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  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 10/1/2009
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
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One of the most ubiquitous items of the 1960s and 1970s, the black light poster represented some of the most imaginative, colorful, and "out there" creativity of the period;Ultravioletis the first book to ever celebrate this alternative art form. Daniel Donahue, an amateur historian of counterculture, has collected hundreds of vintage blacklight posters and chosen 69 of the best for this volume. Covering some of the more relevant subjects of the period, including Sex, Drugs, Rock 'N' Roll, Earth Awareness, Black Power, and Astrology, Ultraviolet has been printed with flourescent inks so that the pages will actually glow under black light. This hip volume is a gift from the fifth dimension for anyone interested in alternative culture or graphic design.

Author Biography

Daniel Donahue is an artist, designer, songwriter, and amateur historian and collector of counter-culture memorabilia. He lives in Brooklyn.
MGMT is an alternative neopsychedelic band based in Brooklyn. Their debut release, Oracular Spectacular, was named best album of 2008 by NME.

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