CART

(0) items

Teaching In The Middle And Secondary Schools,9780131193734
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Teaching In The Middle And Secondary Schools

by ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780131193734

ISBN10:
0131193732
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Related Products


  • Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools
    Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools
  • Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools
    Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools
  • Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools
    Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools





Summary

Teaching in the Middle and Secondary Schools, 8e, is a highly practical book for teachers in middle school and secondary schools.Teachers will find practical classroom applications for planning instruction, selecting and using instructional strategies, and assessment. Its modular format includes exercises and post-tests in each module. Inservice Teachers in Middle and Secondary Schools.

Table of Contents

PART 1 Introduction to Teaching and Learning in Middle and Secondary Schools
1(54)
Today's Middle and Secondary Schools: Purpose, Organization, Structure, and Reform
2(29)
Middle and Secondary Schools
3(1)
Colonial Education: The First Schools
3(1)
The Advent of Secondary Education: The Forerunners of Today's High Schools
3(1)
Latin Grammar Schools
3(1)
Academies
3(1)
English Classical Schools: The First American Public High Schools
4(1)
Funding for Public Secondary Education
4(1)
The Creation of Junior High Schools
4(1)
The Creation of Middle Schools
4(1)
The Changing Purpose of Education
5(1)
Reform Initiatives
6(1)
Early Reform Efforts
6(1)
Goals 2000
6(1)
No Child Left Behind
7(1)
Reforming Middle Schools
7(1)
Today's Middle and Secondary Schools
7(1)
Organizing Education to Meet Students' Needs
7(3)
Organization
7(1)
The Middle School Concept and Philosophy
8(1)
Middle Schools and Junior High Schools
8(1)
Organizational Provisions for Student Differences
8(1)
Curriculum Tracks and Homogeneous Grouping
9(1)
Structuring Schools to Meet Students' Needs
10(3)
The Structure of Middle Schools and High Schools
10(1)
The School Calendar Year
10(1)
The School Day
10(1)
Nonstandard Daily Starting Times
10(1)
Teaching Teams
10(1)
The School-Within-a-School (SWAS) Concept
11(1)
Teacher's Daily Schedules
11(1)
Common Planning Time for Interdisciplinary Teams
11(1)
Nontraditional Scheduling
12(1)
Block Scheduling: Advantages and Disadvantages
12(1)
Modifying the Curriculum to Facilitate Student Learning
13(1)
Striving to Present Quality Education for All Students
13(1)
Providing Challenging Curriculum Options
13(1)
Embracing Student Diversity to Meet Students' Needs
14(1)
At-Risk Students
14(1)
Responsive Practices for Helping All Students Succeed in School
14(1)
Preparing Teachers to Teach in a Diverse Classroom
14(2)
The Fundamental Characteristic of Exemplary Education
14(1)
Committed Teachers
14(1)
Reflective Decision Making and the Locus of Control
14(2)
Decision-Making and Thought-Processing Phases of Instruction
16(1)
Reflection and the Decision-Making Process
16(1)
Developing a Teaching Style
16(1)
A Model for Teaching
16(1)
Accessing Community Resources to Meet Students' Needs: Telecommunications Networks, Members of the Community, and Parent Organizations
17(1)
Vehicles for Obtaining and Sharing Ideas and Information
17(1)
Home and School Connections
17(1)
Community Service Learning
17(1)
Telecommunications Networks
17(1)
The Emergent Overall Picture
18(2)
Key Trends and Practices Today
19(1)
Problems and Issues That Plague the Nation's Schools
19(1)
Your Emerging Teaching Style
20(1)
Exercise 1.1 Methods of Instruction
21(1)
Exercise 1.2 The Teacher as Reflective Decision-Maker
22(1)
Exercise 1.3 The Preactive Phase of Instruction
23(1)
Exercise 1.4 My First Micro Peer-Teaching Demonstration---MPT 1
24(1)
Exercise 1.5 Reflecting Upon My Own School Experiences
24(1)
Summary
25(1)
Module 1 Posttest
25(2)
Suggested Readings
27(1)
Endnotes
28(3)
Middle and Secondary School Students
31(24)
Adolescence
32(1)
Characteristics of Middle and Secondary School Students
32(1)
Teaching Adolescents
32(1)
Adolescent Development
32(1)
Culture and Its Impact on Education
33(2)
Cultural Identity
33(1)
Cultural Competence
34(1)
Cultural Sensitivity
34(1)
Multicultural Education
34(1)
The Classroom in a Nation of Increasing Diversity
35(1)
Demographic Changes
35(1)
Styles of Learning and Implications for Teaching
36(1)
Learning Modalities
36(1)
Exercise 2.1A Create an Ice-Breaker Activity Addressing the Learning Modalities
37(1)
Exercise 2.1B Create a Warm-Up Activity Addressing the Learning Modalities
37(1)
Learning Styles
37(1)
The Learning Cycle
38(1)
Learning Capacities: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences
38(1)
Exercise 2.2 Modify a Lesson Plan to Integrate the Multiple Intelligences
39(2)
Learning Style and Its Implications for Teaching
40(1)
Meeting the Challenge: Recognizing and Providing for Student Differences
41(1)
Instructional Practices That Provide for Student Differences: General Guidelines
41(1)
Recognizing and Working with Exceptional Students
41(1)
Guidelines for Working with Students with Special Needs in the Regular Classroom
42(1)
Working with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students
43(1)
Additional Guidelines for Working with English Language Learners
44(1)
Best Practices for Promoting Success for All Students
44(1)
Recognizing and Working with Students Who Are Gifted
45(1)
Guidelines for Working with Gifted Students
46(1)
Recognizing and Working with Students Who Take More Time but Are Willing to Try
46(1)
Recognizing and Working with Recalcitrant Students
47(1)
Teaching Toward Positive Character Development
47(1)
Multitasking
48(1)
Summary
48(1)
Module 2 Posttest
49(2)
Suggested Readings
51(1)
Endnotes
52(3)
PART 2 Planning for Instruction
55(114)
Establishing and Maintaining a Safe and Supportive Classroom Learning Environment
56(35)
The Importance of Perceptions
57(1)
Classroom Control: Its Meaning---Past and Present
57(5)
Historical Meaning of Classroom Control
58(1)
Today's Meaning of Classroom Control and the Concept of Classroom Management
58(1)
Classroom Management: Contributions of Some Leading Authorities
58(3)
Developing Your Own Effective Approach to Classroom Management
61(1)
Providing a Supportive Learning Environment
62(2)
Create a Positive Classroom Atmosphere
62(1)
Behaviors to Avoid
62(1)
Get to Know Your Students as People
62(2)
Preparation Provides Confidence and Success
64(1)
Effective Organization and Administration of Activities and Materials
65(1)
Natural Interruptions and Disruptions to Routine
65(1)
Classroom Procedures and Guidelines for Acceptable Behavior
65(4)
Designing Your Room Arrangement
65(1)
Starting the School Term Well
66(1)
Procedures Rather Than Rules; Consequences Rather Than Punishment
66(1)
The First Day
67(1)
Establishing Classroom Expectations, Procedures, and Consequences
68(1)
What Students Need to Understand from the Start
68(1)
Exercise 3.1 Observing a Classroom for Frequency of External Interruptions
69(2)
Exercise 3.2 Teachers' Behavior Management Systems
71(1)
Exercise 3.3 Beginning the Development of My Classroom Management System
71(1)
Using Positive Rewards
72(1)
Managing Class Meetings
73(1)
Opening Activities
73(1)
Exercise 3.4 Observation and Analysis of How Teachers Start Class Meetings
74(1)
Smooth Implementation of the Lesson
74(1)
Transitions: A Difficult Skill for Beginning Teachers
75(1)
Student Misbehavior
75(3)
Categories of Student Misbehavior
75(2)
There Are Success Stories
77(1)
Teacher Response to Student Misbehavior: Direct and Indirect Intervention
77(1)
Teacher-Caused Student Misbehavior: Scenarios for Review
78(2)
Preventing a Ship from Sinking Is Much Easier Than Saving a Sinking One: Mistakes to Avoid
80(5)
Exercise 3.5 Applying Measures of Control
85(1)
Exercise 3.6 Selecting Measures of Control
86(1)
Summary
87(1)
Module 3 Posttest
87(2)
Suggested Readings
89(1)
Endnotes
90(1)
Selecting Content and Preparing Objectives
91(34)
Reasons for Planning Thoughtfully and Thoroughly
92(1)
Components of Instructional Planning
92(1)
Planning a Course
93(2)
Documents That Provide Guidance for Content Selection
93(1)
National Curriculum Standards
94(1)
Exercise 4.1 Examining National Curriculum Standards
95(1)
Exercise 4.2 Examining State Curriculum Documents
96(1)
Exercise 4.3 Examining Local Curriculum Documents
97(1)
Student Textbooks
98(1)
Benefit of Student Textbooks to Student Learning
98(1)
Problems with Reliance on a Single Textbook
98(1)
Exercise 4.4 Examining Student Textbooks and Teachers' Editions
99(2)
Guidelines for Textbook Use
100(1)
Introducing the Textbook
101(1)
Multitext and Multireadings Approaches
101(1)
Other Printed Materials
101(1)
The Future for School Textbooks
102(1)
Collaborative Planning
102(1)
Team Planning
102(1)
Teacher-Student Collaboration in Planning
103(1)
Preparing for the Year
103(1)
Exercise 4.5 Preparing a Content Outline
103(1)
Preparing for and Dealing with Controversy
104(1)
Exercise 4.6A Dealing with Controversial Content and Issues
105(1)
Exercise 4.6B Censorship: Books That Are Sometimes Challenged
106(2)
Aims, Goals, and Objectives: A Clarification
108(1)
Instructional Objectives and Their Relationship to Curriculum and Assessment
108(2)
Learning Targets and Goal Indicators
108(1)
Overt and Covert Performance Outcomes
109(1)
Balance of Behaviorism and Constructivism
109(1)
Teaching Toward Multiple Objectives, Understandings, and Appreciations
109(1)
Preparing Instructional Objectives
110(1)
The ABCDs of Writing Objectives
110(1)
Exercise 4.7 Recognizing Verbs That Are Acceptable for Overt Objectives---A Self-Check Exercise
110(1)
Exercise 4.8 Recognizing the Parts of Criterion-Referenced Behavioral Objectives---A Self-Check Exercise
111(1)
Exercise 4.9 Recognizing Objectives That Are Measurable---A Self-Check Exercise
112(1)
Classifying Instructional Objectives
113(4)
The Domains of Learning and the Developmental Needs of Youth
113(4)
Exercise 4.10 Assessing Recognition of Objectives According to Domain---A Self-Check Exercise
117(1)
Exercise 4.11 Preparing My Own Instructional Objectives
118(1)
Using the Taxonomies
118(2)
Observing for Connected (Meaningful) Learning: Logs, Portfolios, and Journals
119(1)
Character Education
120(1)
Learning That Is Not Immediately Observable
120(1)
Summary
120(1)
Module 4 Posttest
121(2)
Suggested Readings
123(1)
Endnotes
123(2)
Preparing an Instructional Plan
125(44)
Planning for Instruction: A Three-Level and Seven-Step Process
126(1)
The Syllabus
126(4)
Use and Development of a Syllabus
126(3)
Content of a Syllabus
129(1)
Exercise 5.1 Content of a Course Syllabus
130(2)
Exercise 5.2 Preparing a Course Syllabus---An Exercise in Collaborative Thinking
132(1)
The Instructional Unit
132(2)
Types of Instructional Units
132(1)
Planning and Developing Any Unit of Instruction
133(1)
Unit Format, Inclusive Elements, and Time Duration
134(1)
Curriculum Integration
134(4)
Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge
134(1)
The Spectrum of Integrated Curriculum
135(1)
Definition of Integrated Curriculum
135(1)
Integrated Curricula Past and Present
135(1)
Levels of Curriculum Integration
135(1)
Procedure for Planning and Developing an Interdisciplinary Thematic Unit
136(2)
Exercise 5.3 Generating Ideas for Interdisciplinary Units
138(1)
Exercise 5.4 Integrating the Topic
139(1)
Lesson Planning: Rationale and Assumptions
140(3)
Rationale for Preparing Written Lesson Plans
140(1)
Assumptions About Lesson Planning
140(1)
A Continual Process
141(1)
Well Planned but Open to Last-Minute Change
141(2)
The Problem of Time
143(1)
A Caution About ``The Daily Planning Book''
143(1)
Constructing a Lesson Plan: Format, Components, and Samples
143(2)
For Guidance, Reflection, and Reference
145(1)
Basic Elements of a Lesson Plan
145(16)
Descriptive Data
150(1)
Goals and Objectives
150(1)
Rationale
150(1)
Procedure
150(9)
Assignments
159(1)
Materials and Equipment to Be Used
160(1)
Accommodations for Students with Special Needs
160(1)
Assessment
160(1)
Reflection and Revision
160(1)
Exercise 5.5 Analysis of a Lesson That Failed
161(1)
Exercise 5.6A Preparing a Lesson Plan
162(1)
Exercise 5.6B Self- and Peer-Assessment of My Lesson Plan
162(1)
Exercise 5.7 Preparing an Instructional Unit
163(4)
Summary
164(1)
Module 5 Posttest
165(1)
Suggested Readings
166(1)
Endnotes
167(2)
PART 3 SELECTING AND IMPLEMENTING INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
169(84)
Student-Centered Instructional Strategies
170(30)
Principles of Classroom Instruction and Learning: A Synopsis
171(2)
Culturally Sensitive Pedagogy
172(1)
Direct vs. Indirect Instructional Modes: Strengths and Weaknesses of Each
172(1)
Selecting Learning Activities
173(2)
The Learning Experiences Ladder
173(2)
Direct, Simulated, and Vicarious Experiences Help Connect Student Learning
175(1)
Exercise 6.1 A Reflection on My Past Involvement with Student-Centered Instructional Activities
175(2)
Exercise 6.2 Recalling My Own Learning Experiences in School
177(1)
The Total Class as a Group Enterprise
177(1)
Learning in Pairs
178(2)
Peer Tutoring, Mentoring, and Cross-Age Coaching
178(1)
Paired Team Learning
179(1)
Think-Pair-Share
179(1)
The Learning Center
179(1)
Learning in Small Groups
180(1)
Purposes for Using Small Groups
180(1)
Cooperative Learning
180(2)
The Cooperative Learning Group (CLG)
181(1)
Why Some Teachers Have Difficulty Using CLGs
182(1)
Teaching Thinking for Intelligent Behavior
182(2)
Characteristics of Intelligent Behavior
182(2)
Direct Teaching for Thinking and Intelligent Behavior
184(1)
Research Imperatives for the Teaching of Thinking
184(1)
Direct Teaching of Skills Used in Thinking
184(1)
Inquiry Teaching and Discovery Learning
184(4)
Problem Solving
184(1)
Inquiry vs. Discovery
184(2)
True Inquiry
186(1)
The Critical Thinking Skills of Discovery and Inquiry
186(2)
Project-Centered Learning: Guiding Learning from Independent and Group Investigations, Papers, and Oral Reports
188(1)
Values and Purposes of Project-Centered Learning
188(1)
Writing Across the Curriculum
189(1)
Kinds of Writing
189(1)
Student Journals
190(1)
Purpose and Assessment of Student Journal Writing
190(1)
Learning by Educational Games
190(1)
Purposes of Educational Games
191(1)
Sources of Educational Games
191(1)
Integrating Strategies for Integrated Learning
191(3)
Exercise 6.3 Study of Inquiry and Strategy Integration
194(1)
Summary
194(1)
Module 6 Posttest
195(2)
Suggested Readings
197(1)
Endnotes
198(2)
Teacher-Centered Instructional Strategies
200(33)
Teacher Talk: Formal and Informal
201(5)
Cautions in Using Teacher Talk
201(1)
Teacher Talk: General Guidelines
201(1)
Teacher Talk: Specific Guidelines
202(4)
Demonstration
206(1)
Purposes of Demonstrations
206(1)
Guidelines for Using Demonstrations
206(1)
Exercise 7.1 The Lecture---Summary Review and Practice
207(1)
Questioning
208(4)
Purposes for Using Questioning
208(1)
Questions to Avoid Asking
209(1)
Types of Questions: A Glossary
209(1)
Socratic Questioning
210(1)
Levels of Cognitive Questions and Student Thinking
210(2)
Exercise 7.2 Identifying the Cognitive Levels of Questions---A Self-Check Exercise
212(2)
Guidelines for Using Questioning
213(1)
Exercise 7.3 Think-Time and the Art of Questioning---An In-Class Exercise
214(3)
Questions from Students: The Question-Driven Classroom
216(1)
Exercise 7.4 An Analysis of the Quality of Questions---A Self-Check Exercise
217(1)
Exercise 7.5 Observing the Cognitive Levels of Classroom Verbal Interaction
218(1)
Exercise 7.6 A Cooperative Learning Exercise in the Use of Questioning---Micro Peer-Teaching II
219(2)
Whole-Class Discussion
221(1)
Exercise 7.7A Whole-Class Discussion as a Teaching Strategy: Building Upon What I Already Know
221(1)
Exercise 7.7B Generating Guidelines for Using Whole-Class Discussions
222(1)
Recitation
222(1)
Equality in the Classroom
223(1)
Title IX: Student Rights
223(1)
Exercise 7.8 Teacher Interaction with Students According to Student Gender or Other Personal Characteristics
224(1)
Ensuring Equity
225(1)
Learning from Assignments and Homework
225(1)
Purposes and Guidelines for Using Assignments and Homework
225(1)
Giving Students a Second Chance
226(1)
How to Avoid Having So Many Papers to Grade That Time for Effective Planning Is Restricted
227(1)
Memorizing and Reviewing: Unavoidable Learning Strategies
227(1)
Exercise 7.9 Developing a Lesson Using Inquiry Level II, Thinking Skill Development, a Demonstration, or an Interactive Lecture---Micro Peer-Teaching III
228(2)
Summary
230(1)
Module 7 Posttest
230(2)
Suggested Readings
232(1)
Endnotes
232(1)
Media, Aids, and Resources
233(20)
Printed Materials and Visual Displays
234(1)
Sources of Free and Inexpensive Printed Materials
234(1)
The Internet
234(1)
Exercise 8.1 Internet Sites of Use to Teachers
235(6)
Cautions and Guidelines for Using the Internet
235(1)
Professional Journals and Periodicals
236(1)
The ERIC Information Network
236(1)
Copying Printed Materials
237(1)
The Classroom Writing Board
237(2)
The Classroom Bulletin Board
239(1)
The Community as a Resource
239(1)
Guest Speakers
239(1)
Field Trips
239(2)
Media Tools
241(4)
When Equipment Malfunctions: Troubleshooting
242(1)
The Overhead Projector
242(1)
The Document Camera
243(1)
Multimedia Program
243(1)
Television, Videos, and Videodiscs
244(1)
Computers and Computer-Based Instructional Tools
245(4)
The Placement and Use of Computers: The Online Classroom
246(1)
Selecting Computer Software
246(1)
The CD-ROM
247(1)
Sources of Free and Inexpensive Audiovisual Materials
247(1)
Using Copyrighted Video, Computer, and Multimedia Programs
247(2)
Distance Learning
249(1)
Summary
249(1)
Module 8 Posttest
249(2)
Suggested Readings
251(1)
Endnotes
252(1)
PART 4 Assessment of Teaching and Learning
253(56)
Assessing and Reporting Student Achievement
254(34)
Purposes and Principles of Assessment
255(1)
Terms Used in Assessment
256(1)
Assessment and Evaluation
256(1)
Measurement and Assessment
256(1)
Validity and Realiability
256(1)
Authentic Assessment: Advantages and Disadvantages
257(1)
Diagnostic, Formative, and Summative Assessment
257(1)
Assessing Student Learning: Three Avenues
257(3)
Importance and Weight of Each Avenue
258(1)
Assessing What a Student Says and Does
258(1)
Assessing What a Student Writes
259(1)
Assessment for Affective and Psychomotor Domain Learning
260(1)
Student Involvement in Assessment
260(2)
Using Student Portfolios
261(1)
Using Checklists
261(1)
Maintaining Records of Student Achievement
262(2)
Recording Teacher Observations and Judgments
262(2)
Grading and Marking Student Achievement
264(2)
Criterion-Referenced Versus Norm-Referenced Grading
264(1)
Determining Grades
265(1)
Testing for Achievement
266(2)
Standardized and Nonstandardized Tests
266(1)
Purposes for Testing
266(1)
Frequency of Testing
267(1)
Test Construction
267(1)
Administering Tests
267(1)
Controlling Cheating
267(1)
Determining the Time Needed to Take a Test
268(1)
Preparing Assessment Items
268(3)
General Guidelines for Preparing for Assessment
269(1)
Classification of Assessment Items
269(1)
Performance Testing Can Be Expensive and Time-Intensive
269(1)
Attaining Content Validity
270(1)
Types of Assessment Items: Descriptions, Examples, and Guidelines for Preparing and Using Them
271(8)
Arrangement
271(1)
Completion Drawing
271(1)
Completion Statement
271(1)
Correction
272(1)
Essay
272(1)
Grouping
273(1)
Identification
274(1)
Matching
274(1)
Multiple Choice
274(2)
Performance
276(1)
Short Explanation
277(1)
True-False
278(1)
Exercise 9.1 Preparing Assessment Items
279(1)
Reporting Student Achievement
280(1)
The Grade Report
280(1)
More About Parental Involvement and Home-School Connections
280(2)
Contacting Parents
280(1)
Meeting Parents
281(1)
Parent Conferences
281(1)
Dealing with an Irate Parent or Guardian
282(1)
Summary
282(1)
Module 9 Posttest
283(3)
Suggested Readings
286(1)
Endnotes
286(2)
Self-Assessment of Teaching and Continued Professional Development
288(21)
Professional Development Through Field Experiences
289(5)
Observation
289(1)
Student Teaching
290(2)
Guidelines for Behaving Professionally During Field Experiences
292(1)
Relationships with Students
293(1)
Finding a Teaching Position
294(1)
Guidelines for Locating a Teaching Position
294(1)
The Professional Career Portfolio
294(1)
Exercise 10.1 Development of My Professional Portfolio
295(4)
Resources for Locating Teaching Vacancies
295(1)
State (and Territorial) Sources for Information About Credential Requirements
296(1)
The Professional Resume
296(2)
The In-Person Interview
298(1)
Professional Development Through Reflection and Self-Assessment
299(1)
Professional Development Through Mentoring
299(1)
Professional Development Through In-Service and Advanced Study
299(1)
Professional Development Through Participation in Professional Organizations
300(1)
Professional Development Through Communications with Other Teachers
300(1)
Professional Development Through Summer and Off-Teaching Work Experience
300(1)
Professional Development Through Micro Peer-Teaching
301(1)
Exercise 10.2 Pulling It All Together---Micro Peer-Teaching IV
301(2)
Exercise 10.2A Form A
303(1)
Exercise 10.2B Form B
304(1)
Exercise 10.2C Form C
305(1)
Summary
305(1)
Module 10 Posttest
306(2)
Suggested Readings
308(1)
Endnotes
308(1)
Glossary 309(8)
Author Index 317(4)
Subject Index 321


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...