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Techniques and Guidelines for Social Work Practice,9780205352319
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Techniques and Guidelines for Social Work Practice

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780205352319

ISBN10:
0205352316
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

Unique among textbooks, Techniques and Guidelines for Social Work Practice emphasizes different techniques that social workers need to conduct their practice. Organized to support a generalist practice perspective, this text includes every way in which both direct and indirect intervention activities are a part of the social worker's repertoire. Parts I and II summarize the essential foundation elements of social work practice, while Parts III and IV set out 160 comprehensible techniques and guidelines that can be used by students and new practitioners. The text is widely applicable, as it touches upon everything from cultural competence to macro practice.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
PART I Social Work and the Social Worker 1(52)
The Domain of the Social Work Profession
3(14)
The Social Work Domain
4(7)
Social Work's Purpose
4(5)
Social Work's Focus
9(1)
Social Work's Scope
10(1)
Social Work's Sanction
11(1)
An Overview of Social Work Practice
11(4)
Conclusion
15(1)
Selected Bibliography
16(1)
Merging Person with Profession
17(20)
Selecting Social Work as a Career
17(4)
Social Work as a Life Companion
18(1)
The School-to-Job Transition
18(1)
Earning a Living as a Social Worker
19(2)
Establishing Oneself as a Social Worker
21(5)
Acquiring a Reputation
21(1)
Conflict over Agency Policy
22(1)
Promoting Social Justice
23(2)
Political Involvement
25(1)
The Interplay of One's Personal and Professional Lives
26(3)
Being Changed by Clients
27(1)
Personal Responses to Clients in Need
27(1)
The Social Worker's Family
28(1)
A Fitness Program for the Social Worker
29(5)
Friendships and Community
29(1)
Self-Worth and Self-Image
30(1)
Physical and Emotional Well-Being
30(1)
Intellectual Growth
31(1)
Religion and Spirituality
32(2)
Aritistic Expression
34(1)
Having Fun in Social Work
34(1)
Conclusion
35(1)
Selected Bibliography
36(1)
Merging the Person's Art with the Profession's Science
37(16)
The Social Worker as Artist
37(7)
Compassion and Courage
38(1)
Professional Relationship
38(2)
Creativity
40(1)
Hopefulness and Energy
41(1)
Judgment
41(1)
Personal Values
42(2)
Professional Style
44(1)
The Social Worker as Scientist
44(8)
Knowledge of Social Phenomena
46(1)
Knowledge of Social Conditions and Social Problems
47(1)
Knowledge of the Social Work Profession
48(1)
Knowledge of Social Work Practice
49(3)
Conclusion
52(1)
Selected Bibliography
52(1)
PART II The Building Blocks of Social Work Practice 53(80)
The Roles and Functions Performed by Social Workers
55(13)
Defining Professional Roles
55(12)
The Social Worker as Broker
56(1)
The Social Worker as Advocate
57(1)
The Social Worker as Teacher
58(1)
The Social Worker as Counselor/Clinician
59(1)
The Social Worker as Case Manager
60(2)
The Social Worker as Workload Manager
62(1)
The Social Worker as Staff Developer
63(1)
The Social Worker as Administrator
64(1)
The Social Worker as Social Change Agent
65(1)
The Social Worker as Professional
66(1)
Conclusion
67(1)
Selected Bibliography
67(1)
Guiding Principles for Social Workers
68(14)
Principles Focused on the Social Worker as a Professional Person
68(4)
The Social Worker Should Practice Social Work
68(1)
The Social Worker Should Engage in Conscious Use of Self
69(1)
The Social Worker Should Maintain Professional Objectivity
70(1)
The Social Worker Should Respect Human Diversity
70(1)
The Social Worker Should Challenge Social Injustices
71(1)
The Social Worker Should Seek to Enhance Professional Competence
71(1)
Principles That Guide Practice Activities
72(9)
The Social Worker Should Do No Harm
72(1)
The Social Worker Should Engage in Knowledge-Guided Practice
72(1)
The Social Worker Should Engage in Value-Guided and Ethical Practice
73(1)
The Social Worker Should Be Concerned with the Whole Person
73(1)
The Social Worker Should Serve the Most Vulnerable Members of Society
74(1)
The Social Worker Should Treat the Client with Dignity
74(1)
The Social Worker Should Individualize the Client
75(1)
The Social Worker Should Consider Clients Experts on Their Own Lives
75(1)
The Social Worker Should Lend Vision to the Client
76(1)
The Social Worker Should Build on Client Strengths
76(1)
The Social Worker Should Maximize Client Participation
77(1)
The Social Worker Should Maximize Client Self-Determination
77(1)
The Social Worker Should Help the Client Learn Self-Directed Problem-Solving Skills
78(1)
The Social Worker Should Maximize Client Empowerment
78(1)
The Social Worker Should Protect Client Confidentiality
79(1)
The Social Worker Should Adhere to the Philosophy of Normalization
79(1)
The Social Worker Should Continuously Evaluate the Progress of the Change Process
80(1)
The Social Worker Should Be Accountable to Clients, Agency, Community, and the Social Work Profession
80(1)
Conclusion
81(1)
Selected Bibliography
81(1)
Practice Frameworks for Social Work
82(37)
Requirements of a Practice Framework
82(1)
Guidelines for Selecting a Practice Framework
83(3)
Selected Practice Frameworks
86(32)
Selected Practice Perspectives
86(1)
The Generalist Perspective
86(3)
The General Systems Perspective
89(2)
The Ecosystems Perspective
91(2)
The Strengths Perspective
93(1)
The Ethnic-Sensitive Perspective
94(1)
The Feminist Perspective
95(1)
Selected Practice Theories and Models
96(1)
Practice Based on Psychodynamic Theory
97(1)
Practice Based on Behavioral Theory
98(1)
Practice Based on Cognitive-Behavioral Theory
99(1)
Practice Based on Person-Centered Theory
100(1)
The Interactional Model
101(1)
The Structural Model
102(1)
The Crisis Intervention Model
103(1)
The Task-Centered Model
103(1)
The Solution-Focused Model
104(1)
Practice Based on the Family Therapies
105(2)
The Family Preservation Model (or Home-Based Model)
107(1)
The Clubhouse Model
108(2)
Practice Based on Small-Group Theories
110(1)
Practice Based on the Addiction Model
111(2)
The Self-Help Model
113(1)
Models for Changing Organizations
114(2)
Models for Changing Communities
116(2)
Conclusion
118(1)
Selected Bibliography
118(1)
Facilitating Change through Decision Making
119(14)
Elements of the Planned Change Process
119(3)
The Context of Planned Change
122(1)
Factors Affecting the Client's Need for Change
123(1)
Individual Change
123(1)
Family and Group Change
124(1)
Organizational Change
124(1)
Community Change
124(1)
Identifying the Actors in Planned Change
124(1)
Phases of the Planned Change Process
125(2)
Critical Thinking in Planned Change
127(3)
Decision Making in Planned Change
130(2)
Conclusion
132(1)
Selected Bibliography
132(1)
PART III Techniques Common to All Social Work Practice 133(68)
Basic Communication and Helping Skills
134(47)
Creating an Effective Helping Relationship
136(3)
Verbal Communication Skills
139(4)
Nonverbal Communication Skills
143(2)
Helping Skills
145(13)
The I-Statement
158(1)
Understanding Emotions and Feelings
159(3)
Responding to Defensive Communication
162(4)
Elements of Professional Behavior
166(1)
Making Ethical Decisions
167(6)
Cross-Cultural Helping
173(8)
Basic Skills for Agency Practice
181(20)
Report Writing
182(2)
Letter Writing
184(1)
Effective Telephone Communications
185(2)
Using Information Technology
187(3)
Maintaining Casenotes for Narrative Recording
190(2)
Problem-Oriented Recording (POR) and the SOAP Format
192(3)
Process Recording
195(1)
Managing Time at Work
196(3)
Controlling Workload
199(2)
PART IV Techniques and Guidelines for Phases of the Planned Change Process 201(310)
Intake and Engagement
203(41)
Section A Techniques and Guidelines for Direct Practice
204(2)
The First Telephone Contact
206(1)
The First Face-to-Face Meeting
207(3)
Clarifying the Client's Problem, Concern, or Request
210(2)
Making a Referral
212(4)
Obtaining and Releasing Client Information
216(3)
The In-Home Interview
219(2)
Engaging the Involuntary Client
221(3)
Engaging the Hard-to-Reach Client
224(2)
Responding to the Manipulative Client
226(3)
Responding to the Dangerous Client or Situation
229(3)
Section B Techniques and Guidelines for Indirect Practice
232(1)
Learning about Your Agency
233(2)
Recruiting, Selecting, and Training Staff and Volunteers
235(4)
Learning about Your Community
239(5)
Data Collection and Assessment
244(90)
Section A Techniques and Guidelines for Direct Practice
245(2)
The Social Assessment Report
247(6)
The Dual Perspective
253(2)
Genograms and Ecomapping
255(3)
Social Support Assessment
258(4)
Life History Grid
262(2)
Life Cycle Matrix
264(2)
Identifying Client Strengths
266(3)
Expanding a Client's Vision of Changes That Are Possible
269(3)
Coping Strategies and Ego Defenses
272(5)
Assessing a Client's Role Performance
277(2)
Assessing a Client's Self-Concept
279(3)
Assessing Family Functioning
282(6)
Multiworker Family Assessment Interviews
288(1)
The ABC Model and the Behavior Matrix
289(2)
Using Questionnaires, Checklists, and Vignettes
291(5)
The 4 Ps, 4 Rs, and 4 Ms
296(2)
Assessing a Client's Social Functioning
298(8)
Assessing a Client's Mental Status
306(2)
Identifying Developmental Delays in Young Children
308(3)
The Person-In-Environment (PIE) System
311(2)
Referral for Psychological Testing
313(2)
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)
315(2)
Assessing a Child's Need for Protection
317(5)
Section B Techniques and Guidelines for Indirect Practice
322(1)
Assessing Agency Structure
323(2)
Assessing Human Services Needs
325(1)
Focus Groups
326(2)
Force Field Analysis
328(1)
Community Decision-Making Analysis
329(2)
Social Policy Analysis
331(3)
Planning and Contracting
334(39)
Section A Techniques and Guidelines for Direct Practice
335(2)
Selecting Target Problems and Goals
337(2)
The Problem Search
339(1)
Using Checklists in Goal Selection
340(2)
The Client Needs List
342(1)
Formulating Intervention Objectives
342(4)
Written Service Contracts
346(4)
Making Use of Informal Resources
350(2)
The Small Group as a Resource
352(4)
Section B Techniques and Guidelines for Indirect Practice
356(1)
Establishing and Changing Organizations
357(2)
The Process of Agency Planning
359(3)
Project Planning and Evaluation
362(5)
Planning a Primary Prevention Program
367(2)
Establishing Formal Interagency Collaboration
369(4)
Intervention and Monitoring
373(92)
Section A Techniques and Guidelines for Direct Practice
374(3)
Planning an Interview
377(1)
Information and Advice
378(2)
Encouragement, Reassurance, and Universalization
380(1)
Reinforcement and Related Behavioral Techniques
381(4)
Behavioral Rehearsal
385(1)
Behavioral Contracting
386(2)
Role Reversal
388(1)
Managing Self-Talk
389(4)
Building Self-Esteem
393(2)
The Empty Chair
395(1)
Confrontation and Challenge
396(1)
Reframing
397(2)
Helping Clients Make Difficult Decisions
399(3)
The ``Talking Stick''
402(1)
Homework Assignments
402(1)
Envelope Budgeting
403(1)
Managing Personal Debt
404(3)
Indirect Discussion of Self in Small Groups
407(1)
Programming in Group Work
408(2)
Resolving Interpersonal Conflict
410(2)
The Feelings List
412(1)
The Life Book
413(1)
Client Advocacy
414(2)
Client Empowerment
416(3)
Crisis Cards
419(1)
Section B Techniques and Guidelines for Indirect Practice
420(1)
Working with a Governing or Advisory Board
421(2)
Conducting Effective Staff Meetings
423(1)
Building Teamwork and Cooperation
424(2)
Leading Small-Group Meetings
426(3)
The RISK Technique
429(1)
The Nominal Group Technique (NGT)
430(1)
Chairing a Committee
431(5)
Problem Solving by a Large Group
436(1)
Brainstorming
437(1)
Class Advocacy
438(3)
Teaching and Training
441(2)
Preparing a Budget
443(4)
The 5 Ps of Marketing Human Services
447(2)
Dealing with the Media
449(3)
Fund-Raising for a Human Services Agency
452(4)
Developing Grant Applications
456(5)
Influencing Legislators and Other Decision Makers
461(4)
Evaluation and Termination
465(46)
Section A Techniques and Guidelines for Direct Practice
467(4)
Measuring Change with Individualized Rating Scales
471(3)
Measuring Change with Standardized Rating Scales
474(2)
The Service Plan Outcome Checklist (SPOC)
476(6)
Task Achievement Scaling (TAS)
482(1)
Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS)
483(3)
Single-Subject Designs (SSD)
486(8)
The Client Self-Rating Scale (CSRS)
494(1)
Termination of Service
495(3)
Section B Techniques and Guidelines for Indirect Practice
498(1)
Peer Review
499(2)
Worker Performance Evaluation
501(2)
Program Evaluation
503(2)
The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ)
505(3)
Agency Evaluation
508(3)
PART V Specialized Techniques and Guidelines for Social Work Practice 511(112)
Guidelines for Working with Vulnerable Client Groups
512(61)
The Client Who Is Poor
512(6)
The Client Who Is a Child
518(7)
The Client Who Is an Adolescent
525(3)
The Client Who Is Elderly
528(2)
The Client Who Is in Crisis
530(2)
The Client Who Is a Battered Woman
532(4)
The Client Who Is at Risk of Suicide
536(3)
The Client with Cognitive Delay
539(3)
The Client with Brain Injury
542(2)
The Client with a Serious Physical Disability
544(3)
The Client Who Is Chemically Dependent
547(10)
The Client with Serious Mental Illness
557(4)
The Client on Psychotropic Medication
561(2)
The Client Who Is Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual
563(3)
The Client with an Eating Disorder
566(3)
The Client Experiencing Grief or Loss
569(4)
Techniques for Sustaining Social Work Practice
573(50)
Getting a Social Work Job
574(2)
Developing Self-Awareness
576(5)
Stress Management
581(2)
Coping with Bureaucracy
583(3)
Using Humor in Social Work
586(1)
Dealing with Sexual Misconduct
587(2)
Avoiding Malpractice Suits
589(5)
Testifying in Court
594(2)
Dealing with Managed Care
596(3)
Giving and Receiving Supervision
599(4)
Reading, Writing, and Interpreting Professional Literature
603(12)
Presenting to a Professional Audience
615(2)
Improving the Social Work Image
617(2)
Becoming a Leader
619(4)
Using the Conversion Guide 623(4)
Author Index 627(6)
Subject Index 633


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