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Through the Eyes of a Child : An Introduction to Children's Literature,9780130422071
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Through the Eyes of a Child : An Introduction to Children's Literature

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780130422071

ISBN10:
013042207X
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $103.00
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Summary

In its seventh edition, "Through the Eyes of a Child: An Introduction to Children's Literature" continues to be a visually stunning, theoretically sound, comprehensive overview of children's literature. It focuses squarely on selecting and evaluating quality literature to share with children and guiding them to appreciate and respond to that literature. This edition features multicultural literature and young adult literature in every chapter, expanded coverage of biographies and informational books and over 100 new children's titles referenced throughout. A children's literature CD-ROM accompanies the book and contains bibliographic information for thousands of titles, making it even easier to share quality literature with children and adolescents.

Table of Contents

The Child Responds to Literature
1(40)
Values of Literature for Children
2(1)
Promoting Child Development Through Literature
3(31)
Language Development
3(7)
Cognitive Development
10(9)
Personality Development
19(7)
Social Development
26(8)
Children's Responses to Literature
34(4)
Factors Within Readers
34(1)
Factors Within Texts
34(1)
Factors Within Contexts
35(1)
Responses
35(1)
Analyzing Responses
36(1)
The Rote of Motivation
36(2)
Suggested Activities
38(3)
The History of Children's Literature
41(32)
Milestones in the History of Children's Literature
43(20)
The Oral Tradition
43(1)
Early Printed Books
44(2)
The Puritan Influence
46(1)
John Locke's Influence on Views of Childhood
47(1)
Charles Perrault's Tales of Mother Goose
47(1)
The Adventure Stories of Defoe and Swift
48(1)
Newbery's Books for Children
48(2)
Rousseau's Philosophy of Natural Development
50(1)
William Blake's Poetry About Children
50(1)
The Fairy Tales of Andersen and the Brothers Grimm
50(1)
Early Illustrators of Children's Books
51(3)
The Victorian Influence
54(2)
Fantasy Adventure, and Real People
56(7)
The History of Censorship
63(2)
Children and the Family in Children's Literature
65(7)
The Child and the Family, 1856-1903
65(2)
The Child and the Family, 1938-1960
67(1)
The Child and the Family, 1969-2000
68(4)
Suggested Activities
72(1)
Evaluating and Selecting Literature for Children
73(42)
Standards, Literary Elements and Book Section
74(1)
Standards for Evaluating Books and Literary Criticism
75(2)
Literary Elements
77(19)
Plot
77(5)
Characterization
82(3)
Setting
85(4)
Theme
89(3)
Style
92(1)
Point of View
93(2)
Stereotypes
95(1)
The Right Book for Each Child
96(2)
Accessibility
96(1)
Readability
97(1)
Interest and Reader Response
97(1)
The Child as Critic
98(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Questions to Ask Myself When I Judge a Book
99(1)
Suggested Activities
99(1)
Teaching with Literary Elements
100(1)
Involving Children in Plot
100(1)
Involving Children in Characterization
101(2)
Characterization Techniques
101(1)
Modeling Inferencing
102(1)
Involving Children in Setting
103(3)
Setting That Create Moods
103(1)
Settings That Develop Antagonists
104(1)
Settings That Develop Historical and Geographical Backgrounds
105(1)
Settings That Are Symbolic
105(1)
Involving Children in Theme
106(1)
Involving Children in Style
106(1)
Personification
106(1)
Pleasing Style
107(1)
Webbing the Literacy Elements
107(1)
Questioning to Encourage Aesthetic Responses
107(4)
Suggested Activities
111(1)
Children's Literature
111(4)
Artists and Their illustrations
115(42)
Understanding Artists and Their Illustrations
116(1)
Visual Elements The Grammar of Artists
116(6)
Line
116(2)
Color
118(2)
Shape
120(1)
Texture
121(1)
Design: Organizing the Visual Elements
122(3)
Artistic Media
125(4)
Lines and Washes
125(1)
Watercolors, Acrylics, Pastels, and Oils
125(2)
Woodcuts
127(1)
Collage
128(1)
Artistic Style
129(2)
Representational Art
129(2)
Abstract Art
131(1)
Evaluating the Illustrations in Children's Books
131(1)
Artistic Criticism and Personal Response
131(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Illustrations
131(2)
Outstanding Illustrators of Children's Books
133(6)
Barbara Cooney
133(1)
Tomie dePaola
134(1)
Leo and Diane Dillon
134(1)
Susan Jeffers
135(1)
Ezra Jack Keats
135(1)
Robert McCloskey
135(1)
Alice and Martin Provensen
135(1)
Maurice Sendak
136(1)
Chris Van Allsburg
137(1)
David Wiesner
138(1)
Suggested Activities
139(1)
Teaching with Artists and Their Illustrations
140(1)
Aesthetic Scanning
140(1)
Visual Literacy
141(2)
Studying inspirations for Art
143(2)
Investigating the Works of Great Artists
145(4)
Suggested Activities
149(1)
Children's Literature
149(8)
Picture Books
157(50)
A Book Is More Than Words
158(1)
What a Picture Book Is
158(1)
Literary Criticism: Evaluating Picture Books
159(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Selecting High-Quality Picture Books
159(1)
Mother Goose
159(4)
Appealing Characteristics
160(1)
Collections
160(2)
Books that Illustrate One Rhyme or Tale
162(1)
Nursery Rhymes in Other Lands
162(1)
Toy Books
163(1)
Alphabet Books
164(4)
Early Alphabet Books
165(1)
Animal Themes
166(1)
Other Alphabet Books
167(1)
Counting Books
168(2)
Concept Books
170(1)
Wordless Books
171(2)
Evaluation Criteria-Selecting High-Quality Wordless Books
173(1)
Easy-to-Read Books
173(2)
Picture Storybooks
175(12)
Elements in Picture Storybooks
175(6)
Typical Characters and Situations
181(6)
Suggested Activities
187(1)
Teaching with Picture Books
188(1)
Sharing Mother Goose
188(1)
Sharing Wordless Books
189(1)
Stimulating Cognitive and Language Development
189(1)
Motivating Writing and Reading
189(1)
Reading to Children
190(2)
Choosing the Books
190(1)
Preparing to Read Aloud
190(1)
The Reading Itself
190(2)
Developing Aesthetic Sensitivity
192(1)
Motivating Writing with Picture Storybooks
193(3)
Other Activities Possible
196(1)
Suggested Activities
197(1)
Children's Literature
197(10)
Tradition Literature
207(64)
Of Castle and Cottage
208(1)
Our Traditional Literary Heritage
208(1)
Types of Traditional Literature
209(3)
Folktales
209(2)
Fables
211(1)
Myths
211(1)
Legends
211(1)
Values of Traditional Literature for Children
212(1)
Understanding the World
212(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Increasing World Understanding Through Traditional Tales
212(2)
Identifying with Universal Human Struggles
212(1)
Pleasure
213(1)
Authenticating the Folklore
214(1)
Folktales
214(25)
Characteristics
214(5)
Motifs
219(2)
Folktales from the British Isles
221(1)
French Folktales
222(2)
German Folktales
224(1)
Norwegian Folktales
225(3)
Russian Folktales
228(1)
Jewish Folktales
229(2)
Asian Folktales
231(3)
Middle Eastern Folktales
234(2)
African Folktales
236(1)
North American Folktales
236(3)
Fables
239(2)
Characteristics
239(1)
Contemporary Editions
239(2)
Myths
241(5)
Greek and Roman Mythology
242(2)
Norse Mythology
244(2)
Myths from Other Cultures
246(1)
Legends
246(4)
Suggested Activities
250(1)
Teaching with Traditional Literature
251(1)
Telling Stories
251(3)
Choosing a Story
251(1)
Preparing the Story for Telling
252(1)
Sharing the Story with an Audience
252(1)
Observing Children's Responses to Storytelling
253(1)
Encouraging Children to Be Storytellers
253(1)
Using Feltboards to Share Folktales
253(1)
Comparing Folktales from Different Countries
254(6)
Comparing Different Versions of the Same Tale
254(5)
Analyzing Variants
259(1)
Investigating Themes or Motifs Found in Tales from Many Cultures
260(1)
Investigating Folktales from a Single Country
261(2)
Motivating Writing Through Traditional Tales
263(1)
Developing Critical Evaluators for Fables
264(1)
Suggested Activities
264(1)
Children's Literature
264(7)
Modern Fantasy
271(46)
Time, Space, and Place
272(1)
Evaluating Modern Fantasy
273(1)
Suspending Disbelief Plot
273(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Selecting Modern Fantasy
273(2)
Suspending Disbelief Characterization
273(1)
Creating a World: Setting
274(1)
Universality: Themes
274(1)
Suspending Disbelief Point of View
275(1)
Bridges Between Traditional and Modern Fantasy
275(9)
Literary Folktales
276(1)
Religious and Ethical Allegory
277(2)
Mythical Quests and Conflicts
279(5)
Categories of Modern Fantasy
284(16)
Articulate Animals
284(6)
Preposterous Characters and Situations
290(2)
Strange and Curious Worlds
292(1)
Little People
293(1)
Spirits Friendly and Frightening
294(1)
Time Warps
295(1)
Science Fiction
296(4)
Suggested Activities
300(1)
Teaching with Modern Fantasy
301(1)
Helping Children Recognize, Understand, and Enjoy Elements in Fantasy
301(4)
Interpreting Modern Fantasy by Identifying Plot Structures
305(2)
Involving Children with Science Fiction
307(1)
Interdisciplinary Studies: Interaction Between Social Studies and Science Fiction
307(1)
Unit Plan: Using One Book of Modern Fantasy
308(2)
Oral Discussion
309(1)
Artwork
310(1)
Creative Dramatization
310(1)
Suggested Activities
310(1)
Children's Literature
311(6)
Poetry
317(44)
Rhythmic Patterns of Language
318(1)
The Values of Poetry for Children
318(1)
What Poetry Is
319(1)
Characteristics of Poems That Children Prefer
320(2)
Criteria for Selecting Poetry for Children
322(1)
Elements of Poetry
322(1)
Rhythm
322(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Selecting Poetry for Children
323(6)
Rhyme and Other Sound Patterns
323(2)
Repetition
325(1)
Imagery
326(2)
Shape
328(1)
Forms of Poetry
329(4)
Lyric Poetry
329(1)
Narrative Poetry
329(2)
Ballads
331(1)
Limericks
331(1)
Concrete Poems
332(1)
Haiku
332(1)
Poems and Poets
333(11)
Nonsense and Humor: Poems for Starting Out Right
333(3)
Nature Poems
336(2)
Characters, Situations, and Locations
338(3)
Moods and Feelings
341(1)
Animals
342(2)
Witches and Ghosts
344(1)
Suggested Activities
344(1)
Teaching with Poetry
345(1)
Poetry Workshop
345(1)
Listening to Poetry
346(1)
Moving to Poetry
346(1)
Dramatizing Poetry
347(1)
Developing Choral Speaking
347(2)
Refrain Arrangement
348(1)
Line Arrangement
348(1)
Antiphonal, or Dialogue, Arrangement
348(1)
Cumulative Arrangement
349(1)
Unison Arrangement
349(1)
Choosing Poetry to Accompany Content
349(1)
Writing Poetry
350(6)
Motivations
350(1)
Oral Exchanges of Ideas
351(1)
Transcriptions
351(1)
Sharing
352(1)
Various Forms o f Poetry
352(3)
Poetry Writing Exercises
355(1)
Adults Writing Poetry for Juvenile Audiences
356(1)
Children's Literature
356(5)
Contemporary Realistic Fiction
361(50)
Window on the World
362(1)
What Contemporary Realistic Fiction Is
362(1)
Values of Realistic Fiction
363(1)
How Realistic Fiction Has Changed
364(1)
Literary Criticism: New Realism and the Problem Novel
364(1)
Controversial Issues
365(4)
Sexism
365(2)
Sexuality
367(1)
Violence
367(1)
Profanity
368(1)
Family Problems and Other Controversial Issues
368(1)
Literary Criticism: Guidelines for Selecting Controversial Fiction
369(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Controversial Books
369(1)
Literary Elements
370(1)
Plot
370(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Realistic Fiction
371(3)
Characterization
371(1)
Theme
372(1)
Style
373(1)
Subjects in Realistic Fiction
374(15)
Family Life
374(4)
Growing Up
378(3)
Survival
381(3)
Death
384(3)
People as Individuals, Not Stereotypes
387(2)
Animal Stories, Mysteries, Sports Stories, and Humor
389(6)
Animals
389(2)
Mysteries
391(1)
Sports
392(1)
Humor
393(2)
Suggested Activities
395(1)
Teaching with Realistic Fiction
396(1)
Using Role Playing
396(2)
Using Survival Stories to Motivate Reading and Interaction with Literature
398(4)
Interdisciplinary Unit Island Survival
398(4)
Improving Self Esteem and Understanding of Individuals
402(1)
Developing Questioning Strategies
402(4)
Literal Recognition
402(3)
Inference
405(1)
Evaluation
405(1)
Appreciation
406(1)
Suggested Activities
406(1)
Children's Literature
406(5)
Historical Fiction
411(44)
The People and the Past Came Alive
412(1)
Values of Historical Fiction for Children
412(1)
Literary Criticism: Using Literary Elements to Evaluate Historical Fiction
413(1)
Plot
413(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Historical Fiction
413(5)
Characterization
414(1)
Setting
415(1)
Theme
416(2)
Style
418(1)
Historical Authenticity
418(1)
A Chronology of Historical Fiction
419(24)
Ancient Times Through the Middle Ages
420(4)
Changes in the Old World and Encounters with the New World
424(2)
The Salem Witch-Hunts
426(1)
The American Revolution
427(1)
Early Expansion of the United States and Canada
428(2)
Slavery and the Civil War
430(2)
The Western Frontier
432(4)
The Early Twentieth Century
436(2)
World War II
438(5)
Suggested Activities
443(1)
Teaching with Historical Fiction
444(1)
Providing Background Though Illustrations
444(1)
Interdisciplinary Unit: Looking at Pioneer America
444(4)
Values from the Past
445(1)
The Pioneer Environment
446(1)
Trails in Westward Expansion
447(1)
Research Skills
448(1)
Additional Activities
448(1)
A Culminating Activity
448(1)
Creating a Historical Fiction ``Books on the Move'' Source
448(3)
Suggested Activities
451(1)
Children's Literature
451(4)
Multicultural Literature
455(74)
Our Rich Mosaic
457(1)
What Multicultural Literature Is
457(1)
Values of Multicultural Literature
457(1)
Images of Racial and Ethnic Minorities in the Past
457(3)
African Americans
458(1)
Native Americans
458(1)
Latino Americans
459(1)
Asian Americans
459(1)
Literary Criticism: Evaluating Multicultural Literature
460(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Multicultural Literature
460(1)
African American Literature
461(13)
Traditional Literature
461(7)
Fiction
468(5)
Nonfiction
473(1)
Native American Literature
474(13)
Traditional Tales
475(5)
Songs and Poetry
480(1)
Historical Fiction
481(2)
Contemporary Realistic Fiction
483(2)
Nonfiction
485(1)
Biographies
486(1)
Latino Literature
487(7)
Folklore
488(3)
Picture Storybooks
491(1)
Historical and Contemporary Realistic Fiction
491(2)
Nonfiction
493(1)
Asian American Literature
494(5)
Suggested Activities
499(2)
Teaching with Multicultural Literature
500(1)
Developing an Appreciation for African American Culture
501(7)
Traditional Literature
501(3)
Folklore of the American South
504(1)
Historical Non fiction
505(1)
Historical Fiction
506(1)
Contemporary Fiction
507(1)
Developing an Appreciation for Native American Culture
508(5)
Native American Folklore
508(1)
Folklore from Specific Peoples
509(1)
Historical Nonfiction
510(1)
Historical Fiction
511(1)
Contemporary Fiction
512(1)
Developing an Appreciation for Latino Culture
513(2)
Ancient Aztec and Mayan Folklore
513(1)
Stories That Reflect Interaction with Other Cultures
514(1)
Historical Nonfiction
514(1)
Historical Fiction
514(1)
Contemporary Literature
515(1)
Developing an Appreciation for Asian American Culture
515(4)
Traditional Tales
516(1)
A Japanese Kamishibai Presentation
516(3)
Recognizing Similarities
519(1)
Suggested Activities
519(1)
Children's Literature
519(10)
Nonfiction: Biographies and Informational Books
529
From Who's-Who to How-To
530(1)
Biographies
530(3)
Changing Ideas About Biographies for Children
530(3)
Literary Criticism: Evaluating Biographies
533(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Biography
533(14)
Biographical Subjects
536(11)
Informational Books
547(2)
Values of Informational Books
547(1)
Evaluating Informational Books
548(1)
Evaluation Criteria-Literary Criticism: Informational Books
549(22)
History and Culture
552(7)
Nature
559(8)
Discoveries and How Things Work
567(1)
Hobbies, Crafts, and How-To Books
568(3)
Suggested Activities
571(1)
Teaching with Nonfictional Literature
572(1)
Unit Plan: Using Biographies in Creative Dramatizations
572(2)
Reader Response: Developing Hypothetical Interviews with Authors
573(1)
Imaginary Conversations Between People of Two Time Periods
573(1)
Comparing Attitudes and Checking Facts in Biographies
574(1)
Analyzing Literary Elements in Biographies
574(1)
Incorporating Literature into the Science Curriculum
574(7)
Using the Parts of a Book
575(1)
Locating Sources of Information
576(1)
Using Science Vocabulary
576(1)
Reading for Meaning
576(1)
Evaluating Science Materials
577(4)
Suggested Activities
581(1)
Children's Literature
581
References 1(1)
Author, Illustrator, Title Index 1(35)
Subject Index 36

Excerpts

If you are an adult who wants to share books with children,Through the Eyes of a Childis written for you. Whether the children's literature course is offered in the department of Education, English, or Library Science, the text's unique two-part chapter organization and special features provide a meaningful guide to understanding children's literature. What you will find in this new edition is a stronger focus on teaching, with voices from the field, new teaching ideas, and student artifacts. The same quality of literary criticism; the strongest, most researched treatment of multicultural literature; streamlined prose; integrated technology; innovative and meaningful special features; and a balance between new and classic titles are other strong components of this revision. Organization Unique Two-Part Chapter Organization Beginning in Chapter 3 and extending through Chapter 12, each chapter is purposely divided into two parts. The first discusses in depth the characteristics, history, and the classic and best new titles of each genre suitable for courses emphasizing Education, English, or Library Science. The second part of each genre chapter contains streamlined, classroom-tested strategies for teaching children with the best literature, providing readers with the best methods for using children's literature in their classrooms. These chapters are now connected to an online activities book, which contains many more such strategies, that can be found at www.prenhall.com/norton . Strong Multicultural Theme Always the leader in multicultural literature scholarship, this new edition continues the strong multicultural theme with a dedicated chapter, as well as complete integration of important multicultural titles in every chapter, reflecting the importance of the literature, and the necessity of understanding and studying its contributions to all genres. New to This Edition New Titles for the Sixth Edition As in the past, there has been a careful selection of new books, which has resulted in the addition of hundreds of new titles representing the best children's books published since 1999. The books discussed in this edition were chosen for their quality of literature and to create a balance between new books and those that have stood the test of time and are considered to be classics. In addition to the newest literature, the text includes numerous adult references that reflect the viewpoints, issues, and scholarly findings of professionals who write and work in the area of children's literature. While hundreds of new titles were studied and included in this edition, hundreds of other titles were cut because the books are no longer in print. The exclusion of books that are out of print is meant to assist librarians, educators, and other professionals who may want to order the books that are discussed or mentioned in the text. However, a very limited number of out of print books are included, because they are still available in libraries, are the best examples for a specific discussion, or are just too good to be ignored. Emphasis on the Artistry Heartfelt thanks are extended to cover artist Yangsook Choi, whose distinctive illustrative style and writing have received acclaim fromThe New York Times(Outstanding Book of the Year),Publisher's Weekly(one of the most prominent new children's book artists of 1997), International Reading Association (Children's Book Award), American Library Association (Notable Book), and Oppenheim (Toy Portfolio Gold Award). Her beautiful original piece for our cover expresses the joy and celebration to be found, savored, and shared in quality literature, and we are grateful for and honored by her work for us. The beauty and artistry of children's literature begin with our cover and are carried throughout this beautiful text. The full


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