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Taking Sides: Clashing Views in United States History, Volume 1: The Colonial Period to Reconstruction,9780073527239

Taking Sides: Clashing Views in United States History, Volume 1: The Colonial Period to Reconstruction

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Edition:
12th
ISBN13:

9780073527239

ISBN10:
0073527238
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/20/2006
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill/Dushkin
List Price: $46.91

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Summary

This Twelfth Edition of TAKING SIDES: CLASHING VIEWS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, VOLUME 1 presents current controversial issues in a debate-style format designed to stimulate student interest and develop critical thinking skills. Each issue is thoughtfully framed with an issue summary, an issue introduction, and a postscript. An instructor's manual with testing material is available for each volume. USING TAKING SIDES IN THE CLASSROOM is also an excellent instructor resource with practical suggestions on incorporating this effective approach in the classroom. Each TAKING SIDES reader features an annotated listing of selected World Wide Web sites and is supported by our student website, www.mhcls.com/online.

Table of Contents

Preface v
Introduction xvi
PART 1 COLONIAL SOCIETY
1(112)
Is History True?
2(21)
Yes: Oscar Handlin, from Truth in History (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1979)
4(8)
No: William H. McNeill, from ``Mythistory, or Truth, Myth, History, and Historians,'' The American Historical Review (February 1986)
12(11)
Was Disease the Key Factor in the Depopulation of Native Americans in the Americas?
23(20)
Yes: Colin G. Calloway, from New Worlds for All: Indians, Europeans, and the Remarking of Early America (The John Hopkins University Press, 1997)
25(8)
No: David S. Jones, from ``Virgin Soils Revisited,'' William and Mary Quarterly (October 2003)
33(10)
Was Colonial Culture Uniquely American?
43(21)
Yes: Gary B. Nash, from Jack Greene and J.R. Pole, eds., Colonial British America: Essays in the New History of the Early Modern Era (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984)
45(7)
No: David Hackett Fischer, from Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (Oxford University Press, 1989)
52(12)
Were the First Colonists in the Chesapeake Region Ignorant, Lazy, and Unambitious?
64(25)
Yes: Edmund S. Morgan, from American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (W.W. Norton, 1975)
66(9)
No: Russell R. Menard, from ``From Servant to Freeholder: Status Mobility and Property Accumulation in Seventeenth-Century Maryland,'' William and Mary Quarterly (January 1973)
75(14)
Did Colonial New England Women Enjoy Significant Economic Autonomy?
89(24)
Yes: Gloria L. Main, from ``Gender, Work, and Wages in Colonial New England,'' The William and Mary Quarterly (January 1994)
91(9)
No: Lyle Koehler, from A Search for Power: The ``Weaker Sex'' in Seventeenth-Century New England (University of Illinois Press, 1980)
100(13)
PART 2 REVOLUTION AND THE NEW NATION
113(144)
Did the American Revolution Produce a Christian Nation?
114(22)
Yes: Nathan O. Hatch, from ``The Democratization of Christianity and the Character of American Politics,'' in Mark A. Noll, ed., Religion and American Politics (Oxford University Press, 1990)
116(10)
No: Jon Butler, from ``Why Revolutionary America Wasn't a `Christian Nation','' in James H. Hutson, ed., Religion and the New Republic: Faith in the Founding of America (Rowman and Littlefield, 2000)
126(10)
Were the Founding Fathers Democratic Reformers?
136(27)
Yes: John P. Roche, from ``The Founding Fathers: A Reform Caucus in Action,'' American Political Science Review (December 1961)
138(12)
No: Howard Zinn, from A People's History of the United States (Harper Collins, 1999)
150(13)
Was Thomas Jefferson a Political Compromiser?
163(24)
Yes: Morton Borden, from America's Eleven Greatest Presidents, 2d ed. (Rand McNally, 1971)
165(8)
No: Forrest McDonald, from The Presidency of Thomas Jefferson (The University Press of Kansas, 1976)
173(14)
Was James Madison an Effective Wartime President?
187(22)
Yes: Irving Brant, from James Madison: Commander in Chief, 1812--1836 (Bobbs-Merrill, 1961)
189(9)
No: Donald R. Hickey, from The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict (University of Illinois Press, 1989)
198(11)
Was the Monroe Doctrine of 1823 Designed to Protect the Latin American Countries from European Intervention?
209(22)
Yes: Dexter Perkins, from The Monroe Doctrine: 1823--1826 (Harvard University Press, 1975)
211(11)
No: Ernest R. May, from The Making of the Monroe Doctrine (Harvard University Press, 1975)
222(9)
Did the Election of 1828 Represent a Democratic Revolt of the People?
231(26)
Yes: Sean Wilentz, from The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln (Norton, 2005)
233(9)
No: Richard P. McCormick, from ``New Perspectives on Jacksonian Politics,'' American Historical Review (January 1960)
242(15)
PART 3 ANTEBELLUM AMERICA
257(98)
Did the Industrial Revolution Provide More Economic Opportunities for Women in the 1830s?
258(28)
Yes: Thomas Dublin, from ``Women, Work, and Protest in the Early Lowell Mills: `The Oppressing Hand of Avarice Would Enslave Us,''' Labor History (Winter 1975)
260(13)
No: Gerda Lerner, from ``The Lady and the Mill Girl: Changes in the Status of Women in the Age of Jackson,'' American Studies (Spring 1969)
273(13)
Did Slavery Destroy the Black Family?
286(27)
Yes: Wilma A. Dunaway, from The African-American Family in Slavery and Emancipation (Cambridge University Press, 2003)
288(13)
No: Eugene D. Genovese, from Roll Jordan Roll: The World the Slaves Made (Random House, 1974)
301(12)
Was the Mexican War an Exercise in American Imperialism?
313(21)
Yes: Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, from ``Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War,'' in Howard H. Quint, Milton Cantor, and Dean Albertson, eds., Main Problems in American History, 5th ed. (Dorsey Press, 1988)
315(8)
No: Norman A. Graebner, from ``The Mexican War: A Study in Causation,'' Pacific Historical Review (August 1980)
323(11)
Were the Abolitionists ``Unrestrained Fanatics''?
334(21)
Yes: C. Vann Woodward, from The Burden of Southern History, 3d ed. (Louisiana State University Press, 1993)
336(8)
No: Donald G. Mathews, from ``The Abolitionists on Slavery: The Critique Behind Social Movement,'' Journal of Southern History (May 1967)
344(11)
PART 4 CONFLICT AND RESOLUTION
355(66)
Was the Confederacy Defeated Because of Its ``Loss of Will''?
356(22)
Yes: Richard E. Beringer, Herman Hattaway, Archer Jones, William N. Still, Jr., from Why the South Lost the Civil War (University of Georgia Press, 1986)
358(12)
No: James M. McPherson, from The Illustrated Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford University Press, 2003)
370(8)
Did Abraham Lincoln Free the Slaves?
378(21)
Yes: Allen C. Guelzo, from Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: The End of Slavery in America (Simon & Schuster, 2004)
380(8)
No: Vincent Harding, from There Is a River: The Black Struggle for Freedom in America (Vintage Books, 1981)
388(11)
Was Reconstruction a ``Splendid Failure''?
399(22)
Yes: Eric Foner, from ``The New View of Reconstruction,'' American Heritage (October/November 1983)
401(10)
No: LaWanda Cox, from Lincoln and Black Freedom: A Study in Presidential Leadership (University of South Carolina Press, 1981)
411(10)
Contributors 421(6)
Index 427


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