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Teaching Through Text : Reading and Writing in the Content Areas,9780801332630
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Teaching Through Text : Reading and Writing in the Content Areas

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780801332630

ISBN10:
080133263X
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

Teaching Through Text provides a broad range of techniques to enhance students' literacy development and learning across the curriculum. McKenna and Robinson focus on describing, illustrating, and applying both teacher-directed and student-centered strategies. Student-centered strategies are illustrated through graphic organizers, concept bridges, and applicable exercises.

Author Biography

Michael C. McKenna, a former middle grades teacher, is now Professor of Reading at Georgia Southern University in Savannah.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
SECTION ONE: Teaching and Learning Through Text 1(72)
The Importance of Literacy in Content Areas
3(14)
Objectives
4(13)
The Meaning of Literacy
4(2)
Four Aspects of Literacy
6(2)
The Implications of Content Literacy
8(3)
Teacher Resistance to Content Literacy
11(1)
Seeing Yourself as a Teacher
12(3)
Summary
15(1)
Getting Involved
16(1)
Literacy Processes
17(15)
Objectives
18(14)
Reading and Writing as Language Processes
18(2)
The Reading Process
20(6)
The Writing Process
26(3)
Making Sense Out of Content
29(1)
Summary
30(1)
Getting Involved
30(2)
Getting to Know Your Students, Your Materials, and Your Teaching
32(23)
Objectives
33(22)
Three Dimensions of Classroom Assessment
33(1)
What is Reading Ability?
34(3)
Levels of Reading Ability
37(2)
Reading Ability and Readability
39(1)
Judging the Match between Students and Materials
40(5)
Judging the Context of Instruction
45(3)
Three Struggling Readers
48(3)
Summary
51(2)
Getting Involoved
53(2)
Global Lesson Planning
55(18)
Objectives
56(17)
Why Plan?
56(1)
Nested Planning
57(2)
Global Plan 1: The Directed Reading Activity (DRA)
59(2)
Global Plan 2: The Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA)
61(2)
DRA versus DR-TA
63(1)
Global Plan 3: K-W-L
64(2)
Global Plan 4: The Explicit Teaching Model
66(4)
Summary
70(2)
Getting Involved
72(1)
SECTION TWO: Prereading Strategies 73(54)
Building Prior Knowledge
75(22)
Objectives
77(20)
Judging Whether Prior Knowledge is Adequate
77(4)
Ways to Add and Activate Background Knowledge
81(14)
Summary
95(1)
Getting Involved
96(1)
Introducing Technical Vocabulary
97(30)
Objectives
98(29)
The Nature of Words
99(1)
The Myth That Words Teach Themselves
100(1)
Formal Definitions
101(1)
Feature Analysis
102(2)
Graphic Organizers
104(14)
List-Group-Label
118(1)
Guided Writing Procedure (GWP)
118(2)
Additional Methods
120(3)
Summary
123(1)
Getting Involved
124(3)
SECTION THREE: Strategies for Guided Reading 127(58)
Making Reading Purposeful
129(23)
Objectives
130(22)
Who Should Set Purposes for Reading?
131(1)
Ways of Setting Purposes
131(18)
Varying and Combining Techniques
149(1)
Summary
149(1)
Getting Involved
150(2)
Reading Guides
152(22)
Objectives
153(21)
Advantages of a Written Guide
153(1)
When Should Reading Guides be Used?
154(1)
Types of Guides
155(10)
Constructing a Reading Guide
165(3)
Computerizing Reading Guides and Units
168(1)
Using Reading Guides
169(3)
Summary
172(1)
Getting Involved
173(1)
Providing Time to Read: When, Where, and How?
174(11)
Objectives
175(10)
Reading Assignments as Homewrok
175(1)
Structuring Units to Allow Reading in Class
176(3)
Reciprocal Teaching
179(4)
Summary
183(1)
Getting Involved
183(2)
SECTION FOUR: Postreading Strategies 185(60)
Effective Questioning
187(27)
Objectives
188(26)
The Purposes of Discussion
188(5)
Planning a Discussion
193(2)
Conduting a Discussion
195(8)
Alternatives to Teacher-Led Discussions
203(5)
Discussion and Recitation: A Second Look
208(1)
Discussion and Writing
209(3)
Summary
212(1)
Getting Involved
213(1)
Reinforcing and Extending Content Knowledge
214(31)
Objectives
216(29)
Drilling Versus Extending
216(1)
Using Literacy to Reinforce and Extend
217(22)
Reinforcing through Direct Instruction
239(2)
Summary
241(1)
Getting Involved
242(3)
SECTION FIVE: More Ways to Facilitate Learning through Text 245(52)
Study Skills: Encouraging Independence in Content Literacy
247(20)
Objectives
248(19)
Responsibility for Teaching Study Skills
249(1)
Note Taking
250(3)
Review and Homework
253(2)
Test Taking
255(3)
Strategies for Independent Reading
258(6)
Summary
264(1)
Getting Involved
265(2)
Student Attitudes: Encouraging Content Literacy
267(17)
Objectives
268(16)
Factors That Affect Motivation
268(4)
Assessing Reading Interests
272(2)
Promoting Content Literacy in Your Classroom
274(8)
Summary
282(1)
Getting Involved
283(1)
Teaching for Diversity
284(13)
Objectives
285(12)
Dimensions of Diversity
286(5)
Meeting the Challenge of Diversity
291(5)
Summary
296(1)
Getting Involved
296(1)
Appendix: Examples of Content Literacy Units 297(14)
Planning an Effective Unit
297(3)
Sample Unit One: Fifth-Grade Social Studies
300(6)
Sample Unit Two: Tenth-Grade Biology
306(5)
References 311(16)
Index 327


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