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Themes of Contemporary Art : Visual Art after 1980,9780195162158

Themes of Contemporary Art : Visual Art after 1980

by ;
ISBN13:

9780195162158

ISBN10:
0195162153
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/20/2005
Publisher(s):
Oxford University Press
List Price: $40.48
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Summary

Themes of Contemporary Art: Visual Art after 1980 is a unique introduction to several important themes that have recurred in art over the past few decades. Examining visual art from 1980 to the present, it takes an intriguing and accessible approach that motivates students and other readers tothink actively about and discuss contemporary art--what it means and how it means what it does. The opening chapter provides a concise overview of the period, analyzing how four key changes (the rise of new media, a growing awareness of diversity, the influence of theory, and interactions witheveryday visual culture) have resulted in an art world with dramatically expanded boundaries. Reflecting the paradigm shift from a formalist way of teaching studio art to more varied and open-ended concepts, the remaining six chapters each deal with a key theme--time, place, the body, language,identity, and spirituality. Each chapter features an introduction to the thematic topic; a brief look at historical precedents and influences; a detailed analysis of how contemporary artists have responded to and embodied aspects of the theme in specific works; and an in-depth and fascinatingprofile of an artist who has extensively explored aspects of the theme in his or her work. Themes of Contemporary Art: Visual Art after 1980 shows how art can be interpreted from several different angles: techniques and materials, historical circumstances, aesthetic qualities, theoretical issues, and an artist's ideas and intentions. Writing in a lucid and engaging style, theauthors skillfully reveal the multiple levels of meaning in artworks, drawing connections between contemporary art, art of the past, and everyday existence. The volume is enhanced by 87 illustrations--19 in full color--that demonstrate an immense variety of materials, subjects, and styles. Thesewell-chosen examples will help readers learn to critically describe, interpret, and evaluate contemporary visual art. A bibliography and a timeline that situates contemporary art in the context of major events in world history, art, and popular culture are also included. An ideal core text forcourses in contemporary art history, Themes of Contemporary Art: Visual Art after 1980 can also be used as a supplement in modern art, art appreciation, art criticism/theory, and studio art courses.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Introduction
Themes of Contemporary Art: What, Why, and How
4(3)
A Brief Orientation
7(2)
The Art World Expands
9(24)
Overview of History and Art History, 1980--2004
11(3)
Old Media Thrive, New Media Make Waves
14(5)
A Spectrum of Possibilities Emerges
19(3)
Theory Flexes Its Muscles
22(5)
Art Meets Contemporary Culture
27(6)
Time
33(36)
Time and Art History
35(10)
Representing time
36(4)
Embodying time
40(5)
Changing Views of Time
45(4)
Changing Views of the Past
49(1)
Exhibits about Time
50(1)
Exploring the Structure of Time
50(6)
Fracturing time
51(1)
Real time
52(1)
Changing rhythm
53(2)
Exploring endlessness
55(1)
Revisiting the Past
56(4)
Recovering history
56(2)
Reshuffling the past
58(1)
Reframing the present
59(1)
Commemorating the Past
60(3)
Profile: Brian Tolle
63(6)
Place
69(34)
Places Have Meanings
69(2)
Places Have Value
71(1)
Exhibits about Place
72(1)
History's Influence
72(6)
(Most) places exist in space
73(2)
The work of art exists in a place
75(3)
Looking at Places
78(2)
Looking Out for Places
80(4)
Constructing (and Deconstructing) Artificial Places
84(5)
Placeless Spaces
89(1)
What's Public? What's Private?
90(3)
In-between Places
93(3)
Profile: Janet Cardiff
96(7)
Identity
103(26)
Identity in Art History
106(1)
Identity Is Communal or Relational
107(3)
Social and cultural identities
107(1)
Identity politics
108(2)
Identity Is Constructed
110(4)
Essentialism
111(1)
Difference
111(3)
Identity Is Not Fixed
114(2)
Sexual Identity Is Diverse
116(2)
Hybridity
118(2)
Reinventing Identities
120(2)
Profile: Jaune Quick-to-See Smith
122(7)
The Body
129(32)
Past Figurative Art
131(2)
A New Spin on the Body
133(6)
The body is a battleground
135(1)
The body is a sign
135(2)
People are bodies
137(2)
The Body Beautiful
139(2)
Different bodies
139(1)
Body parts
140(1)
Mortal Bodies
141(2)
Sexual Bodies
143(7)
The gaze
145(2)
Sexual pleasure and desire
147(2)
Sex and violence
149(1)
Posthuman Bodies
150(3)
Profile: Shirin Neshat
153(8)
Language
161(38)
Words with Art: A History
162(2)
Art with Words: A History
164(2)
Recent Theories of Language
166(2)
Reasons for Using Language
168(3)
Exhibitions and Publications Concerning Language in Art
171(1)
Language Makes Meaning
171(3)
Language Takes Form
174(9)
Transparency and translucency
175(3)
Spatiality and physicality
178(1)
Books made by artists
179(1)
Art made with books
180(3)
Wielding the Power of Language
183(3)
Confronting the Challenge of Translation
186(3)
Using Text in the Information Age
189(3)
Profile: Ken Aptekar
192(7)
Spirituality
199(28)
A Short History
201(3)
A Few Strategies
204(6)
Manipulating forms, materials, and processes
204(2)
Manipulating meanings and minds
206(4)
Finding Faith and Harboring Doubt
210(3)
Expressing Religious Identities
213(2)
Facing Death, Doom, and Destruction
215(2)
Mingling the Sacred and the Secular
217(4)
Profile: Jose Bedia
221(6)
Timeline 227(8)
Selected Bibliography 235(6)
Index 241


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