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SuperVision and Instructional Leadership : A Developmental Approach,9780205322022
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SuperVision and Instructional Leadership : A Developmental Approach

by ; ;
ISBN13:

9780205322022

ISBN10:
0205322026
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $87.40
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Summary

This classic market leading text in instructional leadership and supervision continues to challenge the conventional purposes, practices, structure, and language of successful education. This ground breaking book, now in its fifth edition, further challenges and bridges the boundaries of Supervision, Instructional Leadership, Educational Change, and School Success. The change in title to SuperVision and Instructional Leadership signifies the need and reality of viewing school improvement as a whole; accounting for complexity, paradoxes, and shifting reforms. This book once again pushes into new frontiers of thinking and practice. Building on the success of previous editions, the fifth edition now addresses hot issues such as school improvements, constructivist teaching, professional development, Chaos Theory, and state mandated standards. This is a resource that students purchase, use in class, and reference throughout their careers as education leaders.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART I Introduction 1(16)
SuperVision for Successful Schools
3(14)
SuperVision: A New Name for a New Paradigm
6(2)
Supervisory Glue as a Metaphor for Success
8(1)
Who Is Responsible for SuperVision?
9(2)
Organization of This Book
11(2)
The Agony of Thought and Feeling
13(1)
Exercises
13(1)
References
14(1)
Suggested Readings
15(2)
PART II Knowledge 17(202)
The Norm: Why Schools Are as They Are
19(127)
The Work Environment or Culture of Schools
19(1)
The Legacy of the One-Room Schoolhouse
20(10)
Blaming the Victim and Structural Strain
30(2)
To Qualify, Summarize, and Propose
32(1)
Exercises
33(2)
References
35(1)
Suggested Readings
36(110)
Directive Control Behaviors
146(12)
Directive Control Behaviors with Individuals
147(3)
Directive Control Behaviors with Groups
150(1)
A History of Overreliance on Control
151(1)
Issues in Directive Control
152(2)
When to Use Directive Control Behaviors
154(1)
Moving from Directive Control toward Directive Informational Behaviors
154(1)
Summary
155(1)
Exercises
155(2)
References
157(1)
Suggested Readings
157(1)
Directive Informational Behaviors
158(11)
Directive Informational Behaviors with Individuals
159(3)
Directive Informational Behaviors with Groups
162(1)
Comparing Directive Control and Directive Informational Statements
163(2)
Issues in the Directive Informational Approach
165(1)
When to Use Directive Informational Behaviors
165(1)
Moving from Directive Informational toward Collaborative Behaviors
166(1)
Summary
166(1)
Exercises
167(1)
References
168(1)
Suggested Readings
168(1)
Collaborative Behaviors
169(13)
Collaborative Behaviors with Individuals
170(4)
Collaborative Behaviors with Groups
174(2)
Issues in Collaborative Supervision
176(2)
When to Use Collaborative Behaviors
178(1)
Moving from Collaborative toward Nondirective Behaviors
178(1)
Collaboration and Cooperation
179(1)
Summary
179(1)
Exercises
179(2)
References
181(1)
Suggested Readings
181(1)
Nondirective Behaviors
182(15)
Nondirective Behaviors with Individuals
183(5)
Nondirective Behaviors with Groups
188(1)
Initiating Nondirective Supervision
189(1)
Nondirective, Not Laissez Faire, Supervision
190(1)
Issues with Nondirective Supervision
191(1)
When to Use Nondirective Behaviors
192(1)
Nondirective Supervision, Teacher Collaboration
193(1)
Summary
194(1)
Exercises
194(2)
References
196(1)
Suggested Readings
196(1)
Developmental Supervision: Theory and Practice
197(22)
Rationale for Developmental Supervision
197(7)
Applying Developmental Supervision
204(7)
Not Algorithms, But Guideposts for Decisions
211(1)
Summary
211(1)
Exercises
212(1)
References
213(2)
Suggested Readings
215(1)
Part III Conclusion
216(3)
PART IV Technical Skills 219(94)
Assessing and Planning Skills
221(29)
Personal Plans
222(1)
Assessing Time
222(3)
Changing Time Allocations: Planning
225(2)
Assessing and Planning within the Organization
227(1)
Ways of Assessing Needs
228(3)
Analyzing Organizational Needs
231(6)
Planning
237(6)
Models Combining Assessment and Planning
243(1)
Strategic Planning
244(2)
Planning: To What Extent?
246(1)
Summary
246(1)
Exercises
247(1)
References
248(1)
Suggested Readings
249(1)
Observing Skills
250(26)
Formative Observation Instruments Are Not Summative Evaluation Instruments
252(1)
Ways of Describing
253(1)
Quantitative Observations
254(7)
Quantitative and Qualitative Instruments
261(1)
Qualitative Observations
262(7)
Tailored Observation Systems
269(3)
Types and Purposes of Observation
272(1)
Further Cautions When Using Observations
273(1)
Summary
273(1)
Exercises
274(1)
References
275(1)
Suggested Readings
275(1)
Research and Evaluation Skills
276(37)
Alternative Approaches to Research and Evaluation
277(5)
Judgments
282(1)
Evaluating Specific Instructional Programs
282(2)
Key Decisions in the Evaluation Process
284(2)
Evidence of Program Outcomes
286(1)
Multiple Sources and Methods
287(2)
Overall Instructional Program Evaluation
289(4)
Other Considerations for Program Evaluation
293(6)
Teacher Evaluation
299(6)
Summary
305(1)
Exercises
306(1)
References
307(2)
Suggested Readings
309(1)
Part IV Conclusion
310(3)
PART V Tasks of SuperVision 313(132)
Direct Assistance to Teachers
315(19)
Clinical Supervision
315(5)
Comparing Clinical Supervision with Teacher Evaluation
320(1)
Integrating Clinical Supervision and Developmental Supervision
320(1)
Peer Coaching
321(5)
Other Forms of Direct Assistance
326(1)
Establishing Procedures for Direct Assistance
327(2)
Developmental Considerations in Direct Assistance
329(1)
Summary
330(1)
Exercises
330(1)
References
331(2)
Suggested Readings
333(1)
Group Development
334(25)
Dimensions of an Effective Group
335(1)
Group Member Roles
336(4)
Changing Group Leadership Style
340(2)
Dealing with Dysfunctional Members
342(2)
Resolving Conflict
344(4)
Preparing for Group Meetings
348(2)
Procedures for Large-Group Involvement
350(5)
Summary
355(1)
Exercises
355(2)
References
357(1)
Suggested Readings
357(2)
Professional Development
359(32)
Why the Need for Professional Development?
360(1)
Characteristics of Successful Professional Development Programs
361(2)
Individual Teacher-Based Professional Development
363(2)
Alternative Professional Development Formats
365(1)
Examples of Effective Professional Development Programs
366(7)
Stages of Professional Development
373(1)
Matching Professional Development to Teacher Characteristics
374(8)
The Nuts and Bolts
382(1)
Teachers as Objects or Agents in Professional Development
383(3)
Summary
386(1)
Exercises
386(2)
Endnote
388(1)
References
388(2)
Suggested Readings
390(1)
Curriculum Development
391(28)
Sources of Curriculum Development
392(1)
Teacher-Proof Curriculum
393(3)
What Should Be the Purpose of the Curriculum?
396(1)
What Should Be the Content of the Curriculum?
397(1)
How Should the Curriculum Be Organized?
398(2)
In What Format Should the Curriculum Be Written?
400(4)
Curriculum Format as Reflective of Choice Given to Teachers
404(1)
Relationship of Curriculum Purpose, Content, Organization, and Format
405(1)
Levels of Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development
406(2)
Integrating Curriculum Format with Developers and Levels of Development
408(1)
Matching Curriculum Development with Teacher Development
409(3)
Curriculum Development as a Vehicle for Enhancing Collective Thinking about Instruction
412(2)
Summary
414(1)
Exercises
414(2)
References
416(2)
Suggested Readings
418(1)
Action Research: The School as the Center of Inquiry
419(26)
Action Research: The Concept
420(1)
How Is Action Research Conducted?
420(1)
A Developmental Approach to Action Research
421(1)
Decisions about Action Research
422(3)
Action Research: Vehicle for a Cause beyond Oneself
425(1)
Examples of Action Research
426(5)
Action Research Leagues
431(1)
Shared Governance for Action Research
432(4)
Personal Examples of School-Based Action Research Plans
436(3)
Conclusion: Focus, Structure, and Time for Development
439(1)
Exercises
439(2)
References
441(1)
Suggested Readings
442(1)
Part V Conclusion
443(2)
PART VI Function of SuperVision 445(28)
SuperVision, Change, and School Success
447(16)
Assumptions about Change
447(2)
Change from the Teacher's View
449(1)
Chaos Theory and Change
450(2)
Chaos Theory Applied to School Change
452(2)
Implications of Chaos Theory at the Classroom Level
454(2)
Creating a Culture for Change
456(1)
Changing the Conditions of Teaching
457(1)
The Role of SuperVision and Supervisor in School Improvement
458(1)
What Is School Success?
459(1)
Exercises
460(1)
References
461(1)
Suggested Readings
462(1)
SuperVision for Democratic Education: Returning to Our Core
463(10)
Systemic Reform around Purpose
466(2)
Support for Hard and Unglamorous Work
468(1)
Why Systemic Reform as Locally Derived?
469(2)
Conclusion
471(1)
References
471(1)
Suggested Readings
472(1)
Appendix A: What Is Your Educational Philosophy? 473(5)
Appendix B: Skill Practices Using Directive Control, Directive Informational, Collaborative, and Nondirective Approaches 478(6)
Appendix C: Assessing School-Based Supervisory Practices for Promoting Instructional Imporvement 484(3)
Name Index 487(5)
Subject Index 492


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