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A Theory of Justice

by
Edition:
Revised
ISBN13:

9780674000780

ISBN10:
0674000781
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
9/30/1999
Publisher(s):
Harvard Univ Pr
List Price: $35.00

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Summary

Since it appeared in 1971, John Rawls's A Theory of Justice has become a classic. The author has now revised the original edition to clear up a number of difficulties he and others have found in the original book. Rawls aims to express an essential part of the common core of the democratic tradition--justice as fairness--and to provide an alternative to utilitarianism, which had dominated the Anglo-Saxon tradition of political thought since the nineteenth century. Rawls substitutes the ideal of the social contract as a more satisfactory account of the basic rights and liberties of citizens as free and equal persons. "Each person," writes Rawls, "possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override." Advancing the ideas of Rousseau, Kant, Emerson, and Lincoln, Rawls's theory is as powerful today as it was when first published.

Author Biography

John Rawls is James B. Conant University Professor, Emeritus, at Harvard University.

Table of Contents

Preface for the Revised Edition xi
Preface xvii
Part One. Theory
Justice as Fairness
3(44)
The Role of Justice
3(3)
The Subject of Justice
6(4)
The Main Idea of the Theory of Justice
10(5)
The Original Position and Justification
15(4)
Classical Utilitarianism
19(5)
Some Related Contrasts
24(6)
Institutionism
30(6)
The Priority Problem
36(4)
Some Remarks about Moral Theory
40(7)
The Principles of Justice
47(55)
Institutions and Formal Justice
47(5)
Two Principles of Justice
52(5)
Interpretations of the Second Principle
57(8)
Democractic Equality and the Difference Principle
65(8)
Fair Equality of Opportunity and Pure Procedural Justice
73(5)
Primary Social Goods as the Basis of Expectations
78(3)
Relevant Social Positions
81(5)
The Tendency to Equality
86(7)
Principles for Individuals: The Principles of Fairness
93(5)
Principles for Individuals: The Natural Duties
98(4)
The Original Position
102(69)
The Nature of the Argument for Conceptions of Justice
102(3)
The Presentation of Alternatives
105(4)
The Circumstances of Justice
109(3)
The Formal Constraints of the Concept of Right
112(6)
The Veil of Ignorance
118(5)
The Rationality of the Parties
123(7)
The Reasoning Leading to the Two Principles of Justice
130(9)
The Reasoning Leading to the Principle of Average Utility
139(5)
Some Difficulties with the Average Principle
144(9)
Some Main Grounds for the Two Principles of Justice
153(7)
Classical Utilitarianism, Impartiality, and Benevolence
160(11)
Part Two. Institutions
Equal Liberty
171(57)
The Four-Stage Sequence
171(5)
The Concept of Liberty
176(4)
Equal Liberty of Conscience
180(6)
Toleration and the Common Interest
186(4)
Toleration of the Intolerant
190(4)
Political Justice and the Constitution
194(6)
Limitations on the Principle of Participation
200(6)
The Rule of Law
206(8)
The Priority of Liberty Defined
214(7)
The Kantian Interpretation of Justice as Fairness
221(7)
Distributive Shares
228(65)
The Concept of Justice in Political Economy
228(6)
Some Remarks about Economic Systems
234(8)
Background Institutions for Distributive Justice
242(9)
The Problem of Justice between Generations
251(8)
Time Preference
259(4)
Further Cases of Priority
263(4)
The Precepts of Justice
267(6)
Legitimate Expectations and Moral Desert
273(4)
Comparison with Mixed Conceptions
277(8)
The Principle of Perfection
285(8)
Duty and Obligation
293(54)
The Arguments for the Principles of Natural Duty
293(8)
The Arguments for the Principle of Fairness
301(7)
The Duty to Comply with an Unjust Law
308(5)
The Status of Majority Rule
313(6)
The Definition of Civil Disobedience
319(4)
The Definition of Conscientious Refusal
323(3)
The Justification of Civil Disobedience
326(5)
The Justification of Conscientious Refusal
331(4)
The Role of Civil Disobedience
335(12)
Part Three. Ends
Goodness as Rationality
347(50)
The Need for a Theory of the Good
347(3)
The Definition of Good for Simpler Cases
350(5)
A Note on Meaning
355(3)
The Definition of Good for Plans of Life
358(7)
Deliberative Rationality
365(7)
The Aristotelian Principle
372(8)
The Definition of Good Applied to Persons
380(6)
Self-Respect, Excellences, and Shame
386(6)
Several Contrasts between the Right and the Good
392(5)
The Sense of Justice
397(53)
The Concept of a Well-Ordered Society
397(8)
The Morality of Authority
405(4)
The Morality of Association
409(5)
The Morality of Principles
414(6)
Features of the Moral Sentiments
420(5)
The Connection between Moral and Natural Attitudes
425(4)
The Principles of Moral Psychology
429(5)
The Problem of Relative Stability
434(7)
The Basis of Equality
441(9)
The Good of Justice
450(67)
Autonomy and Objectivity
450(6)
The Idea of Social Union
456(8)
The Problem of Envy
464(4)
Envy and Equality
468(6)
The Grounds for the Priority of Liberty
474(6)
Happiness and Dominant Ends
480(6)
Hedonism as a Method of Choice
486(5)
The Unity of the Self
491(5)
The Good of the Sense of Justice
496(10)
Concluding Remarks on Justification
506(11)
Conversion Table 517(4)
Index 521


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