9781607810117

Traces of Fremont : Society and Rock Art in Ancient Utah

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781607810117

  • ISBN10:

    1607810115

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 4/1/2010
  • Publisher: Univ of Utah Pr
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Summary

Fremont is a culture (ca. 300-1300 A.D.) first defined by archaeologist Noel Morss in 1928 based on characteristics unique to the area. Intially thought to be a simple socio-political system, recent reassessments of the Fremont assume a more complex society. This volume places Fremont rock art studies in this contemporary context. Author Steven Simms offers an innovative model of Fremont society, politics, and world-view using the principles of analogy and current archaeological evidence.Simms takes readers on a trip back in time by describing what a typical Fremont "hamlet" or residential area might have looked like a thousand years ago, including the inhabitants' daily activities. Francois Gohier's captivating photographs of Fremont art and artifacts offer an engaging complement to Simms's text, aiding us in our understanding of the lives of these ancient people.Simms's book is excellent! I really like his take on Fremont, I like the narrative descriptions of various Fremont settlements, and I like his treatment of rock art--balanced and scholarly without losing the interest and excitement of that astonishing Fremont medium.--Stephen H. Lekson, professor of anthropology and curator, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History

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