9781574443561

Superior Customer Value in the New Economy: Concepts and Cases, Second Edition

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781574443561

  • ISBN10:

    1574443569

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2004-05-27
  • Publisher: CRC Press

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Summary

Great companies consistently meet and exceed customer desires. Superior Customer Value in the New Economy: Concepts and Cases, Second Edition offers a blueprint for responding effectively to customer demands and for creating the benchmarks common to world-class service companies. The Second Edition elaborates on the latest perspectives of the business and academic communities, exploring leading marketing and managing developments in the crucial area of customer value (CV). It delivers expert guidance on designing, implementing, and evaluating a CV strategy that benefits e-service and information-based organizations.Building upon concepts, cases, and in-chapter applications, the book addresses best practices, organizational responsiveness, market orientation, and the planning and strategy issues that result in high rates of customersatisfaction in e-service and information-based organizations. It concludes with 18 detailed, "hands-on" examples of companies attempting to create customer value. Each case study delivers an in-depth look at major CV themes such as responding to change, being customer oriented, customer loyalty, and more. Each of these real-world examples provides excellent learning opportunities to model effective customer value behavior and practices.

Author Biography

Art Weinstein is professor and chair of marketing in the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship at Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Table of Contents

PART I: CUSTOMER VALUE --- THE BUILDING BLOCKS
Customers Want Top Value
3(14)
The Importance of Customer Value
5(3)
What Does Value Really Mean?
5(1)
Service, Quality, Image, and Price: the Essence of Customer Value
6(2)
Customer Value: Marketing Management Implications
8(2)
The Value-Creating Organization
10(1)
Summary
11(1)
Customer Value Action Items
11(1)
Appendix: Analyzing Business Situations -- The Customer Value Funnel Approach
12(3)
The Value Funnel
13(2)
Questions
15(1)
References
16(1)
Being Customer Oriented
17(16)
Customer Commitment: How Market Leaders Do It
18(1)
The Marketing Concept Revisited
19(1)
Selling vs. Market Orientation
19(7)
Developing a Customer-Oriented Organization
23(2)
Creating a Bias for Action
25(1)
Marketing Approaches to Achieve a Customer Focus
26(3)
Summary
29(1)
Customer Value Action Items
30(1)
References
31(2)
Process and Customer Value
33(28)
Introduction
33(22)
Key Organizational Processes
35(6)
Assessing Process Effectiveness
41(2)
Plan
43(1)
Do
44(2)
Check
46(6)
Act
52(3)
Summary
55(1)
Customer Value Action Items
55(2)
References
57(4)
PART II: CREATING VALUE THROUGH SERVICES AND E-COMMERCE
The Service Sector and the New Economy
61(14)
Reshaping the Traditional Economy: the North American Industrial Classification System
63(1)
Service Firms Create Value
64(3)
What Is a Service?
65(2)
The Emergence of the New Economy
67(3)
Keys to Competing Successfully in the New Economy
70(2)
Summary
72(1)
Customer Value Action Items
73(1)
References
73(2)
Defining and Managing Service Quality
75(26)
What Is Quality?
76(5)
Service Quality Guidelines
81(9)
Why Quality Matters
90(4)
How to Improve Quality
94(2)
Summary
96(1)
Customer Value Action Items
97(1)
References
98(3)
Managing e-Service Quality
101(16)
e-Service and Customer Satisfaction: Research Insights
102(3)
e-Service Quality and Customer Loyalty
105(1)
How to Improve e-Service Quality
106(5)
Summary
111(1)
Customer Value Action Items
111(2)
References
113(4)
PART III: PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING A WINNING VALUE PROPOSITION
Defining and Refining the Value Proposition
117(22)
The Value Proposition as Basis for Competitive Strategy
117(1)
Value Disciplines and Market Leadership
118(2)
The Value Proposition: Some Applications and Guidelines
120(1)
Building Your Value Proposition: the S-Q-I-P Approach
121(2)
Developing Unique Value Propositions
123(5)
The Value Proposition: Strategic Implications
128(1)
Summary
129(1)
Customer Value Action Items
130(1)
Appendix: Customer Value Assessment Tool (CVAT™)
131(6)
References
137(1)
Bibliography
137(2)
Communicating Value through Price
139(24)
Introduction
139(1)
Relating Price to Value
140(2)
How Buyers Evaluate Price
142(1)
Strategic Pricing
143(4)
Pricing Methods
147(6)
How to Make Good Pricing Decisions
153(4)
Future Pricing Issues
157(2)
Summary
159(1)
Customer Value Action Items
160(1)
References
161(2)
Strategies for Adding and Promoting Value
163(20)
The USP and Differentiation
163(3)
Three Levels of Positioning
166(2)
How to Add Value to Products
168(4)
Some Additional Value-Added Approaches
171(1)
Implementing a Value-Added Services Program
172(1)
Communicating Value through an IMC Program
173(1)
Creating an IMC Program
174(2)
Summary
176(1)
Customer Value Action Items
177(1)
References
178(5)
PART IV: DELIVERING LONG-TERM SUPERIOR VALUE TO CUSTOMERS
Maximizing Value through Retention Marketing
183(18)
Why Focus on Customer Retention?
184(2)
Customer Value/Retention Model
186(2)
Usage Analysis and Customer Retention
188(5)
Designing a Customer Retention Program
193(2)
Customer Retention Approaches
195(3)
Summary
198(1)
Customer Value Action Items
198(1)
References
199(2)
Creating Value through Customer and Supplier Relationships
201(218)
What Is Relationship Marketing?
203(1)
Traditional vs. Relationship Marketing
204(4)
Building Lasting Customer Relationships
208(6)
Improving Supply Chain Relationships
214(3)
Customer Relationship Management
217(3)
Keys to Practicing Relationship Marketing in the New Economy
220(5)
Summary
225(1)
Customer Value Action Items
226(1)
References
227(6)
PART V: CUSTOMER VALUE CASES: A PRIMER AND QUESTIONS FOR ANALYSIS
Boston Market --- Process Flow Outcomes
233(8)
Delicato Family Winery --- Building and Communicating Value
241(20)
Dow Corning --- Customer Value and Segmentation
261(14)
Edward Jones --- Managing Customer Relationships
275(6)
FedEx Corporation --- A Customer Value Funnel Assessment
281(8)
The Grateful Dead --- Creating Deadheads by Providing Drop-Dead Customer Service
289(8)
Harrah's Entertainment, Inc. --- Loyalty Management
297(8)
``Herding Cats'' across the Supply Chain
305(10)
JetBlue Airways --- Adding Value
315(12)
Lexmark International --- Creating New Market Space
327(8)
Nantucket Nectars --- Perceived Quality
335(12)
Rubbermaid --- Market Orientation
347(10)
Office Depot® Goes Online --- e-Service Quality
357(8)
Pizza Hut® --- A Customer Loyalty Program
365(10)
Publix Super Markets, Inc. --- Achieving Customer Intimacy
375(18)
StatePride Industrial Laundry --- Value Chain Analysis
393(8)
Time Insurance --- A Study of Process Quality Improvement
401(6)
Walgreens --- Customer Orientation
407(12)
Index 419

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