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Television Production Handbook

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780534559892

ISBN10:
0534559891
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/12/1999
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $129.00

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This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 8/12/1999.
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Summary

This classic, best-selling text introduces students to the basic skills required in all aspects of television production, including camera and studio equipment and remote location production, all while emphasizing the latest technology, such as HDTV. This text brings in cutting edge developments in the field, while maintaining its name as the reference text for the TV Production course. This is the most current, technically accurate text available and offers the most extensive teaching and learning package. Zettl's TELEVISION PRODUCTION HANDBOOK is the standard for the course.

Table of Contents

Photo Credits xxi(2)
About the Author xxiii(1)
Preface xxiv
CHAPTER 1 The Television Production Process
2(24)
Section 1.1 What Television Production Is All About 4(13)
THE BASIC TELEVISION SYSTEM
4(1)
THE EXPANDED STUDIO AND ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION SYSTEMS
5(3)
System Elements of Studio Production
5(2)
The Studio System in Action
7(1)
System Elements of Field Production
7(1)
PRODUCTION ELEMENTS
8(9)
The Camera
8(2)
Lighting
10(1)
Audio
11(2)
Videotape Recording
13(1)
The Switcher
14(1)
Postproduction Editing
14(1)
Special Effects
15(2)
Section 1.2 Studios, Master Control, and Support Areas 17(9)
THE TELEVISION STUDIO
17(2)
Physical Layout
17(1)
Major Installations
18(1)
THE STUDIO CONTROL ROOM
19(3)
Program Control
20(1)
Image Control
21(1)
Audio Control
21(1)
Lighting Control
21(1)
MASTER CONTROL
22(1)
Program Input
22(1)
Program Storage
23(1)
Program Retrieval
23(1)
STUDIO SUPPORT AREAS
23(3)
Scenery and Properties
23(1)
Makeup and Dressing Rooms
24(2)
CHAPTER 2 Analog and Digital Television
26(14)
Section 2.1 Analog and Digital Television 28(8)
BASIC IMAGE CREATION
28(2)
BASIC COLORS OF THE VIDEO DISPLAY
30(1)
WHAT DIGITAL IS ALL ABOUT
30(2)
Why Digital?
30(1)
The Difference Between Analog and Digital
30(1)
The Process of Digitization
30(2)
BENEFITS OF DIGITAL TELEVISION
32(2)
Quality
32(1)
Computer Compatibility and Flexibility
33(1)
Signal Transport
33(1)
Compression
33(1)
ASPECT RATIO
34(2)
The 4 x 3 Aspect Ratio
34(1)
The 16 x 9 Aspect Ratio
34(2)
Section 2.2 DTV Scanning Systems 36(4)
PROGRESSIVE AND INTERLACED SCANNING
36(1)
The Progressive Scanning System
36(1)
The Interlaced Scanning System
37(1)
DTV SYSTEMS
37(1)
The 480p System
38(1)
The 720p System
38(1)
The 1080i System
38(1)
FLAT-PANEL DISPLAYS
38(2)
Plasma Display Panel
38(1)
Liquid Crystal Display
38(2)
CHAPTER 3 The Television Camera
40(24)
Section 3.1 How Television Cameras Work 42(19)
PARTS OF THE CAMERA
42(1)
FROM LIGHT TO VIDEO SIGNAL
43(2)
The Beam Splitter
44(1)
The Imaging Device
44(1)
THE CAMERA CHAIN
45(1)
The Camera Control Unit
45(1)
The Sync Generator and Power Supply
46(1)
TYPES OF CAMERAS
46(4)
Analog and Digital Cameras
46(1)
Studio Cameras
47(1)
ENG/EFP Cameras and Camcorders
48(1)
Consumer Camcorders
49(1)
ELECTRONIC CHARACTERISTICS
50(5)
Aspect Ratio
50(1)
Resolution
50(2)
Light Sensitivity and Operating Light Level
52(1)
Gain
53(1)
Video Noise and Signal-to-Noise Ratio
54(1)
Image Blur and Electronic Shutter
54(1)
Smear and Moire
54(1)
Contrast
54(1)
OPERATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS
55(6)
Operational Items and Controls: Studio Cameras
55(2)
Operational Items: ENG/EFP Cameras and Camcorders
57(2)
Operational Controls: ENG/EFP Cameras and Camcorders
59(2)
Section 3.2 From Light to Video Image 61(3)
THE CCD PROCESS
61(1)
THE NATURE OF COLOR
62(1)
Color Attributes
62(1)
Color Mixing
62(1)
CHROMINANCE AND LUMINANCE CHANNELS
62(2)
Chrominance Channel
62(1)
Luminance Channel
63(1)
The Encoder
63(1)
CHAPTER 4 Lenses
64(22)
Section 4.1 What Lenses Are 66(12)
TYPES OF ZOOM LENSES
66(3)
Studio and Field Lenses
66(1)
Zoom Range
66(2)
Lens Format
68(1)
OPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF LENSES
69(5)
Focal Length
69(1)
Focus
70(1)
Light Transmission: Iris and f-stop
71(2)
Depth of Field
73(1)
OPERATIONAL CONTROLS
74(4)
Zoom Control
75(1)
Digital Zoom Lens
76(1)
Focus Control
76(2)
Section 4.2 What Lenses See 78(8)
HOW LENSES SEE THE WORLD
78(8)
The Wide-Angle Lens
78(3)
The Normal Lens
81(1)
The Narrow-Angle, or Telephoto, Lens
82(4)
CHAPTER 5 Camera Mounting Equipment
86(16)
Section 5.1 Standard Camera Mounts and Movements 88(9)
BASIC CAMERA MOUNTS
88(4)
The Handheld and Shoulder-Mounted Camera
88(1)
The Monopod and Tripod
89(1)
The Studio Pedestal
90(2)
CAMERA MOUNTING (PAN-AND-TILT) HEADS
92(2)
Fluid Heads
92(1)
Cam Heads
93(1)
Plate and Wedge Mount
93(1)
CAMERA MOVEMENTS
94(3)
Section 5.2 Special Camera Mounts 97(5)
SPECIAL MOUNTING DEVICES
97(3)
High Hat
97(1)
Bean Bag
97(1)
Steadicam
98(1)
Short and Long Jibs
98(1)
Studio Crane
99(1)
ROBOT PEDESTALS AND MOUNTING HEADS
100(2)
CHAPTER 6 Camera Operation and Picture Composition
102(24)
Section 6.1 Working the Camera 104(9)
WORKING THE CAMCORDER AND EFP CAMERA
104(5)
Some Basic Camera "Don'ts"
105(1)
Before the Shoot
105(1)
During the Shoot
106(3)
After the Shoot
109(1)
WORKING THE STUDIO CAMERA
109(4)
Before the Show
110(1)
During the Show
110(2)
After the Show
112(1)
Section 6.2 Framing Effective Shots 113(13)
SCREEN SIZE AND FIELD OF VIEW
113(2)
Screen Size
114(1)
Field of View
114(1)
FRAMING A SHOT
115(7)
Dealing With Height and Width
115(2)
Close-ups
117(1)
Headroom
118(1)
Noseroom and Leadroom
118(1)
Closure
119(3)
DEPTH
122(1)
SCREEN MOTION
123(3)
CHAPTER 7 Lighting
126(32)
Section 7.1 Lighting Instruments and Lighting Controls 128(23)
STUDIO LIGHTING INSTRUMENTS
128(6)
Spotlights
128(3)
Floodlights
131(3)
FIELD LIGHTING INSTRUMENTS
134(5)
Spotlights
134(3)
Floodlights
137(1)
Handheld Lights
138(1)
LIGHTING CONTROL EQUIPMENT
139(9)
Mounting Devices
139(4)
Directional Controls
143(1)
Intensity Controls: Diffusers and Reflectors
144(1)
Intensity Controls: Electronic Dimmers
145(3)
COLOR TEMPERATURE
148(3)
How to Control Color Temperature
149(2)
Section 7.2 Light Intensity, Lamps, and Color Media 151(7)
LIGHT INTENSITY
151(2)
Lux and Foot-candles
151(1)
Incident Light
152(1)
Reflected Light
152(1)
CALCULATING LIGHT INTENSITY
153(1)
OPERATING LIGHT LEVEL: BASELIGHT
153(1)
Baselight Levels
154(1)
TYPES OF LAMPS
154(1)
Incandescent
155(1)
Quartz, or Tungsten-Halogen
155(1)
HMI
155(1)
Fluorescent
155(1)
COLOR MEDIA
155(3)
How to Use Color Media
155(1)
Mixing Color Gels
155(3)
CHAPTER 8 Techniques of Television Lighting
158(32)
Section 8.1 Lighting in the Studio 160(18)
TYPES OF LIGHT
160(1)
MAIN LIGHT SOURCES
161(4)
Types of Lighting Instruments
161(1)
Functions of Main Light Sources
161(4)
THE PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINCIPLE, OR TRIANGLE LIGHTING
165(1)
SPECIFIC LIGHTING TECHNIQUES
166(6)
Continuous-Action Lighting
166(2)
Large-Area Lighting
168(1)
Cameo Lighting
168(1)
Silhouette Lighting
169(1)
Chroma-Key Area Lighting
169(1)
Controlling Eye and Boom Shadows
170(2)
CONTRAST
172(1)
Contrast Ratio
172(1)
Shading
172(1)
Auto-Iris
173(1)
Measuring Contrast
173(1)
Limiting Contrast
173(1)
BALANCING INTENSITIES
173(2)
Key-to-Back-Light Ratio
174(1)
Key-to-Fill-Light Ratio
174(1)
THE LIGHT PLOT
175(1)
OPERATION OF STUDIO LIGHTS
176(2)
Safety
176(1)
Preserving Lamps and Power
176(1)
Using a Studio Monitor
176(2)
Section 8.2 Lighting in the Field 178(12)
ENG LIGHTING
178(5)
Shooting in Outdoor Light
179(1)
Shooting at Night
180(1)
Shooting in Indoor Light
181(2)
EFP LIGHTING
183(7)
Safety
184(1)
Power Supply
184(1)
Location Survey
184(2)
Lighting Setup
186(4)
CHAPTER 9 Audio: Sound Pickup
190(34)
Section 9.1 How Microphones Hear 192(21)
ELECTRONIC CHARACTERISTICS OF MICROPHONES
192(3)
Sound-Generating Element
192(1)
Pickup Patterns
193(2)
Special Microphone Features
195(1)
OPERATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MICROPHONES
195(18)
Lavaliere Microphones
195(3)
Hand Microphones
198(2)
Boom Microphones
200(4)
Headset Microphones
204(1)
Wireless Microphones
204(2)
Desk Microphones
206(2)
Stand Microphones
208(1)
Hanging Microphones
209(1)
Hidden Microphones
210(1)
Long-distance Microphones
211(2)
Section 9.2 How Microphones Work 213(11)
SOUND-GENERATING ELEMENTS
213(1)
Dynamic Microphones
213(1)
Condenser Microphones
214(1)
Ribbon Microphones
214(1)
Sound Quality
214(1)
SPECIAL MICROPHONE FEATURES
214(4)
Impedance
214(4)
Frequency Response
218(1)
Balanced and Unbalanced Mics and Cables, and Audio Connectors
218(1)
MIC SETUPS FOR MUSIC PICKUP
218(1)
Microphone Setup for Singer and Acoustic Guitar
218(1)
Microphone Setup for Singer and Piano
219(1)
Microphone Setup for Small Rock Group and Direct Insertion
219(1)
MICROPHONE USE SPECIFIC TO ENG/EFP
219(2)
MICROPHONE USE SPECIFIC TO THE STUDIO
221(3)
CHAPTER 10 Audio: Sound Control
224(26)
Section 10.1 Sound Controls and How to Use Them 226(15)
AUDIO CONTROL AREAS: STUDIO
226(2)
Audio Control Booth
226(1)
Audio Production Room
227(1)
AUDIO PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT: STUDIO
228(11)
Audio Console
228(4)
Patchbay
232(2)
Audio Recording Systems
234(1)
Analog Recording Systems
234(1)
Digital Recording Systems
235(3)
Audio/Video Postproduction
238(1)
AUDIO PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT: FIELD
239(2)
Mixer
239(2)
Section 10.2 Mixing and Sound Aesthetics 241(9)
BASIC AUDIO OPERATION
241(2)
Volume Control
241(2)
LIVE AND POSTPRODUCTION MIXING
243(3)
Live Studio Mixing
243(1)
Live Mixing in ENG/EFP
244(1)
Postproduction Mixing
245(1)
Controlling Sound Quality
245(1)
AESTHETIC FACTORS
246(4)
Environment
246(1)
Figure-ground
246(1)
Perspective
246(1)
Continuity
247(1)
Energy
247(1)
Surround Sound
247(3)
CHAPTER 11 Switching, or Instantaneous Editing
250(16)
Section 11.1 How Switchers Work 252(10)
BASIC SWITCHER FUNCTIONS
252(1)
SIMPLE SWITCHER LAYOUT
253(3)
Program Bus
253(1)
Mix Buses
253(1)
Preview Bus
254(1)
Effects Buses
254(1)
Multifunction Switchers
254(2)
BASIC SWITCHER OPERATION
256(6)
Cut or Take
256(2)
Dissolve
258(1)
Super
259(1)
Fade
259(1)
Additional Special-Effects Controls
259(3)
Section 11.2 What Switchers Do 262(4)
SWITCHER TYPES AND FUNCTIONS
262(2)
Production Switchers
262(1)
Postproduction Switchers
263(1)
Master Control Switchers
263(1)
Routing Switchers
264(1)
ELECTRONIC DESIGNS
264(2)
Composite and Component Switchers
264(1)
Analog and Digital Switchers
264(1)
Audio-Follow-Video Switchers
265(1)
CHAPTER 12 Video-Recording and Storage Systems
266(28)
Section 12.1 How Video Recording Works 268(15)
TAPE-AND DISK-BASED RECORDING SYSTEMS
268(3)
Analog and Digital Systems
268(1)
Linear and Nonlinear Systems
269(1)
Composite and Component Systems
269(1)
Compression
270(1)
TAPE-BASED RECORDING AND STORAGE SYSTEMS
271(9)
How Videotape Recording Works
271(2)
Operational Controls and Electronic Features
273(2)
Major Analog Videotape Recorders
275(2)
Major Digital Videotape Recorders
277(3)
DISK-BASED RECORDING AND STORAGE SYSTEMS
280(3)
Hard Disk Systems
280(1)
Read/Write Optical Discs
281(1)
Data Transfer
281(2)
Section 12.2 How Video Recording Is Done 283(11)
USES OF VIDEO RECORDING AND STORAGE
283(1)
Building a Show
283(1)
Time Delay
284(1)
Program Duplication and Distribution
284(1)
Record Protection and Reference
284(1)
OPERATIONAL VIDEO-RECORDING SYSTEMS
284(2)
Quality Choice
284(1)
Operational Video Recorder Systems
284(2)
VIDEO-RECORDING PRODUCTION FACTORS
286(8)
Preproduction
286(2)
Production
288(6)
CHAPTER 13 Postproduction Editing
294(38)
Section 13.1 How Postproduction Editing Works 296(22)
EDITING MODES: OFF-AND ON-LINE
297(1)
BASIC EDITING SYSTEMS
297(1)
Linear Systems
297(1)
Nonlinear Systems
297(1)
Editing Principle
298(1)
LINEAR EDITING SYSTEMS
298(4)
Single-Source System
298(1)
Expanded Single-Source System
299(2)
Multiple-Source Systems
301(1)
LINEAR EDITING FEATURES AND TECHNIQUES
302(1)
Assemble and Insert Editing
302(1)
CONTROL TRACK AND TIME CODE EDITING
303(3)
Control Track, or Pulse-Count, Editing
304(1)
Time Code Editing
305(1)
AB ROLLING AND AB-ROLL EDITING
306(2)
AB Rolling
306(1)
AB-Roll Editing
307(1)
NONLINEAR EDITING SYSTEMS
308(1)
NONLINEAR EDITING FEATURES AND TECHNIQUES
309(1)
Digitizing Information
309(1)
Compression
309(1)
Storing Information
309(1)
Juxtaposing and Rearranging Video and Audio Files
309(1)
PREEDITING PHASES
310(8)
Shooting Phase
310(1)
Review Phase
311(3)
Decision-Making Phase
314(1)
Operational Phase
315(3)
Section 13.2 Making Editing Decisions 318(14)
EDITING FUNCTIONS
318(1)
Combine
318(1)
Trim
319(1)
Correct
319(1)
Build
319(1)
BASIC TRANSITION DEVICES
319(1)
The Cut
319(1)
The Dissolve
320(1)
The Wipe
320(1)
The Fade
320(1)
MAJOR EDITING PRINCIPLES
320(12)
Continuity Editing
322(6)
Complexity Editing
328(1)
Context
328(1)
Ethics
329(3)
CHAPTER 14 Visual Effects
332(22)
Section 14.1 Electronic Effects and How to Use Them 334(15)
STANDARD ANALOG VIDEO EFFECTS
334(7)
Superimposition
334(1)
Key
335(2)
Chroma Key
337(2)
Wipe
339(2)
DIGITAL VIDEO EFFECTS
341(8)
Computer-Manipulated Effects
341(1)
Image Size, Shape, Light, and Color
342(2)
Motion
344(2)
Multi-Images
346(1)
Computer-Generated Effects
347(2)
Section 14.2 Nonelectronic Effects and How to Use Them 349(5)
OPTICAL EFFECTS
350(2)
Television Gobos
350(1)
Reflections
350(1)
Star Filter
351(1)
Diffusion Filters
351(1)
Defocus
352(1)
MECHANICAL EFFECTS
352(2)
Rain
352(1)
Snow
352(1)
Fog
352(1)
Wind
352(1)
Smoke
353(1)
Fire
353(1)
Lightning
353(1)
Explosions
353(1)
CHAPTER 15 Design
354(28)
Section 15.1 Designing and Using Television Graphics 356(14)
SPECIFICATIONS OF TELEVISION GRAPHICS
356(9)
Aspect Ratio
357(1)
Scanning and Essential Areas
357(1)
Out-of-Aspect-Ratio Graphics and Moving Images
358(3)
Information Density and Readability
361(1)
Color
362(3)
Style
365(1)
GRAPHICS EQUIPMENT
365(5)
Character Generator
365(1)
Graphics Generator
366(4)
Section 15.2 Scenery and Props 370(12)
TELEVISION SCENERY
370(5)
Standard Set Units
370(2)
Hanging Units
372(1)
Platforms and Wagons
373(1)
Set Pieces
374(1)
PROPERTIES AND SET DRESSINGS
375(1)
Stage Props
375(1)
Set Dressings
375(1)
Hand Properties
376(1)
Prop List
376(1)
ELEMENTS OF SCENE DESIGN
376(6)
The Floor Plan
377(2)
Set Backgrounds and Platforms
379(1)
Studio Floor Treatments
379(3)
CHAPTER 16 Production People
382(26)
Section 16.1 What Production People Do 384(19)
PRODUCTION (NONTECHNICAL) PERSONNEL
384(2)
TECHNICAL PERSONNEL AND CREW
386(1)
NEWS PRODUCTION PERSONNEL
387(2)
TELEVISION TALENT
389(1)
PERFORMANCE TECHNIQUES
389(10)
Performer and Camera
390(1)
Performer and Audio
391(1)
Performer and Timing
392(1)
Performer and Postproduction
392(1)
Floor Manager's Cues
392(5)
Prompting Devices
397(2)
ACTING TECHNIQUES
399(2)
Audience
399(1)
Blocking
400(1)
Memorizing Lines
400(1)
Timing
400(1)
The Actor and Postproduction
400(1)
The Director/Actor Relationship
401(1)
AUDITIONS
401(2)
Section 16.2 How to Do Makeup and What to Wear 403(5)
MAKEUP
403(2)
Technical Requirements
404(1)
Materials
404(1)
Techniques
405(1)
CLOTHING AND COSTUMING
405(3)
Clothing
405(1)
Costuming
406(2)
CHAPTER 17 Producing
408(22)
Section 17.1 What Producing Is All About 410(14)
PREPRODUCTION PLANNING: FROM IDEA TO SCRIPT
410(9)
Program Ideas
411(1)
Production Models
412(1)
Writing the Program Proposal
413(2)
Preparing a Budget
415(4)
Presenting the Proposal
419(1)
Writing the Script
419(1)
PREPRODUCTION PLANNING: COORDINATION
419(3)
People
419(1)
Facilities Request
420(1)
Schedules
421(1)
Permits and Clearances
421(1)
Publicity and Promotion
421(1)
PRODUCTION: HOST AND CRITICAL OBSERVATION
422(1)
Playing Host
422(1)
Watching the Production Flow
422(1)
Evaluating the Production
422(1)
POSTPRODUCTION ACTIVITIES
422(2)
Postproduction Editing
422(1)
Evaluation and Feedback
422(1)
Recordkeeping
423(1)
Section 17.2 Dealing With Schedules, Legal Matters, and Ratings 424(6)
PRODUCTION SCHEDULE
424(1)
INFORMATION RESOURCES
425(1)
PROGRAM TYPES
426(1)
UNIONS AND LEGAL MATTERS
426(1)
Unions
426(1)
Copyrights and Clearances
426(1)
Other Legal Considerations
427(1)
AUDIENCE AND RATINGS
427(3)
Target Audience
427(1)
Ratings and Share
428(2)
CHAPTER 18 The Director in Preproduction
430(34)
Section 18.1 How a Director Prepares 432(18)
THE DIRECTOR'S ROLES
432(1)
Director as Artist
432(1)
Director as Psychologist
433(1)
Director as Technical Adviser
433(1)
Director as Coordinator
433(1)
PREPRODUCTION ACTIVITIES
433(13)
Process Message
434(1)
Production Method
434(1)
Production Team and Communication
434(1)
Scheduling
434(1)
Script Formats
434(2)
Script Marking
436(9)
Floor Plan and Location Sketch
445(1)
Facilities Request
446(1)
SUPPORT STAFF
446(4)
Floor Manager
446(2)
Assistant, or Associate, Director
448(1)
Production Assistant
449(1)
Section 18.2 Moving from Script to Screen 450(14)
VISUALIZATION AND SEQUENCING
450(9)
Formulating the Process Message
451(1)
Medium Requirements
451(6)
Interpreting the Floor Plan and Location Sketch
457(2)
SCRIPT ANALYSIS
459(5)
Locking-In Point and Translation
459(1)
The Storyboard
460(4)
CHAPTER 19 The Director in Production and Postproduction
464(28)
Section 19.1 Multicamera Studio Directing 466(21)
THE DIRECTOR'S TERMINOLOGY
466(1)
MULTICAMERA STUDIO DIRECTING
467(15)
Directing from the Control Room
470(3)
Rehearsals
473(5)
Time Line
478(2)
Directing the Show
480(2)
CONTROLLING CLOCK TIME
482(2)
Schedule Time and Running Time
483(1)
Clock Back-Timing and Front-Timing
483(1)
Converting Frames into Clock Time
484(1)
CONTROLLING SUBJECTIVE TIME
484(1)
STUDIO INTERCOM SYSTEMS
484(3)
Section 19.2 Single-Camera Directing 487(5)
SINGLE-CAMERA DIRECTING PROCEDURES
487(3)
Visualization
487(1)
Script Breakdown
488(1)
Rehearsals
488(1)
Videotaping
488(2)
POSTPRODUCTION ACTIVITIES
490(2)
CHAPTER 20 Field Production and Big Remotes
492(38)
Section 20.1 ENG, EFP, and Big Remotes 494(17)
ELECTRONIC NEWS GATHERING
495(1)
ENG Production Features
495(1)
SNG Production Features
496(1)
ELECTRONIC FIELD PRODUCTION
496(4)
Preproduction
497(1)
Production: Equipment Check
497(2)
Production: Setup
499(1)
Production: Rehearsals
499(1)
Production: Videotaping
500(1)
Production: Strike and Equipment Check
500(1)
Postproduction
500(1)
BIG REMOTES
500(11)
Preproduction: The Remote Survey
501(2)
Production: Equipment Setup and Operation
503(5)
Production: Floor Manager and Talent Procedures
508(3)
Section 20.2 Covering Major Events 511(19)
SPORTS REMOTES
511(7)
LOCATION SKETCH AND REMOTE SETUPS
518(4)
Reading Location Sketches
518(3)
Production Requirements for Public Hearing (Indoor Remote)
521(1)
Production Requirements for Parade (Outdoor Remote)
521(1)
COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
522(2)
ENG Communication Systems
524(1)
EFP Communication Systems
524(1)
Big-Remote Communication Systems
524(1)
SIGNAL TRANSPORT
524(6)
Microwave Transmission
524(2)
Communication Satellites: Frequencies, Uplinks, and Downlinks
526(1)
Cable Distribution
527(3)
Epilogue 530(1)
Glossary 531(23)
Selected Reading 554(2)
Index 556


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