CART

(0) items

Teaching Children to Read : Putting the Pieces Together,9780131121898

Teaching Children to Read : Putting the Pieces Together

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131121898

ISBN10:
0131121898
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $102.00

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$4.99

Hurry!

Only one copy
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
$1.00

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.31

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2004.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

For Elementary Reading Methods courses.This comprehensive and balanced look at literacy practice has long been one of the most popular reading methods texts available. The text begins by introducing seven principles for comprehensive reading instruction, and then explains the theoretical foundations of teaching reading. Part I builds on those foundations with specific methods in Part II, and then in Part III it describes how to create a variety of learning centers, and how to plan developmentally appropriate reading curriculum for students in both K-3 and 4-8 classrooms, chapters 12 and 13 provide a continuum of knowledge by describing classroon organization and curriculum for grades 4-6 and 6-8.

Table of Contents

PART I: PRINCIPLES AND FOUNDATIONS: UNDERSTANDING LITERACY DEVELOPMENT
1(94)
Introducing Comprehensive Reading Instruction for All Learners
2(20)
Focus Questions
2(1)
Key Concepts
3(1)
Reading in Today's Society
4(1)
The High Price of Reading Failure
4(1)
What Is Essential to Reading Instruction: Helping Every Child Succeed
5(1)
How Did YOU Learn to Read?
5(1)
The Seven Characteristics of Highly Successful Reading Teachers
6(3)
Reading Instruction: Looking Back and Looking Forward
9(4)
Traditional Approaches to Reading Instruction
9(1)
A Whole Language Approach
10(1)
Balanced Reading Instruction: An Attempted Compromise
10(2)
Comprehensive Reading Instruction: A Research-Based Solution
12(1)
Making Transitions Toward Comprehensive Reading Instruction
13(4)
Transitions Means Philosophical Movement
13(1)
Transitions Takes Time
14(1)
Transitions Involves Curriculum Integration
14(1)
Transitions Involves Risk Taking
14(1)
The Transitions Model: A Modest Proposal for Change
15(2)
Challenges Facing Preservice Teachers in Making Transitions
17(1)
Disharmony with Past Belief Systems and Practices
17(1)
Conflicting Views Among Educators
17(1)
Overcoming Tradition in the Schools
17(1)
Challenges Facing In-Service Teachers
18(1)
Time Commitment
18(1)
Comfort Zones
18(1)
Administrative Risk Taking
18(1)
Concept Applications
19(1)
Recommended Readings
20(2)
Language Learning and the Stages of Literacy Development
22(46)
Focus Questions
22(1)
Key Concepts
23(1)
On Becoming Literate
24(1)
Emergent Literacy
24(1)
Cognitive, Social, and Affective Aspects of Language Development
25(8)
Contributions of Piaget: Cognitive Development
25(4)
Contributions of Vygotsky: Social Interaction
29(2)
Affect: Motivation and Engagement
31(2)
Understanding Language
33(11)
The Semantic Cueing System in Language
33(3)
The Syntactic Cueing System in Language
36(1)
The Visual-Graphophonic Cueing System in Language
37(1)
Pragmatics
37(1)
Oral Language Acquisition
38(1)
Behaviorist Theory
38(1)
Innatist Theory
39(1)
Cognitive Theory
40(1)
Social Interactionist Theories
40(1)
Stages of Oral Language Development
40(4)
Development of Reading Behaviors
44(5)
The Mystery of Reading: The Magical Stage
44(3)
``Look, Mom, I'm Reading'': The Self-Concepting Reading Stage
47(1)
Spanning the Gap: The Bridging Stage
47(1)
Blast Off!: The Takeoff Stage
47(1)
``I Can Do It by Myself!'': The Independent Stage
48(1)
Reaching the Summit: The Skilled Reader
48(1)
Development of Storybook Reading Behaviors
49(2)
Picture-Governed
49(1)
Print-Governed
50(1)
Development of Writing Behaviors
51(10)
Scribbling and Drawing Stage
52(2)
Prephonemic Stage
54(1)
Early Phonemic Stage
55(2)
Letter-Naming Stage
57(1)
Transitional Stage
58(3)
Developing a Sense of Story
61(1)
Story Grammar Elements
61(1)
Understanding Print Concepts and the Language of Instruction
62(3)
Environmental Print Studies
63(1)
Student Perceptions of Reading
64(1)
Understanding Concepts About Print
65(1)
Summary
66(1)
Concept Applications
66(1)
Recommended Readings
67(1)
Theoretical Roots of Reading Instruction
68(27)
Focus Questions
68(1)
Key Concepts
69(1)
The Need for Understanding How Children Learn to Read
70(1)
Theories of the Reading Process
71(20)
Bottom-Up Theories of the Reading Process
72(1)
The Relationship of Bottom-Up Reading Theories to Phonics-First Reading Instruction
73(1)
Top-Down Theories of the Reading Process
74(3)
The Relationship of Top-Down Reading Theories to Whole-Word Reading Instruction
77(3)
Interactive Theories of the Reading Process: Resolving the Weaknesses and Combining the Strengths of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Reading Theories
80(1)
The Relationship of Interactive Theories of the Reading Process to Skills-Based Reading Instruction
81(2)
Transactional Theories of the Reading Process
83(3)
The Relationship of Transactional Theories of the Reading Process to Comprehensive Literacy Instruction
86(5)
Transitions in Reading Instruction Change Model
91(1)
Summary
91(1)
Concept Applications
92(1)
Recommended Readings
93(2)
PART II: METHODS AND ASSESSMENT: STRATEGIES THAT SUPPORT LITERACY DEVELOPMENT
95(228)
Phonemic Awareness and Phonics Instruction
96(24)
Focus Questions
96(1)
Key Concepts
97(1)
Research on Early Reading
98(2)
Report of the National Reading Panel
98(1)
Other Scientific Research on Reading Instruction: Common Findings
98(1)
Teachers Make the Difference
99(1)
An Evidence-Based Sequence of Instruction
100(1)
Phonemic Awareness
101(6)
An Anticipation Guide on Phonemic Awareness
101(1)
Research on Phonemic Awareness
101(3)
Some Misunderstandings About Phonemic Awareness
104(1)
The Instructional Sequence for Phonemic Awareness
105(1)
Some Tips for Planning Instruction in Phonemic Awareness
106(1)
Alphabetic Principle
107(1)
Phonics Instruction in Comprehensive Reading Classrooms
108(7)
A Phonics Prereading Quiz
108(1)
Phonics: What We Know from Research and Practice
108(1)
Arguments For and Against Intensive Phonics Instruction
109(1)
Some Important Phonics Generalizations to Teach
110(2)
Other Important Phonics Terms and Skills
112(1)
Onset and Rime
112(1)
Structural Analysis: An Important Next Step
113(2)
Putting It All Together: A Sequence of World Identification Skills
115(1)
Summary
115(1)
Concept Applications
116(2)
Classroom Resources for Teachers
118(1)
Recommended Readings
119(1)
Increasing Vocabulary and Word Knowledge
120(34)
Focus Questions
120(1)
Key Concepts
121(1)
Where and How Do Students Acquire New Vocabulary?
122(1)
Research on Vocabulary Learning
122(2)
Vocabulary Is Built Through Language Interactions
123(1)
The Four Types of Vocabulary
123(1)
Levels of Vocabulary Learning
123(1)
What Research Tells Us About Teaching Vocabulary
124(1)
Principles of Effective Vocabulary Instruction
125(2)
Which Words Should We Teach?
127(4)
Why You Shouldn't Try to Teach ALL Unknown Words
127(1)
Words You Should Teach
127(4)
Common Strategies Used in Vocabulary Instruction
131(10)
Word Banks
131(1)
Specific Word Instruction
131(3)
Making Words
134(1)
Function (Four-Letter) Words
135(2)
Teaching Word Functions and Changes
137(4)
Shared Reading Experiences and Vocabulary Learning
141(1)
Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners (ELL)
141(5)
Using the Vocabulary Cluster Strategy with ELL Students
142(1)
Semantic Maps
142(3)
Linking Multicultural Experiences with Vocabulary Development
145(1)
Helping Students Acquire New Vocabulary Independently
146(4)
Word Learning Strategies
146(1)
Encouraging Wide Reading
147(2)
Computer-Assisted Vocabulary Learning
149(1)
Vocabulary Overview
149(1)
Word Maps
149(1)
Summary
150(1)
Concept Applications
151(1)
Recommended Readings
152(2)
Improving Reading Comprehension
154(42)
Focus Questions
154(1)
Key Concepts
155(1)
Issues in Teaching Reading Comprehension
156(2)
Instruction or Assessment?
156(1)
Teaching Comprehension in the Primary Grades
157(1)
Teaching Comprehension in the Information Age
157(1)
Comprehension Strategy Instruction: Single Strategies or Multiple Strategies?
157(1)
Comprehending Text: Schema Theory
158(1)
Comprehending Text: A Process Overview
159(2)
Comprehension Difficulties
161(2)
A Model for Effective Comprehension Instruction
163(2)
Gradual Release of Responsibility Instruction Model
163(2)
Comprehension Instruction: Phrases and Sentences
165(2)
``Clozing'' in on Comprehension: Deriving the Meaning of Words in Text
165(1)
Phrasing for Comprehension: ``Chunking'' and ``Readers' Theater''
166(1)
Comprehension Instruction: Connecting Information and Making Inferences
167(4)
Connecting Ideas Among Sentences
167(1)
Drawing Inferences: Making Connections Across Sentences in Text
168(3)
Comprehension Instruction: Teaching Students About Text Structures
171(12)
Understanding Stories: Narrative Text Structure
171(6)
Accessing Information: Information Text Structure
177(3)
Experience-Text-Relationships (E-T-R): Discussing Information Texts
180(3)
Comprehension Instruction: Interpretation and Elaboration
183(3)
K-W-L
183(1)
Imagery: Elaborating the Meaning of Text
184(1)
Affective Responses: Interpreting and Elaborating Meaning
185(1)
Strategies for Effective Questioning
186(3)
Question-Answer Relationship
187(1)
Questioning the Author
188(1)
Comprehension Instruction: Monitoring and Self-Regulation
189(2)
Metacognition and Fix-Up Strategies
189(2)
Comprehension Instruction: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners
191(1)
Contextual Diagrams: Labeling the Situational Context
191(1)
Comprehension Instruction: Meeting the Needs of Struggling Readers
191(2)
Summary
193(1)
Concept Applications
193(1)
Recommended Readings
194(2)
Developing Reading Fluency
196(24)
Focus Questions
196(1)
Key Concepts
197(3)
What Is Reading Fluency?
198(1)
What Skills Do Fluent Readers Possess?
198(2)
Fluency Is Sometimes Ignored in Basal Reading Programs
200(1)
Developing Reading Fluency
200(1)
How Readers Develop Fluency
200(1)
Organizing for Instruction: The Fluency Formula
201(17)
Planning for Instruction
201(5)
Step I: Passage Introduction and Modeling
206(1)
Step II: Guided Oral Reading Practice
206(7)
Step III: Independent Practice
213(2)
Step IV: Performance Reading for Fluency Assessment
215(3)
Summary
218(1)
Concept Applications
218(1)
Recommended Readings
219(1)
Materials and Programs for Literacy Instruction: Basals and Beyond
220(42)
Focus Questions
220(1)
Key Concepts
221(1)
Understanding the Basal Reader
222(3)
Anatomy of the Basal Reading Approach
225(14)
The Basal Teacher's Edition
226(3)
The Student's Basal Text
229(1)
Beginning Reading Texts
230(2)
The Workbook
232(5)
Assessment
237(1)
Record Keeping
238(1)
Production and Organization of Basal Readers
239(7)
Strengths and Weaknesses of Basal Readers
239(4)
Organization of the Basal Reader
243(1)
A Closer Look at the Anatomy of a Basal Reading Lesson
244(2)
Instructional Plans for More Effectively Using the Basal Teacher's Edition
246(2)
Reconciled Reading Lesson
246(2)
Reciprocal Questioning
248(1)
Contrasting Differing Philosophical Emphases in Published Basal Reading Series
248(2)
Decoding Emphasis Basal Reading Series
250(1)
Literature-Based Basal Reading Series
250(1)
Adopting and Evaluating Basal Readers
250(8)
Adopting a Basal Reader Program
251(1)
Evaluating Basal Readers
252(2)
Selected Effective Reading Programs of National Significance
254(4)
Helping Students with Special Needs Succeed with Basal Reader Instruction
258(1)
Helping Students with Diverse Cultural or Language Needs Succeed with Basal Readers
259(1)
Summary
259(1)
Concept Applications
260(1)
Recommended Readings
261(1)
Assessing Literacy Learning
262(61)
Focus Questions
262(1)
Key Concepts
263(1)
Principles of Classroom Assessment
264(3)
Principle 1: Assessment Should Inform and Improve Teaching
264(1)
Principle 2: Assessment Procedures Should Help Teachers Discover What Children Can Do, Not Only What They Cannot Do
264(1)
Principle 3: Every Assessment Procedure Should Have a Specific Purpose
265(1)
Principle 4: Classroom Assessment Should Be Linked to Accountability Standards and Provide Insights Into the Process of Reading
265(1)
Principle 5: Assessment Procedures Should Help Identify Zones of Proximal Development
266(1)
Principle 6: Assessment Strategies Should Not Supplant Instruction
266(1)
Principle 7: The Most Valid Assessment Is Individual Assessment
266(1)
Traditional Reading Assessment
267(4)
Informal Reading Inventories
267(1)
Group Reading Tests
268(1)
Individual Diagnostic Reading Tests
268(1)
Other Reading-Related Tests
269(1)
Problems with Many Traditional Reading Tests
270(1)
Comprehensive Reading Assessment
271(4)
Portfolio Assessment Schemes: An Approach for Collecting Information
272(1)
Kid Watching: Classroom Observations of Children and Reading
273(1)
Reading Milestones
274(1)
Methods for Assessing Reading Development
275(22)
Running Records
275(12)
The Burke Reading Interview
287(1)
Interest Inventory
287(1)
Concepts About Print
287(1)
Alphabet Knowledge (Early Readers)
288(1)
Additional Observation Checklists and Scales
289(1)
Fluency Evaluation
290(1)
Reading Logs
291(1)
Retellings
291(1)
Story Maps
292(1)
Teacher-Made Cloze Tests
293(1)
Questioning
294(1)
Family Surveys of Reading Habits
295(2)
Evaluating Your Program: Assessing the Big Picture
297(4)
Evaluating the Classroom Environment
297(1)
Self-Rating Scales
297(1)
Additional Suggestions for Using Reading Portfolios
298(1)
Using Rubrics to Improve Reading Analyses
299(2)
Getting Organized: Profiling Your Class
301(2)
Two Documents Needed for Profiling
301(1)
Student Profiling Document
301(1)
Classroom Profiling Document
301(2)
Reporting Progress to Families: What About Grades?
303(10)
Reading Logs
308(1)
Running Records
308(1)
Retellings
309(1)
Literature-Response Projects
310(1)
Cloze Tests
311(1)
Questioning
311(1)
Evaluation Forms
311(1)
Fluency Measures
312(1)
Potential Pitfalls in Comprehensive Reading Assessment
313(1)
Overcommitment (by Teachers) to Daily Entries
313(1)
Spending Too Much Time Managing Portfolios
313(1)
Too Many Contributions by Students
313(1)
Other Issues in Reading Assessment
314(5)
The Notion of Skill Mastery
314(1)
The Need for a Variety of Reading Contexts in Assessment
314(1)
Power Tests Versus Timed Tests
315(1)
Norm-Referenced Tests Versus State-Developed Tests
315(1)
Authentic Grading
315(1)
Assessing Affective and Conative Factors in Reading
316(3)
Summary
319(1)
Concept Applications
320(1)
Recommended Readings
321(2)
PART III: CLASSROOM PRACTICE: ORGANIZING AND PLANNING FOR LITERACY INSTRUCTION
323(209)
Organizing for Reading Instruction: Starting Out Right in Grades K--3
324(54)
Focus Questions
324(1)
Key Concepts
325(1)
Welcome to Ms. Miskle's First Grade!
326(1)
First Steps: Preparing the Environment for Effective Literacy Instruction
326(1)
Designing a Classroom Floor Plan
327(1)
Planning Whole-Class Learning and Sharing Areas
327(2)
Planning the Teacher's Professional Space
329(3)
Planning Small-Group Instruction and Learning Centers
332(12)
Critical-Standing Learning Centers
334(7)
Highly Recommended Standing Learning Centers
341(1)
Elective-Temporary Learning Centers
342(2)
Organizing Classroom Literary Tools and Materials
344(3)
Organizing Instructional Tools and Materials for Effective Literacy Instruction
347(4)
Trade Books
347(1)
Basal Readers
348(1)
Workbooks, Worksheets, and Blackline Masters
348(1)
Leveled Books
349(1)
Decodable Books
349(1)
Computers and Other Information Technology
350(1)
Making the Most of Classroom Display Areas
351(2)
Planning and Organizing Necessary Storage Space
353(1)
Making the Most of Human Resources: Organizing for Effective Use of Parents, Volunteers, Aides, and Tutors
354(4)
Grouping Students for Effective Literacy Instruction
358(3)
Ability Grouping
358(1)
Flexible Learning Groups
359(1)
Cooperative Learning Groups
360(1)
Instructional Needs Grouping
361(1)
Getting Off to a Good Start: Planning the First Day of School
361(11)
Preparing Parents and Students for Success: Making the Initial Contact with a Letter
364(2)
First Impressions
366(1)
Establishing a Plan for Beginning Each School Day
367(2)
Establishing a Morning Routine
369(1)
Making the Classroom Work: Rules and Consequences
370(1)
Reading from the Start: Getting Attention and Giving Directions
370(1)
Literacy Activities on the First Day
371(1)
Planning the First Week
372(3)
Summary
375(1)
Concept Applications
376(1)
Recommended Readings
377(1)
Providing Effective K--3 Literacy Instruction: Every Child a Reader
378(42)
Focus Questions
378(1)
Key Concepts
379(1)
Ms. Rivera, Second Grade Teacher: Observing a Master at Work
380(1)
Characteristics of Exemplary Primary Grade Literacy Teachers
381(4)
Designing a Yearlong Curriculum Plan
381(4)
Creating an Annual Assessment Plan
385(6)
The Political Roots of the Current Literacy Emphasis
385(2)
Using Assessment Data to Improve Instruction
387(4)
Planning Daily Instructional Routines: Reading-Writing Workshop
391(18)
Reading and Writing Together
392(7)
Working with Words and Strategies
399(1)
Reading/Writing Learning Centers
400(8)
Fluency Workshop and Assessment
408(1)
Student Sharing Time
409(1)
School-Family--Community Partnerships
409(3)
Supported Reading: Read-Along Cassettes and Take-Home Books
411(1)
Supported Writing: Traveling Tales Backpack
412(1)
Adapting Reading Instruction for Struggling Readers
412(4)
Reading Recovery: A Program for Assisting Struggling First Graders
414(1)
Adapting Instruction to Meet the Needs of Limited English Proficient Learners
415(1)
Summary
416(1)
Concept Applications
416(1)
Recommended Readings
417(3)
The Transition Years: Grades 4--6
420(70)
Focus Questions
420(1)
Key Concepts
421(1)
Ms. Tahan Gets Things Popping!
422(2)
Changing Realities: Reading Instruction in the Transition Years
424(1)
Keeping Our ``Balance''
424(1)
A Turning Point for Struggling Readers
424(1)
Skills to Be Learned: Reading Standards for Grades 4--6
425(1)
The First Days and Weeks of School
425(10)
The First Day
425(7)
The First Weeks: Reading and Writing Instruction
432(3)
Organizing for Reading Instruction
435(31)
Developing Integrated Curriculums
435(1)
The Role of Literature and Expository Texts
435(1)
How to Choose the Best Books for Instruction
436(1)
Using Basal Readers
436(1)
The Reading Workshop
436(12)
Core Book Units
448(2)
Themed Literature Units
450(4)
Teaching Themed Literature Units: The Nuts and Bolts
454(12)
Evaluating Themed Literature Units
466(1)
Comprehension: Focus on Expository Texts
466(1)
The Writing Process: Making Authors of Readers
467(14)
Understanding the Writing Process
467(1)
Skills to be Learned: Writing Standards for Grades 4--6
467(1)
Prewriting Stage
467(7)
Drafting Stage
474(1)
Revising and Editing
475(1)
Publishing
476(1)
The Writing Workshop
477(3)
Classroom Computers and Writing Development
480(1)
Learners with Special Needs
481(3)
Focus on English Language Learners
481(3)
Involving Families
484(3)
Refrigerator Reading
485(1)
Family Projects
485(1)
Voice Mail
485(2)
Buddy Journals
487(1)
Summary
487(1)
Concept Applications
487(1)
Recommended Readings
488(2)
Reading in the Middle School
490(42)
Focus Questions
490(1)
Key Concepts
491(1)
Can You Always Believe What You Read?
492(1)
Helping Students Succeed with Content Reading Materials
493(1)
Why Content Reading Is So Challenging for Some Students: The Nature of Expository Texts
493(7)
Specialized Vocabulary and Concepts
494(1)
Increased Concept Load
495(2)
Readability Considerations
497(1)
Unique Writing Patterns
497(3)
Preparing to Teach: Analyzing Readings and Creating Study Aids
500(2)
Performing a Content Analysis
500(2)
Constructing Learning Tools
502(11)
Using Graphic Organizers or Go! Charts
502(3)
Study Guides
505(2)
Vocabulary Development Activities
507(3)
Choosing High-Interest Reading Materials
510(1)
Using Trade Books as Supplements to Textbooks
511(2)
Proven Study Strategies: Helping Students Help Themselves
513(4)
Efficient (Speed Reading) Study Strategies
513(2)
SQ3R
515(1)
SQRQCQ
515(1)
Comprehension Monitoring (Metacognition)
516(1)
Writing to Deepen Learning: Having Students Create Their Own Expository Texts
517(2)
Paraphrase Writing
517(1)
Using Text Structures
517(1)
Cubes
518(1)
Reading Across the Curriculum: Themed Studies
519(5)
Guidelines for Conducting Themed Studies
519(4)
Thematic Unit Materials
523(1)
Unit Scaffolding
523(1)
Programs for Struggling Readers
524(3)
Commercial Programs for Low-Performing Readers
525(1)
Comprehension ``Strategy Families''
526(1)
Improving Fluency
527(1)
Helping English Language Learners with Content Area Texts
527(2)
Modifying Linguistic Variables
528(1)
Modifying Knowledge Variables
528(1)
Literacy Variables
528(1)
Summary
529(1)
Concept Applications
530(1)
Recommended Readings
530(2)
Appendix A: Comprehensive Literacy Resources for Teachers 532(14)
Appendix B: Selected Resources for Teachers 546(6)
Appendix C: Blank Miscue Grid 552(3)
References 555(39)
Name Index 594(6)
Subject Index 600(13)
About the Authors 613


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...