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A Theory Of Justice: Original Edition

by
ISBN13:

9780674017726

ISBN10:
0674017722
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/31/2005
Publisher(s):
Harvard Univ Pr
List Price: $33.50
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Summary

Though the Revised Edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawlsıs view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawlsıs theory refers to the first edition. This reissue makes the first edition once again available for scholars and serious students of Rawlsıs work.ıJohn Rawls draws on the most subtle techniques of contemporary analytic philosophy to provide the social contract tradition with what is, from a philosophical point of view at least, the most formidable defense it has yet received ı [and] makes available the powerful intellectual resources and the comprehensive approach that have so far eluded antiutilitarians.ııMarshall Cohen, New York Times Book ReviewıI mean ı to press my recommendation of [this book] to non-philosophers, especially those holding positions of responsibility in law and government. For the topic with which it deals is central to this countryıs purposes, and the misunderstanding of that topic is central to its difficulties.ııPeter Caws, New RepublicıThe most substantial and interesting contribution to moral philosophy since the war.ııStuart Hampshire, New York Review of Books

Table of Contents

Part One. Theory
CHAPTER I. JUSTICE AS FAIRNESS
3(51)
1. The Role of Justice
3(4)
2. The Subject of Justice
7(4)
3. The Main Idea of the Theory of Justice
11(6)
4. The Original Position and Justification
17(5)
5. Classical Utilitarianism
22(5)
6. Some Related Contrasts
27(7)
7. Intuitionism
34(6)
8. The Priority Problem
40(6)
9. Some Remarks about Moral Theory
46(8)
CHAPTER II. THE PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE
54(64)
10. Institutions and Formal Justice
54(6)
11. Two Principles of Justice
60(5)
12. Interpretations of the Second Principle
65(10)
13. Democratic Equality and the Difference Principle
75(8)
14. Fair Equality of Opportunity and Pure Procedural Justice
83(7)
15. Primary Social Goods as the Basis of Expectations
90(5)
16. Relevant Social Positions
95(5)
17. The Tendency to Equality
100(8)
18. Principles for Individuals: The Principle of Fairness
108(6)
19. Principles for Individuals: The Natural Duties
114(4)
CHAPTER III. THE ORIGINAL POSITION
118(77)
20. The Nature of the Argument for Conceptions of Justice
118(4)
21. The Presentation of Alternatives
122(4)
22. The Circumstances of Justice
126(4)
23. The Formal Constraints of the Concept of Right
130(6)
24. The Veil of Ignorance
136(6)
25. The Rationality of the Parties
142(8)
26. The Reasoning Leading to the Two Principles of Justice
150(11)
27. The Reasoning Leading to the Principle of Average Utility
161(6)
28. Some Difficulties with the Average Principle
167(8)
29. Some Main Grounds for the Two Principles of Justice
175(8)
30. Classical Utilitarianism, Impartiality, and Benevolence
183(12)
Part Two. Institutions
CHAPTER IV. EQUAL LIBERTY
195(63)
31. The Four-Stage Sequence
195(6)
32. The Concept of Liberty
201(4)
33. Equal Liberty of Conscience
205(6)
34. Toleration and the Common Interest
211(5)
35. Toleration of the Intolerant
216(5)
36. Political Justice and the Constitution
221(7)
37. Limitations on the Principle of Participation
228(7)
38. The Rule of Law
235(8)
39. The Priority of Liberty Defined
243(8)
40. The Kantian Interpretation of Justice as Fairness
251(7)
CHAPTER V. DISTRIBUTIVE SHARES
258(75)
41. The Concept of Justice in Political Economy
258(7)
42. Some Remarks about Economic Systems
265(9)
43. Background Institutions for Distributive Justice
274(10)
44. The Problem of Justice between Generations
284(9)
45. Time Preference
293(5)
46. Further Cases of Priority
298(5)
47. The Precepts of Justice
303(7)
48. Legitimate Expectations and Moral Desert
310(5)
49. Comparison with Mixed Conceptions
315(10)
50. The Principle of Perfection
325(8)
CHAPTER VI. DUTY AND OBLIGATION
333(62)
51. The Arguments for the Principles of Natural Duty
333(9)
52. The Arguments for the Principle of Fairness
342(8)
53. The Duty To Comply with an Unjust Law
350(6)
54. The Status of Majority Rule
356(7)
55. The Definition of Civil Disobedience
363(5)
56. The Definition of Conscientious Refusal
368(3)
57. The Justification of Civil Disobedience
371(6)
58. The Justification of Conscientious Refusal
377(5)
59. The Role of Civil Disobedience
382(13)
Part Three. Ends
CHAPTER VII. GOODNESS AS RATIONALITY
395(58)
60. The Need for a Theory of the Good
395(4)
61. The Definition of Good for Simpler Cases
399(5)
62. A Note on Meaning
404(3)
63. The Definition of Good for Plans of Life
407(9)
64. Deliberative Rationality
416(8)
65. The Aristotelian Principle
424(9)
66. The Definition of Good Applied to Persons
433(7)
67. Self-Respect, Excellences, and Shame
440(6)
68. Several Contrasts between the Right and the Good
446(7)
CHAPTER VIII. THE SENSE OF JUSTICE
453(60)
69. The Concept of a Well-Ordered Society
453(9)
70. The Morality of Authority
462(5)
71. The Morality of Association
467(5)
72. The Morality of Principles
472(7)
73. Features of the Moral Sentiments
479(6)
74. The Connection between Moral and Natural Attitudes
485(5)
75. The Principles of Moral Psychology
490(6)
76. The Problem of Relative Stability
496(8)
77. The Basis of Equality
504(9)
CHAPTER IX. THE GOOD OF JUSTICE
513(76)
78. Autonomy and Objectivity
513(7)
79. The Idea of Social Union
520(10)
80. The Problem of Envy
530(4)
81. Envy and Equality
534(7)
82. The Grounds for the Priority of Liberty
541(7)
83. Happiness and Dominant Ends
548(6)
84. Hedonism as a Method of Choice
554(6)
85. The Unity of the Self
560(7)
86. The Good of the Sense of Justice
567(10)
87. Concluding Remarks on Justification
577(12)
Index 589


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