9780714648170

Tedder: Quietly in Command

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780714648170

  • ISBN10:

    0714648175

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2004-06-18
  • Publisher: Frank Cass
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Summary

Arthur Tedder became one of the most eminent figures of the Second World War: first as head of Anglo-American air forces in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and North Africa; then as Deputy Supreme Commander to General Eisenhower for the Allied campaign that began in Normandy and ended in Berlin. During those anxious, exhilarating years, he was, as The Times of London wrote, 'the most unstuffy of great commanders, who could be found sitting cross-legged, jacketless, pipe smoldering, answering questions on a desert airstrip.' After the war, promoted to five-star rank and elevated to the peerage as Lord Tedder, he was made Chief of the Air Staff, holding this appointment for longer than anyone since his time: four critical years (from 1946 to 1949) that saw the tragic start of the Cold War and the inspiring achievement of the Berlin Airlift. In 1950, he became Britain's NATO representative in Washington: a year that saw the start of a hot war in Korea that threatened to spread around theglobe. In 'retirement', Tedder served as Chancellor of Cambridge University, Vice-Chairman of the British Broadcasting Corporation's Board of Governors and Chairman of the Standard Motor Company. He also famously produced one of the most valuable memoirs of the Second World War. This book provides the first comprehensive account of a great commander's public career and uses hundreds of family letters to portray a private life, both joyful and tragic.

Author Biography

Vincent Orange is Reader in History at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
viii
Foreword xi
Williamson Murray
Series Editor's Preface xiii
Acknowledgements xvii
PART I: 1890 TO 1914: RISING
A Boy of Philosophical Calm, Artistic and Fanciful: From Glenguin to Croydon, July 1890 to July 1909
3(4)
An Amiable Chap, with Many Interests but Few Achievements: Cambridge, October 1909 to June 1912
7(6)
A Sudden Sense of Absolute Intimacy, Harmony and Understanding: From England to Fiji via Germany, June 1912 to December 1914
13(12)
PART II: 1915 TO 1919: FLYING
Learning the Grammar of Command: From Wyke Regis to Calais, January 1915 to January 1916
25(6)
We Are a Pretty Cosmopolitan Lot: From Reading to Auchel, January to December 1916
31(11)
Unimpressive, a Wet Blanket, Not Much of a Leader?: From the Western Front to Shawbury, January 1917 to May 1918
42(7)
A Paper War on the Edge of a Gentleman's War, in a Vile Place: Egypt and Palestine, May 1918 to March 1919
49(10)
PART III: 1919 TO 1940: CLIMBING
Shaping a Squadron in Peacetime at Home, on the Brink of War Abroad: From Bircham Newton to Constantinople, March 1919 to August 1923
59(11)
Good Stuff Separated from Scallywags for the Air Force: From Greenwich to Andover, September 1923 to December 1931
70(11)
Fathering Air Armament and Organising an Expansion of Flying Training: From Eastchurch to Egypt, January 1932 to October 1936
81(9)
The Finest Strategical Position in the World under the Command of Our Next CAS but Two: Singapore, October 1936 to July 1938
90(13)
Spotting Winners and Advancing Aircraft Production: From London to Harrogate and Back, July 1938 to November 1940
103(18)
PART IV: 1940 TO 1943: COMMANDING IN CAIRO
A Man of Nuts and Bolts, of Pen and Ink, with Strong Hands, Velvet Gloved: Cairo and the Western Desert, December 1940 to June 1941
121(16)
Ending the Bad Old Days before There Was Mutual Understanding and Faith between the Services: Cairo and the Western Desert, June to September 1941
137(17)
Condemned by Churchill, Saved by Freeman and Auchinleck: Cairo and the Western Desert, October 1941 to January 1942
154(17)
Winnie and Joe See Arthur as a Fighter: Cairo and the Western Desert, February to October 1942
171(16)
Seeking an Exciting New Command, Avoiding a Dismal Desk in Whitehall, Suffering a Grievous Loss: From Cairo to Algiers, October 1942 to January 1943
187(18)
PART V: 1943 TO 1944: COMMANDING IN ALGIERS
Torch Bearers and Desert Heroes Jointly Countering the Shibboleth of Pershing: Algeria and Tunisia, January to May 1943
205(15)
Honouring a Man of Cold Courage, Jollying a Suspicious Dutchman: From Algeria to Sicily, April to September 1943
220(14)
An Alarming Avalanche, Another Dardanelles, a New Job: From Algeria to Italy, August 1943 to January 1944
234(15)
PART VI: 1943 TO 1945: COMMANDING UNDER EISENHOWER
A Lousy Organisation, Smearing the RAF's Good Name: Bushy Park and Castle Coombe, December 1943 to May 1944
249(13)
A Great and Noble Undertaking Challenged by a Toy that Would Profoundly Affect both War and Peace: From London to Paris, May to August 1944
262(12)
Aunt Sallies, Red Herrings, and a Patchwork Quilt: From London to Brussels, August to December 1944
274(13)
Painting on a Bicycle and Winning Another Contest with Churchill: From London to Germany via Moscow, December 1944 to April 1945
287(16)
PART VII: 1945 TO 1949: COMMANDING THE ROYAL AIR FORCE
Chief Aunt Sally in the Whirligig of Whitehall: London and Elsewhere, May 1945 to December 1946
303(14)
Avoiding Complete Subservience to Our Essential Ally in Countering the Risk of Atomic War: London and Elsewhere, January 1947 to June 1948
317(14)
Working in a Strange and Secretive Society, Leaving the Whirligig: London and Elsewhere, June 1948 to December 1949
331(18)
PART VIII: 1950 TO 1967: GIVING AND NOT COUNTING THE COST
Providing a Few Drops of Oil and Setting the College Flag Flying: From London to Cambridge via Washington, January 1950 to June 1954
349(14)
A Strange Genius: From London to Pollochar and the End, June 1954 to June 1967
363(15)
Notes 378(32)
Bibliography 410(19)
Index 429

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