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Supply Chain Management : From Vision to Implementation,9780131015043
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Supply Chain Management : From Vision to Implementation

by ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780131015043

ISBN10:
0131015044
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/16/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $184.40

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Summary

For undergraduate or MBA courses in Supply Chain Management. This text takes a strategic, managerial, and cross-functional view of supply chain management, enabling managers to participate in the vision and implementation of world-class supply chain networks. To achieve this, the book introduces a Supply Chain Roadmap process model as a guiding framework for designing and implementing integrated supply chains. Students gain the knowledge and analytical tools to perform analysis and act as change agents within their organizations.

Author Biography

Stanley E Fawcett is the Donald L. Staheli Professor of Global Supply Chain Management in the Marriott School at Brigham Young University. Stan earned his undergraduate, MBA, and MA in International Studies from Brigham Young University before obtaining his doctorate at Arizona State University. He began his academic life at Michigan State University before joining the faculty at the Marriott School.

  

Lisa M. Ellram , Ph.D., CPA (MN), C.P.M., C.M.A., Ph.D., Business Administration (Logistics) with a minor in Industrial Engineering, and M.S., Logistics, The Ohio State University; M.B.A., and B.S.B. in Accounting (with high distinction) University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.  She is Chairperson of the Department of Management and the Richard and Lorie Allen Professor of Business at Colorado State University.  Prior to that, she was The John and Barbara Bebbling Professor of Business at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business.  She was named as a “purchasing practitioner to know” by Supply and Demand Chain Executive, 2004.  She was also named as a Dean’s Council of 100 Distinguished Scholar at ASU in 2001.

 

Jeffrey A. Ogden earned his Ph.D. and M.B.A. in Supply Chain Management from Arizona State University and a B.S. in Accounting from Weber State University.  He is currently an Assistant Supply Chain Management Professor in the Business Management Department in the Marriott School of Management at Brigham Young University.

 

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
Acknowledgments xxi
About the Authors xxiii
PART I: THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF SUPPLY CHAIN STRATEGY
1(180)
Supply Chain Management and Competitive Strategy
3(25)
The Theory of Supply Chain Management
6(5)
Supply Chain Management Defined
8(1)
The Internal Value Chain
8(2)
The Bullwhip Effect
10(1)
Supply Chain Management in Practice
11(2)
Integrating Supply Chain Thinking into Corporate Strategy
13(8)
The Essence and Evolution of Strategic Management
13(1)
The Four Decision Areas of Strategy
14(2)
The Influence of SC Thinking on Strategy
16(3)
A Look Ahead: A Process Road Map for Strategic SCM
19(2)
Conclusion
21(7)
Summary of Key Points
22(1)
Review Exercises
22(1)
Case: SCM---Latest Fad or Strategic Imperative?
23(1)
Endnotes
24(1)
Supplement A: The Beer Game
25(3)
Customer Fulfillment Strategies
28(38)
The Information-Empowered Customer
31(1)
Creating Value to Meet Customers' Needs
32(4)
Quality
32(1)
Cost
33(1)
Flexibility
33(1)
Delivery
34(1)
Innovation
35(1)
Trade-Offs Versus Synergies
35(1)
Understanding Satisfaction to Fulfill Customers' Needs
36(6)
Customer Service Strategies
39(1)
Customer Satisfaction Strategies
39(1)
Customer Success Strategies
40(1)
The End Customer
41(1)
Implementing a Customer-Centric Fulfillment Strategy
42(7)
Matching Fulfillment Strategies to Customer Needs
42(2)
Defining Relationship Intensity
44(2)
Evaluating the Profitability of Customer Relationships
46(1)
Using Customer Relationship Management Systems
46(2)
Recognizing Barriers to Effective Customer Fulfillment
48(1)
Conclusion
49(17)
Summary of Key Points
50(1)
Review Exercises
50(1)
Case: SCM2
51(1)
Endnotes
52(1)
Supplement B: Productivity and Quality Management
53(13)
Process Thinking: SCM's Foundation
66(34)
A Need for Process Management
69(1)
Functional Organization and Its Consequences
70(2)
The Anatomy of a Process
72(2)
Systems Thinking and Process Management
74(6)
A Holistic View
75(1)
Information Availability and Accuracy
75(1)
Cross-Functional and Interorganizational Teamwork
76(1)
Measurement
76(1)
Systems Analysis
77(2)
Systems Thinking at Work
79(1)
A Process View of the Company
80(8)
The Strategic Linkage
81(3)
Resource Management
84(3)
Boundary-Spanning Mechanisms
87(1)
Process Reengineering
88(4)
Identify Desired Outcomes
88(1)
Make the Process Visible
89(1)
Reorganize the Process
89(1)
Assign Responsibility for Work
89(1)
Leverage Technology
89(2)
Reimagine Systematically
91(1)
Conclusion
92(8)
Summary of Key Points
92(1)
Review Exercises
92(1)
Case: Global Semiconductor's Market Share Slide
93(1)
Endnotes
94(1)
Supplement C: Decision Making Under Uncertainty
95(5)
The New Product Development Process: Managing the Idea Infrastructure
100(31)
Introduction
103(1)
Mitigating Risk in New Product Development
104(4)
Formalized Risk Management
105(1)
Early Involvement of Critical Supply Chain Players
106(1)
Core Competencies
107(1)
``Design for'' Considerations
107(1)
Modular Versus Integral Product Design
108(1)
Marketing and the Criticality of the Customer
108(3)
Customer-Driven Marketing and the Importance of the Product
109(1)
Harley-Davidson and Its Supply Chain
109(1)
Product Positioning
110(1)
Pricing to Meet Consumer Demand
111(1)
New Product Development
111(7)
Target Price, Profit, and Cost in NPD
112(3)
Target Cost Breakdown and the NPD Team
115(1)
Cost Management Activities During NPD
116(1)
New Product Launch
117(1)
The Role of Finance in New Product Development
118(6)
The Boundary-Spanning Role of Finance at Intel
118(1)
Measures of Profit
119(2)
Cash Flow
121(2)
Economic Value-Added
123(1)
Conclusion
124(7)
Summary of Key Points
125(1)
Review Exercises
125(1)
Case: Reorganizing for New Product Development and Ongoing Customer Management
126(1)
Endnotes
127(1)
Supplement D: Evaluating the Return on a New Product Project
127(4)
The Order Fulfillment Process: Managing the Physical Flow Infrastructure
131(50)
Functional Components of the Physical Flow
134(2)
Acquiring the Goods: The Nature of Purchasing Management
136(7)
The Purchasing Process
138(4)
Purchasing Skills for a Supply Chain World
142(1)
Producing the Goods: The Nature of Production Management
143(9)
The Production Process
144(2)
Toyota's Quest for Lean Production
146(3)
Operations Management in the Services Setting
149(3)
Operations Skills for a Supply Chain World
152(1)
Delivering the Goods: The Nature of Logistics Management
152(9)
The Logistical Process
153(7)
Logistics Skills for a Supply Chain World
160(1)
Conclusion
161(20)
Summary of Key Points
162(1)
Review Exercises
162(1)
Case: The Club War
162(2)
Endnotes
164(1)
Supplement E: Forecasting and Inventory Management
164(13)
Part I Epilogue
177(4)
PART II: DESIGNING THE GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN
181(158)
Scanning and Global Supply Chain Design
184(29)
Why Supply Chain Management Now?
187(1)
The Journey from Ownership to Relationship Integration
188(2)
The Decline of Ownership Integration
188(1)
The Rise of Relationship Integration
189(1)
A Changing Supply Chain World
190(6)
Environmental Scanning
190(3)
Forces Shaping Today's Supply Chain Environment
193(3)
The Globalization of Markets
196(9)
Forces Driving Globalization
196(1)
Globalization's Implications
197(4)
Globalization's Rules
201(2)
Designing a Global Network
203(2)
Conclusion
205(8)
Summary of Key Points
205(1)
Review Exercises
206(1)
Case: The Scanning and Planning Internship
206(1)
Endnotes
207(1)
Supplement F: Facility Location
208(5)
Supply Chain Mapping
213(32)
Introduction
216(1)
The Importance of Supply Chain Design
216(2)
Nokia
217(1)
Process Mapping
218(2)
Process Analysis
220(2)
Value Stream Mapping
221(1)
Supply Chain Design
222(7)
Design for Supply Chain Initiatives
224(1)
Approaches to Supply Chain Design
224(5)
Supply Chain Mapping Approaches
229(3)
Conclusion
232(13)
Summary of Key Points
233(1)
Review Exercises
233(1)
Case: Mapping the Mac
234(1)
Endnotes
235(1)
Supplement G: Project Management
236(9)
Strategic Supply Chain Cost Management
245(31)
The Profit Leverage Effect of Supply Chain Cost Reduction
248(1)
Strategic Cost Management Principles
249(4)
Supply Chain Analysis
249(1)
Value Proposition Analysis
250(1)
Cost Driver Analysis
251(1)
Example of Strategic Cost Management: Southwest Airlines
252(1)
Responsibility for Strategic Cost Management
253(1)
Industry Examples
253(1)
Determining the Tools to Support Strategic Cost Management
254(5)
Classification of Supply Chain Decisions
254(2)
Classification of Decisions: Analyzing the Quadrants
256(2)
Commodity Classification
258(1)
Activity-Based Cost Management
259(4)
Problems with Traditional Managerial Accounting Systems
259(2)
The ABCM Solution
261(1)
Making Better Decisions
262(1)
Problems with ABCM Implementation
262(1)
Total Cost of Ownership
263(9)
Step 1: Determine Desired Benefits of TCO
264(1)
Step 2: Form a Team to Work on TCO Analysis
265(1)
Step 3: Identify Relevant Costs and Gather Data
266(4)
Step 4: Fine-Tune the TCO Analysis, Including Sensitivity Analysis
270(1)
Step 5: Present Recommendations to Top Management
270(1)
Additional Examples of TCO Analysis
271(1)
Conclusion
272(4)
Summary of Key Points
272(1)
Review Exercises
273(1)
Case: The Costly Packaging Decision
273(2)
Endnotes
275(1)
Core Competencies and Outsourcing
276(28)
What Is a Core Competence?
279(3)
The Outsourcing Challenge
282(18)
Benefits of Outsourcing
283(2)
Constraints and Risks of Outsourcing
285(1)
Establish the Outsourcing Team and Goals
286(13)
Skill Level Required for Buyers
299(1)
Bringing Activities or Processes In-house
300(1)
Conclusion
300(4)
Summary of Key Points
301(1)
Review Exercises
301(1)
Case: Outsourcing for the First Time
302(1)
Endnotes
302(2)
Supply Chain Rationalization and Role Shifting
304(35)
The Challenge of Complexity
307(2)
Sources of Complexity
309(10)
Organizational Structure
310(1)
Value-Added Processes
311(1)
The Operating Network
312(2)
The Company's SKUs
314(2)
The Supply Base
316(1)
The Customer Base
316(1)
The Logistics System
317(2)
SC Rationalization: The Case of Supply-Base Optimization
319(7)
How Many Suppliers Do You Need?
319(2)
The Supply-Base Optimization Process
321(5)
Shifting Roles Among SC Members
326(4)
Second-Tier Sourcing Contracts
328(1)
Supplier Certification
328(1)
Vendor-Managed Replenishment
329(1)
Supplier-Integrated Manufacturing
330(1)
Conclusion
330(9)
Summary of Key Points
330(1)
Review Exercises
331(1)
Case: Designing a Hybrid Global Sourcing Strategy
331(2)
Endnotes
333(2)
Part II Epilogue
335(4)
PART III: COLLABORATING ACROSS THE SUPPLY CHAIN
339(157)
Relationship Management
342(31)
Supply Chain Relationships
345(1)
The Relationship Continuum
346(3)
Managing Transactional Relationships
349(2)
Managing Strategic Alliances for Success
351(6)
A Model for Alliance Management
352(2)
Practices That Support Synergistic Alliances
354(2)
Attitudes and Behaviors That Impede Alliance Development
356(1)
The Role of Trust and Power in Supply Chain Relationships
357(4)
Trust Is Two Sided
357(1)
Trust Is Behavior
357(1)
Trust Requires Open Information Sharing
358(1)
Trust Is Personal
358(1)
Trust Means Performance
359(1)
Assessing Supply Chain Trust
359(2)
Modern Negotiation and Relationship Management
361(7)
What Is Negotiation?
361(1)
When Is Negotiation Appropriate?
362(1)
Negotiation Philosophies
362(1)
Preparing for a Successful Negotiation
363(4)
Conducting Successful Negotiations
367(1)
Becoming a Skillful Negotiator
368(1)
Conclusion
368(5)
Summary of Key Points
369(1)
Review Exercises
370(1)
Case: How Close Is Too Close?
370(1)
Endnotes
371(2)
Information Sharing
373(32)
The Importance of Information
376(2)
Achieving Connectivity Through Information Technology
378(2)
Brief History of Information System Connectivity
378(2)
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems
380(11)
ERP Implementation Issues
382(2)
The Future: ERP II?
384(1)
E-Commerce and the Internet
385(2)
E-Marketplaces
387(1)
Radio Frequency Technology
387(2)
Electronic On-Line Bidding Events: The Reverse Auction
389(1)
Information Technology Summary
390(1)
Achieving Information Sharing Through Willingness
391(6)
Why Should Information Be Shared?
391(1)
What Information Should Be Shared?
391(2)
When Should Information Be Shared?
393(1)
Who Should Be Sharing the Information?
393(1)
Challenges to Open Information Sharing
394(3)
The Information Irony
397(2)
What Does the Future Hold?
399(2)
Conclusion
401(4)
Summary of Key Points
401(1)
Review Exercises
402(1)
Case: Supply-Base Reduction at Transport
402(1)
Endnotes
403(2)
Performance Measurement
405(28)
The Role of Performance Measurement
408(2)
Traditional Measurement
410(5)
Asset Management
411(1)
Cost
412(1)
Customer Service
412(1)
Productivity
413(1)
Quality
414(1)
Caveats Regarding Traditional Measurement Practice
415(1)
Supply Chain Measurement
415(10)
Alignment
416(1)
Customer Satisfaction
417(1)
Process Costing
418(2)
Supply Chain Measures
420(3)
Scorecards
423(1)
Customized Measures
424(1)
Benchmarking
425(2)
Conclusion
427(6)
Summary of Key Points
429(1)
Review Exercises
429(1)
Case: The Gorilla's Dilemma
430(1)
Endnotes
431(2)
People Management: Bridge or Barrier to SCM
433(31)
The Supply Chain Manager
436(1)
The Most Valuable Asset?
437(3)
Investing in Employee Capabilities
440(10)
The Cross-Trained Worker
441(2)
The Cross-Experienced Manager
443(2)
Cross-Functional Teams
445(5)
Establishing an Empowerment Culture
450(7)
Empowerment at Newmont Gold
451(2)
The ``ABCs'' of an Empowerment Culture
453(4)
Integrating People and Technology Systems
457(1)
Conclusion
458(6)
Summary of Key Points
459(1)
Review Exercises
460(1)
Case: Collaboration's Missing Link
460(2)
Endnotes
462(2)
Collaborative Innovation
464(32)
The Dynamics of Success
467(3)
The Perils of Complacency
468(1)
The Learning Organization
469(1)
Innovation Strategies
470(9)
Transformational Innovation
470(2)
Incremental Innovation
472(1)
Pet Projects at Newmont Gold
473(2)
FrameworkS at Johnson & Johnson
475(3)
Employee Initiative and Innovation at 3M
478(1)
Collaborative Innovation Initiatives
479(6)
Collaborative Improvement Suggestion Programs
480(1)
Collaborative Training
481(1)
Collaborative Problem Solving
482(1)
Collaborative Pilot Projects
482(1)
Collaborative Process Improvement
483(2)
Organizing for Long-Term Collaboration
485(2)
Executive Governance Councils
485(2)
Supply Chain Advisory Councils
487(1)
Conclusion
487(9)
Summary of Key Points
488(1)
Review Exercises
489(1)
Case: The Case for Supply Chain Advisory Boards
489(1)
Endnotes
490(3)
Part III Epilogue
493(3)
Appendix A
496(19)
Case 1: Creating a Cycle of Satisfaction
500(2)
Case 2: Getting the Data Right
502(2)
Case 3: Supplier Quality at Triton Diamond
504(3)
Case 4: Quality Upstream at HI-TECH Semiconductor
507(2)
Case 5: Quality Issue/Consequential Damages
509(1)
Case 6: Chatham, Ltd., Market Analysis
510(1)
Case 7: Evaluating a Leader's Strategy for Managing Procurement Leverage
511(2)
Case 8: A Mandate for Costs Reduction Due to the Competitive Environment
513(2)
Glossary 515(5)
Index 520


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