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Television Production Handbook

by
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780534647278

ISBN10:
0534647278
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
7/12/2005
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning
List Price: $317.33

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Summary

This classic, best-selling text introduces students to the basic skills required in all aspects of television production, including camera and studio, field equipment and production, and multicamera directing, at the same time emphasizing the latest production techniques and technology, such as audio workstations, non-linear editing, and HDV (High Definition Video). TELEVISION PRODUCTION HANDBOOK introduces cutting-edge developments in the field, while maintaining its reputation as the standard for the Television Production course. Presented in full-color for the first time, this is the most current, technically accurate reference text available, and it offers the most extensive teaching and learning package for the course.

Table of Contents

Photo Credits xxiii
About the Author xxv
Preface xxvi
The Television Production Process
2(24)
What Television Production Is All About
4(14)
Basic Television System
4(1)
Expanded Studio and Electronic Field Production Systems
4(1)
System Elements of Studio Production
4(1)
Studio System in Action
5(2)
System Elements of Field Production
7(1)
Production Elements
8(1)
Camera
8(1)
Lighting
9(1)
Audio
10(2)
Switching
12(1)
Videotape Recording
13(1)
Tapeless Systems
14(1)
Postproduction Editing
14(2)
Special Effects
16(2)
Studios, Master Control, and Support Areas
18(8)
Television Studio
18(1)
Physical Layout
18(1)
Major Installations
19(1)
Studio Control Room
20(1)
Program Control
21(1)
Switching
22(1)
Audio Control
22(1)
Lighting Control
22(1)
Video Control
23(1)
Master Control
23(1)
Program Input
23(1)
Program Storage
23(1)
Program Retrieval
24(1)
Studio Support Areas
24(1)
Scenery and Properties
24(1)
Makeup and Dressing Rooms
25(1)
Analog and Digital Television
26(14)
Analog and Digital Television
28(8)
Basic Image Creation
28(1)
Basic Colors of the Video Display
28(1)
What Digital Is All About
28(2)
Why Digital?
30(1)
Difference Between Analog and Digital
30(1)
Digitization Process
30(2)
Benefits of Digital Television
32(1)
Quality
32(1)
Computer Compatibility and Flexibility
33(1)
Signal Transport
33(1)
Compression
34(1)
Aspect Ratio
34(2)
Scanning Systems
36(4)
Interlaced and Progressive Scanning
36(1)
Interlaced Scanning System
36(1)
Progressive Scanning System
36(1)
DTV Systems
37(1)
480p System
37(1)
720p System
37(1)
1080i System
38(1)
Flat-Panel Displays
38(1)
Plasma Display Panel
38(1)
Liquid Crystal Display
38(2)
The Television Camera
40(28)
How Television Cameras Work
42(21)
Parts of the Camera
42(1)
From Light to Video Signal
42(1)
Beam Splitter
42(1)
Imaging Device
43(2)
Camera Chain
45(1)
Camera Control Unit
45(1)
Sync Generator and Power Supply
46(1)
Types of Cameras
46(1)
Analog Versus Digital Cameras
46(1)
Studio Cameras
47(1)
ENG/EFP Cameras and Camcorders
48(1)
Consumer Camcorders
48(2)
Prosumer Camcorders
50(1)
Electronic Characteristics
50(1)
Aspect Ratio
51(1)
White Balance
51(1)
Resolution
52(3)
Operating Light Level
55(1)
Gain
55(1)
Video Noise and Signal-to-noise Ratio
56(1)
Image Blur and Electronic Shutter
56(1)
Smear and Moire
56(1)
Contrast
57(1)
Shading
57(1)
Operational Characteristics
57(1)
Operational Items and Controls: Studio Cameras
57(2)
Operational Items: ENG/EFP Cameras and Camcorders
59(3)
External Operational Controls: ENG/EFP Cameras and CamCorders
62(1)
From Light to Video Image
63(5)
CED Process
63(1)
Nature of Color
64(1)
Color Attributes
64(1)
Color Mixing
64(1)
Chrominance and Luminance Channels
65(1)
Chrominance Channel
65(1)
Luminance Channel
65(1)
Encoder
66(1)
Electronic Cinema
66(2)
Lenses
68(20)
What Lenses Are
70(12)
Types of Zoom Lenses
70(1)
Studio and Field Lenses
70(1)
Zoom Range
70(2)
Lens Format
72(1)
Optical Characteristics of Lenses
72(1)
Focal Length
73(1)
Focus
74(1)
Light Transmission: Iris, Aperture, and f-stop
75(1)
Depth of Field
76(2)
Operational Controls
78(1)
Zoom Control
78(2)
Digital Zoom Lens
80(1)
Focus Control
80(2)
What Lenses See
82(6)
How Lenses See the World
82(1)
Wide-angle Lens
82(2)
Normal Lens
84(1)
Narrow-angle, or Telephoto, Lens
85(3)
Camera Mounting Equipment
88(16)
Standard Camera Mounts and Movements
90(8)
Basic Camera Mounts
90(1)
Handheld and Shoulder-mounted Camera
90(1)
Monopod and Tripod
90(2)
Studio Pedestal
92(2)
Camera Mounting (Pan-And-Tilt) Heads
94(1)
Fluid Heads
94(1)
Cam Heads
95(1)
Plate and Wedge Mount
95(1)
Camera Movements
95(3)
Special Camera Mounts
98(6)
Special Mounting Devices
98(1)
High Hat
98(1)
Beanbag and Other Car Mounts
98(1)
Steadicam
98(2)
Short and Long Jibs
100(1)
Studio Crane
100(1)
Robotic Camera Mounts
100(1)
Robotic Pedestal
101(1)
Stationary Robotic Camera Mount
102(1)
Rail System
102(2)
Camera Operation and Picture Composition
104(22)
Working the Camera
106(9)
Working the Camcorder and the EFP Camera
106(1)
Some Basic Camera ``Dont's''
106(1)
Before the Shoot
107(1)
During the Shoot
108(3)
After the Shoot
111(1)
Working the Studio Camera
112(1)
Before the Show
112(1)
During the Show
113(1)
After the Show
114(1)
Framing Effective Shots
115(11)
Screen Size and Field of View
115(1)
Screen Size
115(1)
Field of View
115(1)
Framing a Shot: Standard TV and HDTV Aspect Ratios
116(1)
Dealing with Height and Width
116(1)
Framing Close-ups
117(1)
Headroom
118(1)
Noseroom and Leadroom
119(1)
Closure
120(3)
Depth
123(1)
Screen Motion
123(3)
Lighting
126(30)
Lighting Instruments and Lighting Controls
128(22)
Studio Lighting Instruments
128(1)
Spotlights
128(2)
Floodlights
130(3)
Field Lighting Instruments
133(1)
Portable Spotlights
133(3)
Portable Floodlights
136(2)
Diffusing Portable Spotlights
138(1)
Camera Lights
139(1)
Lighting Control Equipment
140(1)
Mounting Devices
140(4)
Directional Controls
144(2)
Intensity Controls: Instrument Size, Distance, and Beam
146(1)
Intensity Controls: Electronic Dimmers
147(3)
Light Intensity, Lamps, and Color Media
150(6)
Light Intensity
150(1)
Foot-candles and Lux
150(1)
Incident Light
150(1)
Reflected Light
151(1)
Calculating Light Intensity
151(1)
Operating Light Level: Baselight
152(1)
Baselight Levels
152(1)
Types of Lamps
153(1)
Incandescent
153(1)
Fluorescent
153(1)
HMI
153(1)
Color Media
153(1)
How to Use Color Media
154(1)
Mixing Color Gels
154(2)
Techniques of Television Lighting
156(32)
Lighting in the Studio
158(20)
Quality of Light
158(1)
Directional Light and Diffused Light
158(1)
Color Temperature
158(1)
How to Control Color Temperature
159(1)
Lighting Functions
160(1)
Terminology
161(1)
Specific Functions of Main Light Sources
161(4)
Specific Lighting Techniques
165(1)
Flat Lighting
165(1)
Continuous-action Lighting
166(1)
Large-area Lighting
167(1)
High-contrast Lighting
167(2)
Cameo Lighting
169(1)
Silhouette Lighting
170(1)
Chroma-key Area Lighting
170(1)
Controlling Eye and Boom Shadows
171(1)
Contrast
172(1)
Contrast Ratio
173(1)
Measuring Contrast
173(1)
Controlling Contrast
173(1)
Balancing Light Intensities
174(1)
Key-to-back-light Ratio
174(1)
Key-to-fill-light Ratio
174(1)
Light Plot
175(1)
Operation of Studio Lights
176(1)
Safety
176(1)
Preserving Lamps and Power
176(1)
Using a Studio Monitor
176(2)
Lighting in the Field
178(10)
Safety
178(1)
Electric Shock
178(1)
Cables
178(1)
Fire Hazard
178(1)
ENG/EFP Lighting
178(1)
Shooting in Bright Sunlight
179(1)
Shooting in Overcast Daylight
180(1)
Shooting in Indoor Light
180(4)
Shooting at Night
184(1)
Location Survey
184(1)
Power Supply
185(3)
Audio: Sound Pickup
188(30)
How Microphones Hear
190(19)
Electronic Characteristics of Microphones
190(1)
Sound-generating Elements
190(1)
Pickup Patterns
191(1)
Microphone Features
192(1)
Operational Characteristics of Microphones
193(1)
Lavaliere Microphones
193(2)
Hand Microphones
195(2)
Boom Microphones
197(4)
Headset Microphones
201(1)
Wireless Microphones
202(1)
Desk Microphones
203(2)
Stand Microphones
205(1)
Hanging Microphones
206(1)
Hidden Microphones
207(1)
Long-distance Microphones
208(1)
How Microphones Work
209(9)
Sound-Generating Elements
209(1)
Dynamic Microphones
209(1)
Condenser Microphones
209(1)
Ribbon Microphones
209(1)
Sound Quality
210(1)
Specific Microphone Features
210(1)
Impedance
210(1)
Frequency Response
210(1)
Balanced and Unbalanced Mics and Cables, and Audio Connectors
210(4)
Mic Setups for Music Pickup
214(1)
Microphone Setup for Singer and Acoustic Guitar
214(1)
Microphone Setup for Singer and Piano
214(1)
Microphone Setup for Small Rock Group and Direct Insertion
215(1)
Microphone Use Specific to ENG/EFP
215(3)
Audio: Sound Control
218(24)
Sound Controls and Recording for Studio and Field Operations
220(15)
Production Equipment for Studio Audio
220(1)
Audio Console
220(4)
Patchbay
224(1)
Audio-recording Systems
225(1)
Analog Recording Systems
225(2)
Tape-based Digital Recording Systems
227(1)
Tapeless Recording Systems
228(1)
Audio Control in the Studio
229(1)
Audio Control Booth
229(1)
Basic Audio Operation
230(2)
Production Equipment and Basic Operation for Field Audio
232(1)
Keeping Sounds Separate
233(1)
Audio Mixer
233(1)
Audio Control in the Field
233(1)
Using the AGC in ENG and EFP
233(1)
EFP Mixing
233(2)
Postproduction and Sound Aesthetics
235(7)
Audio Postproduction Activities
235(1)
Linear and Nonlinear Sound Editing
235(1)
Correcting Audio Problems
236(1)
Postproduction Mixing
236(1)
Controlling Sound Quality
236(1)
Audio Postproduction Room
237(1)
Digital Audio Workstation
237(1)
Analog Audio Synchronizer
238(1)
Keyboards and Sampler
238(1)
Automatic Dialogue Replacement
238(1)
Sound Aesthetics
239(1)
Environment
239(1)
Figure/Ground
239(1)
Perspective
239(1)
Continuity
240(1)
Energy
240(1)
Stereo and Surround Sound
240(1)
Stereo Sound
240(1)
Surround Sound
241(1)
Switching, or Instantaneous Editing
242(18)
How Switchers Work
244(10)
Basic Switcher Functions
244(1)
Simple Switcher Layout
244(1)
Program Bus
244(1)
Mix Buses
245(1)
Preview Bus
245(1)
Effects Buses
246(1)
Multifunction Switchers
246(2)
Basic Switcher Operation
248(1)
Cut or Take
248(1)
Dissolve
249(2)
Super
251(1)
Fade
251(1)
Additional Special-effects Controls
251(3)
What Switchers Do
254(6)
Switcher Types and Functions
254(1)
Production Switchers
254(1)
Postproduction Switchers
255(1)
Master Control Switchers
256(1)
Routing Switchers
256(1)
Electronic Designs
256(1)
Composite and Component Switchers
256(2)
Analog and Digital Switchers
258(1)
Audio-follow-video Switchers
258(2)
Video-recording and Storage Systems
260(24)
How Video Recording Works
262(14)
Recording Systems and Technology
262(1)
Analog and Digital Systems
262(1)
Linear and Nonlinear Systems
263(1)
Composite and Component Systems
263(2)
Sampling
265(1)
Compression
265(1)
Tape-Based Recording and Storage Systems
266(1)
How Videotape Recording Works
266(1)
Operational VTR Controls
267(2)
Electronic Features
269(1)
Analog Videotape Recorders
269(1)
Digital Videotape Recorders
270(3)
Tapeless Recording and Storage Systems
273(1)
Hard Disk Systems
273(1)
Read/Write Optical Discs
274(1)
Flash Memory Devices
274(1)
Data Transfer
274(2)
How Video Recording Is Done
276(8)
Uses of Video Recording and Storage
276(1)
Building a Show
276(1)
Time Delay
276(1)
Program Duplication and Distribution
276(1)
Record Protection and Reference
276(1)
Video-Recording Production Factors
276(1)
Preproduction
277(2)
Production
279(5)
Postproduction Editing
284(36)
How Postproduction Editing Works
286(22)
Editing Modes: Off-and On-Line
286(1)
Linear Off-and On-line Editing
286(1)
Nonlinear Off- and On-line Editing
287(1)
Basic Editing Systems
287(1)
Linear Systems
287(1)
Nonlinear Systems
287(1)
Editing Principle
287(1)
Linear Editing Systems
288(1)
Single-source System
288(1)
Expanded Single-source System
289(1)
Multiple-source Systems
290(1)
Control Track and Time Code Editing
291(1)
Control Track, or Pulse-count, Editing
291(2)
Time Code Editing
293(1)
Linear Editing Features and Techniques
294(1)
Assemble Editing
294(1)
Insert Editing
295(1)
AB Rolling and AB-Roll Editing
295(1)
AB Rolling
295(2)
AB-roll Editing
297(1)
Nonlinear Editing Systems
297(1)
Nonlinear Editing Features and Techniques
298(1)
Capture
298(1)
Compression
299(1)
Storage
299(1)
Juxtaposing and Rearranging Video and Audio Files
299(1)
Pre-Editing Phase
300(1)
Shooting Phase
301(1)
Review Phase
301(1)
Preparation Phase
301(3)
Editing Procedures
304(1)
Shot Selection
304(1)
Shot Sequencing
305(1)
Audio Sweetening
305(1)
Creating the Final Edit Master Tape
306(1)
Operational Hints
306(2)
Making Editing Decisions
308(12)
Editing Functions
308(1)
Combine
308(1)
Shorten
308(1)
Correct
308(1)
Build
309(1)
Basic Transition Devices
309(1)
Cut
309(1)
Dissolve
309(1)
Wipe
309(1)
Fade
310(1)
Major Editing Principles
310(2)
Continuity Editing
312(5)
Complexity Editing
317(1)
Context
317(1)
Ethics
318(2)
Visual Effects
320(22)
Electronic Effects and How to Use Them
322(15)
Standard Analog Video Effects
322(1)
Superimposition
322(1)
Key
322(2)
Chroma Key
324(3)
Wipe
327(2)
Digital Video Effects
329(1)
Computer-manipulated Effects
330(1)
Image Size, Shape, Light, and Color
330(3)
Motion
333(2)
Multi-images
335(2)
Nonelectronic Effects and How to Use Them
337(5)
Optical Effects
337(1)
Television Gobos
337(1)
Reflections
338(1)
Star Filter
338(1)
Diffusion Filters
338(1)
Defocus
339(1)
Mechanical Effects
339(1)
Rain
340(1)
Snow
340(1)
Fog
340(1)
Wind
340(1)
Smoke
340(1)
Fire
340(1)
Lightning
341(1)
Design
342(24)
Designing and Using Television Graphics
344(11)
Specifications of Television Graphics
344(1)
Aspect Ratio
344(1)
Scanning and Essential Areas
345(1)
Out-of-aspect-ratio Graphics
346(1)
Matching STV and HDTV Aspect Ratios
346(2)
Information Density and Readability
348(2)
Color
350(2)
Style
352(1)
Synthetic Images
353(2)
Scenery and Props
355(11)
Television Scenery
355(1)
Standard Set Units
355(2)
Hanging Units
357(1)
Platforms and Wagons
358(1)
Set Pieces
359(1)
Properties and Set Dressings
360(1)
Stage Props
360(1)
Set Dressings
360(1)
Hand Properties
360(1)
Prop List
360(1)
Elements of Scene Design
361(1)
Floor Plan
361(2)
Set Backgrounds and Platforms
363(1)
Studio Floor Treatments
364(2)
Production People
366(24)
What Production People Do
368(18)
Nontechnical Production Personnel
368(2)
Technical Personnel and Crew
370(1)
News Production Personnel
370(1)
Television Talent
371(2)
Performance Techniques
373(1)
Performer and Camera
373(2)
Performer and Audio
375(1)
Performer and Timing
375(1)
Performer and Postproduction
376(1)
Floor Manager's Cues
376(1)
Prompting Devices
376(6)
Acting Techniques
382(1)
Audience
383(1)
Blocking
383(1)
Memorizing Lines
383(1)
Timing
384(1)
Actor and Postproduction
384(1)
Director/Actor Relationship
384(1)
Auditions
384(2)
How to Do Makeup and What to Wear
386(4)
Makeup
386(1)
Materials
386(1)
Application
387(1)
Technical Requirements
387(1)
Clothing and Costuming
388(1)
Clothing
388(1)
Costuming
389(1)
Producing
390(22)
What Producing Is All About
392(15)
Preproduction Planning: From Idea to Script
392(1)
Generating Program Ideas
392(1)
Using Production Models
393(2)
Writing the Program Proposal
395(2)
Preparing a Budget
397(4)
Writing the Script
401(1)
Preproduction Planning: Coordination
401(1)
People
401(1)
Facilities Request
402(1)
Schedules
403(1)
Permits and Clearances
403(1)
Publicity and Promotion
404(1)
Line Producer: Host and Watchdog
404(1)
Playing Host
404(1)
Watching the Production Flow
404(1)
Evaluating the Production
404(1)
Postproduction Activities
405(1)
Postproduction Editing
405(1)
Evaluation and Feedback
405(1)
Recordkeeping
405(2)
Dealing with Schedules, Legal Matters, and Ratings
407(5)
Time Line
407(1)
Information Resources
407(2)
Unions and Legal Matters
409(1)
Unions
409(1)
Copyrights and Clearances
409(1)
Other Legal Considerations
410(1)
Audience and Ratings
410(1)
Target Audience
410(1)
Ratings and Share
410(2)
The Director in Preproduction
412(32)
How a Director Prepares
414(17)
The Director's Roles
414(1)
Director as Artist
414(1)
Director as Psychologist
414(1)
Director as Technical Adviser
415(1)
Director as Coordinator
415(1)
Preproduction Activities
415(1)
Process Message
415(1)
Production Method
415(1)
Production Team and Communication
416(1)
Scheduling
416(1)
Script Formats
416(3)
Script Marking
419(8)
Floor Plan and Location Sketch
427(1)
Facilities Request
428(1)
Support Staff
429(1)
Floor Manager
429(1)
Associate, or Assistant, Director
430(1)
Production Assistant
430(1)
Moving from Script to Screen
431(13)
Visualization and Sequencing
431(4)
Formulating the Process Message
435(1)
Medium Requirements
435(2)
Interpreting the Floor Plan and the Location Sketch
437(3)
Script Analysis
440(1)
Locking-in Point and Translation
440(1)
Storyboard
440(4)
The Director in Production and Postproduction
444(26)
Multicamera Control Room Directing
446(18)
The Director's Terminology
446(1)
Multicamera Directing Procedures
446(1)
Directing from the Control Room
447(1)
Control Room Intercom Systems
447(8)
Directing Rehearsals
455(1)
Script Reading
455(1)
Dry Run, or Blocking Rehearsal
456(1)
Walk-through
457(1)
Camera and Dress Rehearsals
457(1)
Walk-through/Camera Rehearsal Combination
458(1)
Preparing a Time Line
459(2)
Directing the Show
461(1)
Standby Procedures
461(1)
On-the-air Procedures
461(3)
Single-camera Directing, Postproduction, and Timing
464(6)
Single-Camera Directing Procedures
464(1)
Visualization
464(1)
Script Breakdown
464(2)
Rehearsals
466(1)
Videotaping
466(1)
Postproduction Activities
466(1)
Controlling Clock Time
467(1)
Schedule Time and Running Time
467(1)
Clock Back-timing and Front-timing
467(1)
Converting Frames into Clock Time
468(1)
Controlling Subjective Time
468(2)
Field Production and Big Remotes
470(35)
ENG, EFP, and Big Remotes
472(15)
Electronic News Gathering
472(1)
ENG Production Features
473(1)
Satellite Uplink
473(1)
Electronic Field Production
474(1)
Preproduction
474(1)
Production: Equipment Check
475(1)
Production: Setup
476(1)
Production: Rehearsals
477(1)
Production: Videotaping
477(1)
Production: Strike and Equipment Check
477(1)
Postproduction
477(1)
Big Remotes
477(1)
Preproduction: The Remote Survey
478(2)
Production: Equipment Setup and Operation
480(5)
Production: Floor Manager and Talent Procedures
485(2)
Covering Major Events
487(18)
Sports Remotes
487(1)
Location Sketch and Remote Setups
487(1)
Reading Location Sketches
487(8)
Production Requirements for Public Hearing (Indoor Remote)
495(2)
Production Requirements for Parade (Outdoor Remote)
497(2)
Communication Systems
499(1)
ENG Communication Systems
499(1)
EFP Communication Systems
499(1)
Big-remote Communication Systems
499(1)
Signal Transport
500(1)
Microwave Transmission
500(1)
Communication Satellites: Frequencies, Uplinks, and Downlinks
501(2)
Cable Distribution
503(2)
Epilogue 505(1)
Glossary 506(26)
Selected Reading 532(2)
Index 534


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