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Teaching Science as Inquiry,9780131181656
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Teaching Science as Inquiry

by ; ;
Edition:
11th
ISBN13:

9780131181656

ISBN10:
0131181653
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $135.33
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Summary

Research tells us that an inquiry approach to science teaching motivates and engages every type of student, helping students understand science's relevance to their lives as well as the nature of science itself. But is there a Manageable way for new and experienced teachers to bring inquiry into their science classrooms? Teaching Science as Inquiry models this effective approach to science teaching with a two-part structure: Methods for Teaching Science as Inquiry and Activities for Teaching Science as Inquiry. The Methods portion scaffolds concepts and illustrates instructional models to help readers understand the inquiry approach to teaching. The Activities portion follows the 5-E model (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate), which is a Learning Cycle model introduced in the methods chapters that reflects the NSES Science as Inquiry Standards. Integrating an inquiry approach, science content, teaching methods, standards, and a bank of inquiry activities, Teaching Science as Inquiry demonstrates the manageable way for new and experienced teachers to bring inquiry into the science classroom. bull; bull;Integrated standards coverage in all chapters provides a clear picture of the best ways to let the NSES Standards inform instruction. bull;Each activity is keyed to the NSES Standards, further developing new and experienced teachers' fluency with a standards-based science classroom. bull;Margin notes throughout methods chapters link readers to activities that model science teaching methods and the development of science content. bull;Annenberg videos, fully integrated in the text through reflective cases, ground chapter concepts by illustrating inquiry teaching in classrooms.

Table of Contents

METHODS FOR TEACHING SCIENCE AS INQUIRY
1(1)
``Messing about in Science''
2(2)
Children, Science, and Inquiry
4(32)
Why Should Children Learn Science?
6(4)
Video Case Study: Jennie
10(2)
U.S. Science Education: Where Have We Been, Where Are We Now, Where Are We Going?
12(4)
The ``Alphabet Soup'' Programs
13(1)
Integrating Processes and Content
13(1)
Developing National Science Education Standards
13(1)
No Child Left Behind
14(2)
What Is the Nature of Science?
16(4)
Order and Organization
16(1)
Evidence and Explanations
16(2)
Science Is Dynamic
18(1)
Science in Action
18(1)
Science as a Human Endeavor
19(1)
What Shall We Teach in Science?
20(14)
Scientific Inquiry
20(4)
Scientific Knowledge
24(3)
Scientific Attitudes and Human Values
27(2)
Science and Technology
29(4)
Goals for Elementary and Middle School Science
33(1)
Summary
34(1)
References
34(2)
Processes of Science and Scientific Inquiry
36(32)
Processes of Science
37(1)
Video Case Study: Linda
38(9)
Observing
38(3)
Measuring
41(1)
Classifying
41(1)
Inferring
42(2)
Predicting
44(1)
Experimenting
45(1)
Hypothesizing
46(1)
Incorporating Science Processes in Scientific Investigations
47(18)
Descriptive Investigations
49(3)
Classificatory Inquiries
52(3)
Experimental Investigations
55(10)
Teachers and Children's Inquiry
65(1)
Summary
66(1)
References
66(2)
Learning Science with Understanding
68(30)
How Do Children Learn?
70(9)
A Constructivist Model of Learning
70(1)
The Role of Prior Knowledge
70(3)
Discovery Learning
73(1)
Acquisition Learning
74(4)
Learning with Understanding
78(1)
Children's Alternative Conceptions and Science Learning
79(2)
The Soda Straw: A Persistent Alternative Conception
80(1)
Conceptual Change
81(1)
Learning and Cognitive Development
81(9)
Piaget, Cognitive Development, and Knowledge Construction in Science
82(5)
Developmentally Appropriate Science
87(1)
Vygotsky's Theory of Instruction and Development
87(3)
Video Case Study: Patricia
90(2)
Learning, Development, and Instruction: The Case of the Cartesian Diver
92(3)
Summary
95(1)
References
96(2)
Teaching Science Through Inquiry
98(28)
Essential Features of Inquiry Instruction
99(3)
Learners Are Engaged by Scientific Questions
100(1)
Learners Give Priority to Evidence as They Plan and Conduct Investigations
100(1)
Learners Develop Descriptions, Explanations, and Predictions Using Evidence
101(1)
Learners Connect Evidence and Explanations to Developing Scientific Knowledge
101(1)
Learners Engage in Critical Discourse with Others about Procedures, Evidence, and Explanations
102(1)
Video Case Study: Sarah
102(1)
Teachers: The Key Ingredient in Inquiry Instruction
102(1)
Research on the Effectiveness of Inquiry Instruction
103(2)
Models for Inquiry Instruction
105(12)
Guided Discovery
105(5)
The 5-E Model of Instruction
110(7)
Conceptual Change and the 5-E Model of Inquiry Teaching
117(4)
Identify Alternative Conceptions
120(1)
Promote Dissatisfaction with Alternative Conceptions
120(1)
Introduce Scientific Conceptions
121(1)
Provide for Application of New Conceptions
121(1)
Teaching Science Through Direct Instruction
121(2)
Selecting Instructional Approaches for Teaching Science
123(1)
Summary
123(1)
References
124(2)
Questioning Strategies for Inquiry Teaching
126(28)
Questioning: An Essential Tool for Teachers
128(2)
Closed and Open-Ended Questions
128(2)
Using Questions to Engage Students in Inquiry
130(7)
Creating Motivation and Interest
130(1)
Questioning to Assess Prior Knowledge
131(1)
Questioning to Initiate Inquiry
131(2)
Questioning to Guide Discussion of Observations
133(1)
Questioning to Guide Discussion of Explanations
134(2)
Questioning to Guide Discussions of Applications to New Situations
136(1)
Responding Strategically to Student Ideas
137(1)
Accepting Student Responses
137(1)
Video Case Study: Erien (1)
138(5)
Extending Student Responses
141(1)
Probing Student Responses
142(1)
Develop Your Own Questioning and Responding Strategies
143(5)
Analyzing Inquiry Teaching Behaviors
143(3)
Questioning Strategies in the Classroom: Properties of Air in First Grade
146(2)
Some Considerations in Questioning
148(3)
Increase Your Wait-Time
148(1)
Gradually Fade Your Questioning Support
149(1)
Listen to One Another
150(1)
Consider Cultural Implications of Your Questions
150(1)
Remember, We All Need Strokes!
151(1)
Summary
151(1)
References
151(3)
Assessing Science Learning
154(56)
What Is Assessment?
156(4)
Uses and Users of Assessment Data
156(3)
Diagnostic, Formative, and Summative Assessment
159(1)
Assessment and Inquiry Science
160(5)
What Shall Students Learn in Science?
161(2)
What Assessment Techniques Shall We Use to Determine Where Students Are in Science?
163(2)
Designing a Performance Task
165(1)
Focus
165(1)
Context
165(1)
Directions
165(1)
Scoring Guides
165(1)
Video Case Study: Tom
166(5)
Examples of Science Assessment Items and Tasks
171(35)
Assessing Knowledge of Science Facts, Concepts, Principles, and Procedures
171(6)
Assessing Understanding of Conceptual Knowledge in Science
177(7)
Assessing the Application of Concepts and Principles
184(2)
Assessing the Application of Inquiry Procedures and Science Processes
186(10)
Assessing the Planning and Implementing of Inquiry Procedures in Science
196(3)
Assessment of Science Attitudes
199(2)
Assessing Multiple Objectives in Science
201(3)
Teacher Self-Reflection on Instruction
204(2)
Science Assessment: Putting It All Together
206(1)
Summary
207(1)
References
207(3)
Preparing for Inquiry Instruction
210(34)
Designing Inquiry Science Lessons
212(2)
Selecting Appropriate Science Knowledge
212(1)
Developing Your Science Background
213(1)
Video Case Study: Erien (2)
214(16)
Writing a Science Lesson Plan
216(9)
An Example Lesson Plan on Floating and Sinking
225(5)
Arranging the Science Classroom for Learning
230(6)
Science Classroom Learning Centers
233(2)
Live Animals in the Classroom
235(1)
Science Learning Just Outside Your Classroom
235(1)
Grouping Students for Learning
236(1)
Safety in the Science Classroom
237(1)
Classroom Discipline
238(1)
Implementing Learning Activities
239(2)
Summary
241(1)
References
242(2)
Connecting Science with Other Subjects
244(32)
Connecting Science and Mathematics
246(12)
Quantifying the Real World
247(3)
Using Graphs to Organize and Interpret Data
250(3)
Using Patterns and Relationships
253(1)
Operating on Numerical Data
254(4)
Connecting Science and Literacy
258(4)
Science and Reading
259(3)
Writing in Science
262(1)
Video Case Study: Donna
262(1)
Connecting Science and Social Studies
263(8)
Plan Lessons Around Science/Technology/Society Themes
263(8)
Curriculum Integration
271(2)
Insects as the Theme of an Integrated Curriculum Unit
271(1)
The Environment and Native American Culture as the Theme of an Integrated Unit
271(2)
Summary
273(1)
References
274(2)
Science for All Learners
276(32)
Video Case Study: Jean
278(2)
Students with Special Learning Needs
280(1)
Teachers as Bridge Builders
280(2)
Examining Your Attitude
280(1)
People-First Language
281(1)
Recognizing Students' Abilities
281(1)
The Role and Importance of Friendship
281(1)
Combating Learned Helplessness
281(1)
Involving Parents
282(1)
Common Standards, Common Assessments, Diverse Pathways
282(2)
Assisting All Students to Attain Proficiency in Science
282(2)
Students with Disabilities
284(16)
Making Modifications for Students with Special Learning Needs
285(1)
Science for Students with Learning Disabilities
286(7)
Science for Students with Mental Retardation
293(1)
Science for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders
294(2)
Science for Students with Orthopedic Impairments
296(1)
Science for Students with Visual Impairments
297(1)
Science for Students with Hearing Impairments
298(2)
Science for Gifted and Talented Students
300(2)
Make Real Inclusion a Goal
301(1)
Stimulate Gifted Students by the Way You Teach
301(1)
Provide Opportunities for Leadership
302(1)
Learn with and from Your Gifted and Talented Students
302(1)
Science for Students from Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Backgrounds
302(3)
Limited-English-Proficient Students and Inquiry Science
303(2)
Students from Culturally Diverse Backgrounds and Inquiry Science
305(1)
Fostering the Learning and Acceptance of All Students
305(1)
Summary
306(1)
References
306(2)
Educational Technology and the Science Curriculum
308(2)
Educational Technology
310(1)
Technology Standards
311(1)
Technology Standards and Science Education
311(1)
Learning about Technology in Science Classes
311(3)
Internet Basics
312(1)
Develop Technology Literacy Through Science Classes
313(1)
Learning from Educational Technology in Science Classes
314(6)
Embed Electronically Stored Images into Your Instruction
315(1)
Use Computer Assisted Instruction Packages
316(1)
Use Computer Simulations
317(3)
Learning with Educational Technology in Science Classes
320(6)
Contribute to and Use Computer Databases
321(1)
Use MBLs and CBLs to Collect and Process Data
322(2)
Use Spreadsheets to Organize and Analyze Data
324(1)
Communicate Through Multimedia Presentations
325(1)
Managing Educational Technology in the Science Classroom
326(2)
Schoolwide Computer/Multimedia Center or Lab
326(1)
The One-Computer Classroom
326(1)
More Than One Computer---A Multimedia Arrangement
327(1)
Video Case Study: Dotty
328(4)
Selecting Science Software and Internet Sites
331(1)
Acceptable Use Policies for the Internet
332(1)
Take the Plunge---Join the Information Age
332(1)
Summary
333(1)
References
334
ACTIVITIES FOR TEACHING SCIENCE AS INQUIRY
1(1)
Teaching Inquiry Science Activities
3(13)
When Scientists and Students Inquire
4(1)
Phases of Inquiry Instruction
4(4)
Engagement
4(2)
Exploration
6(1)
Explanation
7(1)
Elaboration
7(1)
Evaluation
7(1)
Characteristics of Inquiry Classrooms
8(3)
Discourse
8(1)
Cooperative Groups
8(2)
Scaffolding
10(1)
Planning for Inquiry Instruction
11(1)
Getting Started with Inquiry Science
11(3)
Using the Science Activities in This Book
14(1)
References
15(1)
Physical Science Activities
16(121)
Properties of Matter
17(26)
How Are Buttons Alike and Different? (K--2)
17(1)
What Are Some Different Ways You Can Group Buttons? (K--2)
18(3)
How Much Water Can Heap Up in a Cup? (2--4)
21(2)
How Many Paper Clips Can You Add to a Cup of Water? (2--4)
23(1)
Can You Get a Paper Clip to ``Float'' on Top of Water? Why Does the Paper Clip Not Sink? (2--4)
23(1)
What Does Soap Do to the Skinlike Effect of Water? (2--4)
24(1)
What Happens to Water Drops on Different Surfaces? (2--4)
25(1)
When the Surfaces Are Slanted, Will Water Drops Run Down Faster on Wax Paper, Plastic Wrap, or Aluminum Foil? (3--5)
26(1)
How Do the Cohesive and Adhesive Bonds of Different Liquids Compare? (2--4)
27(1)
Why Do Several Streams of Water Cohere Into One Stream? (2--4)
28(2)
What Are the Properties of Oobleck? (1--6)
30(2)
What Are the Distinguishing Properties of Common White Powders? (3--6)
32(2)
How Can You Determine the Identity of a Mystery Powder? (3--6)
34(2)
What Do Kites Need to Fly? (1--4)
36(1)
Is Air a Real Material Substance Like Solids and Liquids? (1--4)
37(1)
How Does Air Interact with Water? (1--4)
38(1)
How Can Air Keep Water Out of a Container? (1--4)
39(1)
How Can You Use a Syringe to Feel Air Pressure? (3--5)
40(1)
How Does a Medicine Dropper Work? (3--5)
40(1)
How Does a Soda Straw Work? (3--5)
41(1)
How Can You Push a Soda Straw Through a Potato? (3--5)
42(1)
How Can You Demonstrate That Air Expands When It Is Heated? (1--4)
42(1)
Motion and Forces
43(22)
What Is Friction? How Can Friction Be Reduced? (3--6)
44(2)
What Factors Affect the Equilibrium of an Equal-Arm Balance? (3--6)
46(2)
What Is a Lever? How Could You Use One? (2--6)
48(1)
How Is a Lever Like a Balance? (3--6)
49(2)
What Is an Inclined Plane? How Can You Use It? (3--6)
51(2)
What Is a Movable Pulley, and How Can You Use It? (3--6)
53(1)
How Can a Pulley Arrangement Help You Use a Small Force to Overpower a Large Force? (4--6)
54(2)
What Is Bernoulli's Principle? How Can You Use a Piece of Paper to Investigate It? (4--6)
56(1)
How Can You Use a Piece of Paper in Another Way to Investigate Bernoulli's Principle? (3--6)
57(2)
How Can You Use a Bottle and a Piece of Paper to Investigate Bernoulli's Principle? (3--6)
59(1)
How Can You Use a Funnel and Ping-Pong Ball to Investigate Bernoulli's Principle? (3--6)
60(1)
What Is a Pendulum? (5--8)
61(1)
What Factors Might Affect the Rate of Swing of a Pendulum? (5--8)
62(3)
Sound
65(14)
How Are Sounds Produced? (2--4)
66(1)
What Affects the Pitch and Loudness of a Sound? (2--4)
67(1)
How Is Sound Produced by a Tuning Fork? (2--4)
67(1)
How Is Sound Produced When You Talk or Sing? (2--4)
68(1)
How Is Sound Produced by a Drum? (2--4)
68(1)
How Is Sound Produced by a Banjo? (2--4)
69(1)
How Can You Make a Drinking Straw Flute? (2--4)
70(1)
How Can You Make a Pop-Bottle Pipe Organ? What Affects the Pitch of the Sound Produced by a Pop Bottle? (2--4)
71(2)
Does Sound Travel Through Air, Solids, and Liquids? (2--4)
73(1)
How Is the Movement of Sound Like Waves on Water? (2--4)
74(1)
How Can Sounds Be Heard Better? (2--4)
75(3)
Can Sound Travel Through a String? (2--4)
78(1)
How Can You Make a Demonstration Telephone? (2--4)
78(1)
Temperature and Heat
79(13)
What Makes Things Get Hotter? (K--5)
80(2)
How Can You Heat Up the Sand in a Jar? (3--6)
82(2)
What Are Some Sources of Heat? (K--5)
84(1)
How Does Heat Affect the Dissolving Time of Substances? (3--6)
85(1)
What Affects the Temperature Change of Water Heated by Radiation? (3--6)
86(1)
How Is Heat Transferred Through Convection? (3--6)
87(1)
How Is Heat Transferred Through Conduction? (4--6)
88(2)
What Affects the Final Temperature of a Water Mixture? (3--6)
90(2)
Light
92(18)
How Do We See Things? (1--5)
93(1)
Why Can We See Clearly Through Some Materials and Not Others? (K--2)
94(1)
What Type of Path Does Light Take as It Travels? (1--4)
95(1)
How Are Shadows Formed? (1--4)
96(2)
What Is Refraction? (3--6)
98(2)
What Is a Magnifier? How Does It Work? (3--6)
100(1)
What Do Lenses Do in Cameras? (3--6)
101(3)
What Are Images in Mirrors Like? What Is Meant by Mirror Symmetry? (1--4)
104(1)
How Does Light Reflect from a Mirror? (3--6)
105(1)
Where Are the Images Formed in Reflecting Surfaces? (4--6)
106(2)
What Is White Light? (K--4)
108(1)
How Can You Make a Pinhole Camera? (3--6)
109(1)
Magnetism
110(10)
How Does a Magnet Interact with Different Objects? (1--4)
112(1)
Can Magnets Interact with Objects Through Different Materials? (1--4)
113(2)
What Happens When Two Magnets Interact? (2--4)
115(1)
How Do the Ends (Poles) of Two Magnets Interact with Each Other? (2--6)
116(1)
What Are Magnetic Force Lines? (2--6)
116(1)
How Does a Magnet Interact with the Earth, and What Are North-Seeking and South-Seeking Poles of a Magnet? (2--6)
117(2)
How Can You Make a Magnet? (2--6)
119(1)
Electricity
120(17)
How Can You Demonstrate Static Electric Forces? (3--6)
121(2)
How Can I Demonstrate Positive and Negative Electrical Charges? (2--6)
123(2)
How Can You Construct a Circuit in Which a Bulb Lights? (2--6)
125(2)
What Happens When There Is More Than One Bulb or Battery, or a Motor in a Circuit? (2--6)
127(2)
What Is a Series Circuit? (3--6)
129(1)
What Is a Parallel Circuit? (3--6)
129(2)
What Are Conductors and Nonconductors? (3--6)
131(1)
What Is a Switch and How Does It Work? (2--6)
132(1)
How Do Compass Needles Interact with Current-Carrying Wires? (4--6)
133(1)
What Is an Electromagnet, and How Can You Make One? (3--6)
134(2)
How Can You Increase the Strength of an Electromagnet? (3--6)
136(1)
Life Science Activities
137(82)
Characteristics of Organisms
138(39)
What Is Inside a Bean Pod? (K--4)
139(1)
Where Are Seeds Found? How Are Seeds Alike and Different? (K--2)
140(1)
How Do Seedpods Vary? (K--4)
140(1)
What Are the Properties of Seeds? (K--4)
141(1)
What Does the Inside of a Seed Look Like? (K--4)
142(1)
How Much Water Can a Bean Seed Soak Up? (K--4)
143(1)
What Happens to Seeds When They Germinate? (K--4)
144(2)
What Is the Function of Each Seed Part in the Growth of the Plant? (3--6)
146(1)
What Conditions Are Needed for Seeds to Germinate or Sprout? (3--6)
147(2)
What Seeds Do We Eat? (K--4)
149(2)
What Is a Tree Like? (K--2)
151(1)
How Do the Characteristics of Leaves Vary? (K--2)
151(2)
How Can Some Plants Grow Without Seeds? (K--2)
153(1)
What Are Roots Like? (K--5)
154(1)
What Is the Function of Roots? (K--5)
155(1)
Do Plants Get Water Through Roots or Leaves? (K--5)
155(1)
What Is the Function of a Stem? (K--5)
156(2)
How Much Water Is Enough for Healthy Plant Growth? (K--5)
158(1)
How Much Fertilizer Is Enough for Health Plant Growth? (K--5)
159(1)
What Is the Effect of Light on Plant Growth? (3--5)
160(1)
What Makes Leaves Green? (3--5)
161(1)
What Makes Leaves Green? (Method Two) (3--6)
162(1)
How Does Light Affect Plants? (K--2)
163(1)
What Comes Out of Leaves in Sunlight? (3--5)
164(1)
What Else Comes Out of Leaves in Sunlight? (3--5)
165(2)
What Is the Effect of Gravity on the Growth of Roots and Stems? (K--5)
167(2)
What Stages Do Insects Go Through? (K--5)
169(1)
How Do Ants Live? (K--2)
170(3)
What Do You Know About the Birds Around You? (K--6)
173(1)
What Kinds of Foods Do Different Birds Prefer? (K--6)
174(1)
How Do Birds Interact with Their Surroundings? (3--6)
175(1)
How Can You Find Out More About Birds? (3--6)
175(2)
How Do Bird Bones Differ from Mammal Bones? (3--6)
177(1)
Organisms and Their Environments
177(11)
How Can I Construct an Aquarium Habitat? (1--3)
178(2)
What Can I Observe in an Aquarium? (1--3)
180(1)
What Environmental Factors Can Affect Life in an Aquarium Habitat? (4--6)
181(2)
What Is in Soil? (K--5)
183(1)
What Is an Earthworm Like? (K--5)
184(1)
How Can We Build a Terrarium Environment for Earthworms? (1--3)
184(2)
How Can We Build a Desert Terrarium? (3--5)
186(1)
How Can We Build a Wetland Terrarium? (3--5)
187(1)
Structures and Functions of Human Systems
188(31)
How Does Breathing Change Your Chest Size? (2--4)
189(1)
What Is in Our Breath? (3--6)
190(1)
How Can We Test the Gases in Our Breath? (3--6)
190(2)
What Makes You Breathe Faster? (3--8)
192(1)
How Can We Make a Model of Lungs? (3--8)
193(2)
How Big Are Your Lungs? (3--5)
195(1)
How Does Your Body Cool Itself? (K--5)
196(2)
How Does Our Skin Protect Us? (3--8)
198(2)
How Much Water Is in Our Foods? (5--8)
200(2)
What Is Starch, and How Can We Test for It? (5--8)
202(1)
What Are Fats, and How Do We Test For Them? (5--8)
203(2)
What Is Glucose, and How Do We Test for It? (5--8)
205(3)
How Can You See Which Soda Has More Sugar? (5--8)
208(1)
What Are Proteins, and How Do We Test for Them? (5--8)
209(3)
What Are Minerals, and How Do We Test for Them? (5--8)
212(1)
What Are Vitamins, and How Do We Test for Them? (5--8)
213(2)
How Much of Each Nutrient Does Your Body Need, and How Can You Find Out What Is in Each Food? (5--8)
215(4)
Earth and Space Science Activities
219(1)
Structure of the Earth
219(17)
What Are Rocks and Minerals Like? (2--5)
220(1)
What Is Meant by the Streak of a Mineral and How Can We Test for It? (2--5)
221(1)
How Can Minerals Be Identified by Feel? (2--5)
222(1)
What Is Meant by the Hardness of a Mineral and How Can We Test for It? (2--5)
223(1)
What Is Meant by Luster and How Can It Be Used in Identifying Minerals? (2--5)
223(2)
How Can the Transmission of Light Through a Mineral Be Used to Identify the Mineral? (2--5)
225(1)
What Can the Shape of a Mineral Tell Us? (2--5)
225(1)
What Special Properties Do Different Minerals Have? (2--5)
225(1)
How Can You Identify an Unknown Mineral? (2--5)
226(1)
How Can Salt Crystals Be Grown? (3--6)
227(1)
How Can Sugar Crystals Be Grown? (3--6)
228(1)
How Does the Rate of Cooling During Crystal Formation Affect Crystal Size? (3--6)
229(1)
What Are Stalactites and Stalagmites, and How Are They Formed? (3--6)
230(3)
How Can Living Things Produce Forces that Can Change the Earth's Surface? (K--2)
233(1)
What Is in Soil? (3--6)
234(1)
What Is Core Sampling, and How Can We Use It to Infer Layers in the Earth? (K--5)
235(1)
The Atmosphere, Weather, and Climate of the Earth
236(21)
How Much Water Evaporates from an Open Aquarium? (K--2)
238(1)
Where Does Water Go When It Evaporates? (K--2)
239(1)
How Can You Promote the Evaporation of Water? (K--2)
239(1)
Which Evaporates More Quickly, Water or Rubbing Alcohol? (4--6)
240(1)
How Fast Does Water in a Wet Sponge Evaporate? (3--6)
241(1)
What Variables Affect How Quickly Water Evaporates in a Wet Sponge? (3--6)
242(1)
What Is Condensation? How Does It Occur? (3--6)
243(1)
How Can Evaporation and Condensation Be Used to Desalinate Salt Water? (3--5)
244(1)
What Is the Temperature at Which Condensation Takes Place? (3--6)
245(1)
How Can We Describe the Weather? (K--3)
246(1)
How Does Outside Temperature Change Throughout a Day and from Day to Day? (2--4)
247(2)
How Are Clouds and Fog Formed? (3--6)
249(1)
How Can You Make a Wind Vane, and How Is It Used to Determine Wind Direction? (3--6)
250(2)
How Can You Measure How Fast the Wind Blows? How Does Wind Speed Vary with Location and Time? (3--6)
252(1)
How Can You Measure Air Pressure Changes, and How Do Air Pressure Changes Affect Weather? (3--6)
253(2)
How Can You Measure Relative Humidity and Humidity Changes? (3--6)
255(2)
The Earth's Oceans
257(10)
What Part of the Earth's Surface Is Covered by Oceans? (3--6)
258(1)
What Part of the Earth's Water Is in the Oceans? (3--8)
259(1)
Do Objects Float Differently in Salt Water than in Fresh Water? (4--6)
260(1)
What Affects the Pressure of a Stream of Water? (3--5)
261(1)
What Foods Contain Products from the Ocean? (4--6)
262(2)
What Are Some Effects of Water Pollution? (3--8)
264(2)
How Can We Try to Reverse the Effects of an Oil Spill? (3--8)
266(1)
Viewing the Sky from Earth
267(2)
What Causes Shadows? (K--2)
269(1)
How Can Shadows Be Changed? (K--2)
269(1)
How Do Shadows Caused by the Sun Change During the Day? (K--4)
270(1)
How Can Shadows Tell You When It Is Local Noon? (4--6)
271(2)
Why Is There Day and Night? (2--4)
273(1)
How Does the Appearance of the Moon's Shape Change Over Time? (2--4)
274(1)
Why Does It Appear That There Are Phases of the Moon? (4--6)
275(2)
How Can We Describe Positions of Objects in the Sky? (4--6)
277(3)
How Spread Out Are the Planets in Our Solar System? (3--6)
280(1)
How Do the Planets in Our Solar System Compare in Size? (5--8)
281(1)
How Could You Make a Scale Model of the Earth and Moon? (5--8)
282
APPENDIXES
A Sixty Years of Elementary School Science: A Guided Tour
2(4)
B Science Supplies, Equipment, and Materials Obtainable from Community Sources
6(2)
C Selected Sources of Scientific Supplies, Models, Living Things, Kits, and Software
8(1)
D Noncommercial Sources and Containers for Living Things
9(2)
E Constructing Storage Areas for Supplies and Houses for Living Things
11(3)
F Food Requirements for Various Animals
14(2)
G Safety Suggestions for Elementary and Middle School Inquiry Activities
16(1)
H Measuring Tools, Measuring Skills
17(5)
I Selected Science Education Periodicals for Teachers and Children
22(1)
J Professional Societies for Teachers, Supervisors, and Science Educators
23(1)
K Contemporary Elementary Science Projects and Programs
24
Index 1

Excerpts

THE RAPID ADVANCEof cognitive teaming theories in the past few years has led educators to realize the need for students to be more actively engaged in their own construction of knowledge. This research tells us that an inquiry approach to science teaching motivates and engages every type of student, helping them understand science's relevance to their lives, as well as the nature of science itself. Inquiry is both a way for scientists and students to investigate the world, and a way to teach. In this instructional environment, teachers act as facilitators of teaming, guiding students in asking simple but thoughtful questions about the world and finding ways to engage them in answering their questions. Inquiry incorporates the use of hands-on and process-oriented activities for the benefit of knowledge construction, while building investigation skills and habits of mind in students. Inquiry encourages students to connect their prior knowledge to observations and to use their observations as evidence to increase personal scientific knowledge and explain how the world works. But is there a manageable way for new and experienced teachers to bring inquiry into their science classrooms? Drawing on a solid understanding of inquiry with a teaching framework that builds in accountability for science content learning, and using inquiry-based activities, teachers can create and manage an engaging, productive science classroom. By integrating an inquiry approach, science content, teaching methods, standards, and a bank of inquiry activities, the tenth edition ofTeaching Science as Inquirydemonstrates a manageable way for new and experienced teachers to bring inquiry successfully into the science classroom. The Inquiry Framework In this edition we have taken theNational Science Education Standards(NSES) and the 5-E Learning Cycle model of instruction to create an inquiry framework for science teaching.Teaching Science as Inquirymodels this effective approach to science teaching with a two-part structure.Part I: Methods for Teaching Science as Inquirylays the foundation for teaching standards-based elementary science, scaffolding an understanding of an inquiry lesson model and how to use it to teach science. Part 2: Activities for Teaching Science as Inquiryutilizes the 5-E instructional model, clarified in Part I of the text, as a framework for all inquiry activities. By keying each activity to theNational Science Education Standards,the text further provides new and experienced teachers with a solid foundation for science teaching. National Science Education Standards Many years of work and research in the science education community have provided a coherent, research-based vision for a new era of science education. As a result, theNational Science Education Standards(NSES) were created to coordinate the goals and objectives for science instruction. Throughout this edition, you will have an opportunity to become familiar with theNational Science Education Standardsthrough margin notes and lengthier features quoting from theStandardsdocument, showing theStandards'relationship to chapter content and specifically connecting activities to theStandards.This integrated coverage in all chapters and activities highlights the importance of using theNational Science Education Standardsto inform instruction. 5-E Model TheActivitiesportion of the text follows the 5-E model of instruction, which frames each activity in terms of engaging, exploring, explaining, elaborating, and evaluating. This Learning Cycle model, introduced early in the text, reflects the NSESScience as Inquiry Standards,seamlessly integrating inquiry and theStandardsto create a science teaching framework best suited for engaging students in meaningful science learning while prov


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