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Symbolic Interactionism : An Introduction, an Interpretation, an Integration

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780130259721

ISBN10:
0130259721
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

For sophomore/junior-level courses in Social Psychology or Social Theory in departments of Sociology; and for Senior seminar courses that examine the symbolic interactionist perspective. Using a unique step-by-step, integrated approach, this text organizes the basic concepts of symbolic interactionism in such a way that students understand them clearly and are able to apply them to their own lives. It emphasizes the active side of human beingshumans as definers and users of the environment, humans as problem solvers and in control of their own actionsand it shows students how society makes us, and how we in turn shape society. Each chapter examines a single concept, but relates that concept to the whole perspective and to other concepts in the perspective.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
The Nature of Perspective
1(12)
New Perspective Mean New Realities
6(2)
Perspectives Are Socially Created
8(1)
Is There a Best Perspective?
9(1)
Summary
10(1)
Some Examples of Perspectives: Informal and Formal Perspectives
10(2)
References
12(1)
The Perspective of Social Science
13(14)
Social Science As a Perspective
15(10)
Sociology As a Perspective
17(2)
Psychology As a Perspective
19(1)
Commonalities and Differences between Sociology and Psychology
20(1)
The Perspective of Social Psychology in Psychology
21(2)
The Perspective of Social Psychology in Sociology
23(2)
Summary
25(1)
References
26(1)
Symbolic Interactionism As a Perspective
27(14)
Introduction: Five Central Ideas
27(1)
General Historical Background of Symbolic Interactionism
28(5)
Mead and Pragmatism
29(2)
Mead and Darwin
31(2)
Mead and Behaviorism
33(1)
A Contrast With Other Perspectives: Warriner
33(2)
Shibutani: References Groups As Perspectives
35(2)
Attitudes Versus Perspectives
37(2)
Summary
39(1)
References
40(1)
The Meaning of the Symbol
41(19)
The Nature of Reality
42(2)
Importance of a Social Defined Reality
43(1)
Objects As ``Social Objects''
44(2)
Symbols---A Class of Social Objects
46(1)
Symbols Are Social, Meaningful, and Significant
47(4)
Language
51(2)
Words As Categories
52(1)
Symbols, Perspectives, and Interaction
53(1)
Humans and ``Infrahumans''
54(3)
How Animals Approach Environment
55(1)
Symbols versus Signs
56(1)
Summary
57(1)
References
58(2)
The Importance of the Symbol
60(12)
Symbols and Social Reality
60(1)
Symbols and Human Social Life
61(3)
Symbols and the Individual
64(5)
Naming, Memory, Categorizing
64(1)
Perception
65(1)
Thinking
65(1)
Deliberation and Problem Solving
66(1)
Transcendence of Space and Time
66(1)
Transcendence of One's Own Person
67(1)
Abstract Reality
67(1)
Creativity
68(1)
Self-Direction
69(1)
The Importance of Symbols: A Summary
69(2)
References
71(1)
The Nature of the Self
72(25)
Self As a Social Object
72(2)
Self As Social: Four Social Stages of Self-Development
74(4)
The Preparatory Stage
75(1)
The Play Stage
75(1)
The Game Stage
76(1)
The Reference Group Stage
77(1)
Selves as Ever-Changing Social Objects
78(1)
Self As Object
79(11)
Action Toward Self: Self-Communication
80(1)
Action Toward Self: Self-Perception
81(1)
Self-Perception: Assessment of Our Own Action
81(1)
Self-Perception: The Development of Self-Concept
82(1)
Self-Perception: Self-Judgment, One Aspect of Self-Concept
82(4)
Self-Perception: Identity, One Aspect of Self-Concept
86(2)
Action Toward Self: Self-Control
88(2)
Central Ideas About the Self
90(1)
The Self and the Symbolic Interactionist Perspective
91(1)
The ``I'' and the ``Me''
92(2)
Summary
94(1)
References
94(3)
The Human Mind
97(12)
The Meaning of Mind: Symbolic Interaction Toward Self
97(2)
Mind Action: Making Indications Toward Self
99(1)
Mind Action: The Ability to Control Overt Action
100(2)
Mind Action: The Ability to Problem Solve
102(2)
Mind Action Is Part of All Social Interaction
104(2)
Summary
106(1)
References
107(2)
Taking the Role of the Other
109(15)
Description of the Concept
109(2)
Role Taking's Relationship to Self, Mind, and Symbols
111(3)
Self
112(1)
Mind
112(1)
Symbols
113(1)
Role Taking
113(1)
The Importance of Role Taking
114(5)
Its Central Place in All Social Interaction
114(1)
Nine Ways Role Taking Is Central to All Human Life
115(4)
And If We Don't Role Take---So What?
119(1)
Summary
120(2)
References
122(2)
Human Action
124(25)
The ``Stream of Action''
124(2)
The Act
126(2)
Action, Goals, and Social Objects
128(2)
Mead's Four Stages of the Act
130(3)
Impulse
130(1)
Perception
131(1)
Manipulation
131(1)
Consummation
132(1)
A Brief Look at the Four Stages
132(1)
Locating the ``Cause'' of Human Action
133(3)
The Definition of the Situation
136(1)
Habitual Action
137(1)
The Role of the Past in Human Action
138(1)
The Role of the Future in Human Action
139(1)
Action and Motives
140(2)
Action and Emotions
142(3)
Action and Choice
145(1)
Summary
145(1)
References
146(3)
Social Interaction
149(19)
Social Action
149(1)
The Meaning of Social Interaction
150(3)
Mutual Social Action
150(1)
Social Interaction Is Symbolic
151(2)
Social Interaction Involves Role Taking
153(1)
The General Importance of Social Interaction
153(12)
Social Interaction Forms Our Basic Human Qualities
154(1)
Social Interaction Is an Important Cause of Human Action
155(5)
Social Interaction Shapes Identities
160(1)
We Label One Another in Social Interaction
160(1)
We Attempt to Shape Identities in Social Interaction
161(3)
We Shape Our Own Identities in Social Interaction
164(1)
Social Interaction Creates Society
165(1)
Summary
165(1)
References
166(2)
Society
168(19)
Groups, Organizations, Social Worlds, and Societies
169(10)
Society Is Symbolic Interaction
170(1)
Society Is Symbolic Interaction That Is Characterized by Cooperative Action
171(4)
Society Is Social Interaction That Is Symbolic, That Is Characterized by Cooperation, and That Develops Culture
175(1)
Culture Is a Shared Perspective
175(1)
Culture Is a Generalized Other
175(1)
Culture Maintains Society
176(2)
Culture Is Ever Changing
178(1)
The Individual Exists Within Many Societies
179(3)
The Active Human Being in Society
182(2)
Summary
184(1)
References
185(2)
Erving Goffman
187(15)
Spencer Cahill
Goffman and Symbolic Interactionism
187(1)
Drama in Interaction
188(4)
Impressions and Performance
188(2)
Performance Teams
190(1)
Reaction to Goffman's Dramaturgical View
191(1)
The Self of Social Interaction
192(3)
Goffman's View of Self
192(1)
Social Control and Self
192(3)
Rituals of Interaction
195(3)
The Meaning of Ritual
195(1)
The Importance of Ritual
196(2)
The Environments of Social Interaction
198(2)
Summary
200(1)
References
201(1)
Symbolic Interactionism: A Final Assessment
202(29)
Symbolic Interactionism and Human Freedom: A Review
203(3)
Symbolic Interactionism and Science
206(3)
Symbolic Interactionism: Some Representative Studies
209(7)
A Study of Pregnant Drug Users
209(2)
A Study of Sam's Definition of Pain and Injury
211(1)
A Study of Identity Formation in a Maximum Security Prison
212(1)
A Study of Orthodox Synagogue Life
213(2)
A Study of Little League Baseball
215(1)
A Study of Bachelorhood and Conversion
215(1)
Symbolic Interactionism: Some Examples of Application
216(11)
An Understanding of Society
218(1)
An Understanding of Racism in Society
218(3)
An Understanding of Gender Differences
221(1)
An Understanding of Dating, Marriage, and Family
222(1)
An Understanding of Childhood Socialization
223(2)
Symbolic Interactionism: A View of the College Experience
225(1)
Symbolic Interactionism: A Final Look at Application
226(1)
The Importance of the Symbolic Interactionist Perspective
227(2)
Summary
229(1)
References
230(1)
Index 231


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