9780826429537

Toms, Coons, Mulattoes, Mammies, and Bucks An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films, Updated and Expanded 5th Edition

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780826429537

  • ISBN10:

    082642953X

  • Edition: 5th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2/25/2016
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

This classic iconic study of black images in American motion pictures has been updated and revised, as Donald Bogle continues to enlighten us with his historical and social reflections on the relationship between African Americans and Hollywood. He notes the remarkable shifts that have come about in the new millennium when such filmmakers as Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave) and Ava DuVernay (Selma) examined America's turbulent racial history and the particular dilemma of black actresses in Hollywood, including Halle Berry, Lupita Nyong'o, Octavia Spencer, Jennifer Hudson, and Viola Davis. Bogle also looks at the ongoing careers of such stars as Denzel Washington and Will Smith and such directors as Spike Lee and John Singleton, observing that questions of diversity in the film industry continue. From The Birth of a Nation, the 1934 Imitation of Life, Gone with the Wind, and Carmen Jones to Shaft, Do the Right Thing, and Boyz N the Hood to Training Day, Dreamgirls, The Help, Django Unchained, and Straight Outta Compton, Donald Bogle compellingly reveals the way in which the images of blacks in American movies have significantly changed-and also the shocking way in which those images have often remained the same.

Author Biography

Donald Bogle is one of the foremost authorities on African Americans in film and the arts. He is the author of the classic Toms, Coons, Mulattoes, Mammies, and Bucks: An Interpretive History of Blacks in American Films (Continuum, 2001). His best-selling Bright Boulevards, Bold Dreams: The Story of Black Hollywood received the Hurston/Wright Finalist Legacy Award in Non-fiction. His other books include the critically acclaimed Dorothy Dandridge: A Biography; Blacks in American Films and Television: An Illustrated Encyclopedia; and Primetime Blues: African Americans on Network Television. He has appeared on such television programs as Entertainment Tonight; Today; Good Morning, America; and Nightline; and has served as a commentator on such documentaries as Spike Lee's Jim Brown: All-American, American Movie Classics' Small Steps . . . Big Strides, and TV Land's three-part series on African Americans on television. He also co-hosted Turner Classic Movies' award-winning series Race and Hollywood. The first edition of his volume Brown Sugar covered eighty years of America's black female superstars and was turned into a highly successful four-part PBS documentary series by Mr. Bogle.

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
1. Black Beginnings: From Uncle Tom's Cabin to The Birth of a Nation
2. Into the 1920s: The Jesters
3. The 1930s: The Servants
4. The Interlude: Black-Market Cinema
5. The 1940s: The Entertainers, the New Negroes, and the Problem People
6. The 1950s: Black Stars
7. The 1960s: Problem People into Militants
8: The 1970s: Bucks and a Black Movie Boom
9. The 1980s: Black Superstars and the Era of Tan
10: The 1990s: New Stars, New Filmmakers, and a New African American Cinema
11: The 2000s: The New Millennium
12. The 2010s: The New Decades
Index

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