and Purpose
Kinds of Support
Logical Appeals
Sources of Reasons and Evidence
Inductive and Deductive Reasoning
Avoiding Logical Fallacies
Emotional Appeals
Ethical Appeals
Raising and Countering Objections
Creating Goodwill
Using the Patterns of Development
Be a Responsible Writer
Organizing an Argument Essay
Visualizing an Argument Essay
Learning from Other Writers: Student Essays
“It’s Just Too Easy”
“What’s for Lunch? Fast Food in the Public Schools"
Student Essay with Research
“Should Obscene Art Be Funded by the Government?”
Think like a Critic; Work like an Editor: The Student Writer at Work
Learning from Other Writers: Professional Essays
“Why I Dread Black History Month”
“Torture’s Terrible Toll”
“The Case for Torture Warrants”
Style Note: Emphasis
Argumentation in an Image
Suggestions for Writing
Process Guidelines: Writing Argumentation
Conducting Research
When to Research
The Research Process
Choose a Broad Research Paper Topic
Narrow Your Topic
Understand Your Purpose
Understand the Terms of the Assignment
Use Strategies for Narrowing a Topic
Skim Source Materials
Draft a Preliminary Thesis
Locate Sources
Consider the Kind of Information You Need
Use the Catalog to Locate Books
Use Reference Works
Use Indexes to Locate Periodical Material
Search the Internet
Do Field Research
Compile a Working Bibliography
Evaluate Your Sources
Take Notes
Reconsider Your Preliminary Thesis
Outline
Write Your First Draft
Document Source Material
What to Document
How To Document Source Material
Introducing Source Material
Writing Parenthetical Text Citations
Writing the Works Cited Page*
Using APA Documentation
How to Avoid Plagiarism
Learning from Other Writers: A Student Research Paper
“Genetically Modified Food: Watching What We Eat”
Writing with Sources and Using Proper Documentation
Outlining
Writing Your First Draft
Plagiarism
Being a Responsible Writer
Documenting Source Material
Revising and Editing Your Research Paper
Learning from Other Writers: A Student Research Paper
"Genetically Modified Food: Watching What We Eat"
Assessment: Assembling a Writing Portfolio and Writing Essay Examination Answers
The Writing Portfolio
The Purposes of a Writing Portfolio
How To Assemble Your Portfolio
What to Include in a Self-Reflection Essay
Essay Examination Answers
Process Guidelines: Writing Essay Examination Answers
Strategies for Reducing Anxiety
A Sample Essay Examination Answer
Writing about Literature
How to Read Literature
How to Write about Literature
Learning from Other Writers: A Student Essay with Research
“Symbol and Theme in ‘Coca Cola and Coca Frio’"
A Short Story and Poem for Response
“The Open Window”
“A Gathering of Deafs”
A Guide to Frequently Occurring Errors
Word Choice
Troublesome Phrasings
Phrasings That Announce Your Intent
Unnecessary or Faulty Modifiers
Faulty Synonyms Etc.
Faulty Grammar and Usage
ESL Note: Idioms
Double Negatives (dn)
Frequently Confused Words
Sentence Fragments
Finding Sentence Fragments
Correcting Sentence Fragments
ESL Note: The Past Participe and Passive Voice
Run-On Sentences and Comma Splices
Finding Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices
Correcting Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices
ESL Note: Commas and Main Clauses
Verbs
Verb Forms: Regular and Irregular Verbs
ESL Note: Incorrect Use of -D and -ED Endings
ESL Note: Use of Am with the Present Participle
Irregular Verb Forms
Verb Forms: Be
ESL Note: Use of Has and Have with Been -S and -ES Forms -D and ED Forms
Subject-Verb Agreement
Compound Subjects
Subject and Verb Separated
Inverted Order
Indefinite Pronouns
Collective Nouns
Relative Pronouns
ESL Note: Singular Verbs and Noncount Nouns
Tense Shifts
Voice Shifts
Pronouns
Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement
Compound Subjects
Collective Nouns
Indefinite Pronouns
Gender-Neutral Pronouns
Pronoun Reference
Ambiguous Reference
Unstated Reference
Person Shifts
Reflexive and Intensive Pronouns
Pronoun Case
Pronouns in Compounds
Pronouns after Forms of To Be
Pronouns in Comparisons
Pronouns Followed by Nouns
Who, Whoever, Whom, and Whomever
ESL Note: Pronoun Reference and Who, Whom, Which, or That
Modifiers
Adjectives and Adverbs
Comparative and Superlative Forms of Adjectives and Adverbs
ESL Note: A, An, and The
Dangling Modifiers
Misplaced Modifiers
Punctuation
The Comma
Commas with Items in a Series
Commas with Introductory Elements
Commas to Set Off Nouns of Direct Address
Commas with Nonessential Elements
Commas with Interrupters
Commas with Main Clauses
Commas between Coordinate Modifiers, Commas for Clarity, and Commas to Separate Contrasting Elements
When Not to Use a Comma
The Semicolon
The Colon
The Dash
Parentheses
The Apostrophe
The Apostrophe to Show Possession
The Apostrophe to Indicate Missing Letters or Numbers and for
Some Plurals
ESL Note: Its and It’s
Quotation Marks
The Ellipsis Mark
Brackets
Italics and Underlining
Capitalization, Spelling, Abbreviations, and Numbers
Capitalization
ESL Note: Capitalization
Spelling
ESL Note: Spelling
The Hyphen
Abbreviations and Numbers
Appendix: The Parts of Speech
Revising and Editing Reference Guide
Revising and Editing Symbols
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.


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