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Understanding Emotions, 2nd Edition,9781405131032
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Understanding Emotions, 2nd Edition

by ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9781405131032

ISBN10:
1405131039
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 3/1/2006.
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Summary

Keith Oatley and Jennifer M. Jenkins's best-selling book on the psychology of emotions is the most highly regarded and engaging text for the emotions course. While retaining its interdisciplinary breadth, historical insights, and engaging format, this new edition adds the expertise of outstanding researcher and dedicated teacher Dacher Keltner. The second edition has been thoroughly updated to reflect the latest research and developments in emotions and includes the following features: Cohesive synthesis of evolutionary and cultural approaches to emotion New chapters on communication of emotion, bodily changes, and appraisal Increased emphasis on interpersonal implications of emotions, including studies of newly discovered expressions and systems of communication New coverage on moral judgment, individual differences, gene-environment interactions, and positive emotions New coverage of subjective well-being and pro-social emotions like gratitude and compassion Updated references throughout reflect current research and data, including research on affective neuroscience A new design and pedagogical features include new integrated boxes that depict historical landmarks and historical figures, updated tables, boldfaced terms, and end-of-chapter summaries. An Instructor's Manual with lecture notes and teaching tips is available upon request. Please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com/oatley.

Author Biography

Keith Oatley is Director of the Cognitive Science Program, University of Toronto. He is the author of more than 130 scholarly articles and seven books, including Emotions: A Brief History (Blackwell, 2004), and two novels.

Dacher Keltner is professor of psychology at University of California at Berkeley, and the author of more than 80 scholarly articles and one book. He received the 2000 Templeton Positive Psychology Prize for Excellence in Research, and two university-wide teaching awards at UC Berkeley.

Jennifer M. Jenkins is Professor in the Department of Human Development and Applied Psychology at the University of Toronto. She is co-editor, with Keith Oatley, of Human Emotions: A Reader (Blackwell, 1998). She now heads a large research project on gene-environment interactions in children.

Table of Contents

Figures
xiv
Tables
xviii
Preface xx
Acknowledgments xxiii
Part I Perspectives on Emotions
1(80)
Approaches to Understanding Emotions
3(30)
Introduction
4(1)
Nineteenth-century founders
4(6)
Charles Darwin: the evolutionary approach
4(3)
William James: the bodily approach
7(1)
Sigmund Freud: the psychoanalytic approach
8(2)
Philosophical and literary approaches
10(7)
Aristotle: the conceptual approach
11(2)
Rene Descartes: the philosophical approach
13(1)
George Eliot: the literary approach
14(3)
Brain science, psychology, sociology
17(10)
Walter Cannon and Walter Hess: brain science
17(3)
Magda Arnold and Sylvan Tomkins: new psychological theories
20(2)
Stanley Schachter and Jerome Singer, and Alice Isen: the new experimenters
22(3)
Erving Goffman and Arlie Russell Hochschild: the dramaturgical perspective
25(2)
What is an emotion? Preliminary distinctions
27(4)
Theorists' conceptions of emotion
28(1)
The affective realm: emotions -- moods -- dispositions
29(2)
Summary
31(1)
Further reading
31(2)
Evolution of Emotions
33(24)
Elements of an evolutionary approach to emotions
34(5)
Selection pressures
34(1)
Adaptation
35(4)
Emotions serve functions
39(1)
Emotions are species-characteristic patterns of action
40(2)
Origins of human emotions
42(9)
The social lives of our living primate relatives
42(5)
Evidence of human ancestry
47(3)
Hunter-gathering ways of life
50(1)
Summary of the environment of evolutionary adaptedness
51(1)
Emotions as bases of social relationships
51(3)
The evolution of language
54(1)
Summary
55(1)
Further reading
55(2)
Cultural Understandings of Emotions
57(24)
The construction of emotions in the West
58(4)
The elements of a cultural approach to emotion
62(6)
The self-construal approach: independent and interdependent selves
63(2)
The values approach
65(2)
The epistemological approach
67(1)
Approaches to studying cultural influences on emotion
68(7)
Cross-cultural comparisons
68(1)
Ethnographies
69(3)
Historical approaches
72(3)
Integrating evolutionary and cultural approaches to emotion
75(3)
Summary
78(1)
Further reading
79(2)
Part II Elements of Emotions
81(110)
Communication of Emotions
83(32)
Five kinds of nonverbal behavior
84(3)
Facial expressions of emotion
87(13)
Studies of the universality of facial expressions
88(3)
Critiques of the studies of universal facial expressions
91(1)
Discovering new facial displays of emotions
92(4)
Facial expression and the coordination of social interaction
96(1)
Cultural variation in facial expressions of emotions
97(3)
Vocal communication of emotions
100(5)
The nature and measurement of vocal communication
101(1)
Examples of vocal communication: teasing and laughter
101(1)
The communication of emotions with the voice
102(3)
Communication of emotions by touch
105(2)
Four functions of touch
105(1)
Communicating emotions with touch
106(1)
Communication of emotion in art
107(5)
The Romantic hypothesis and four kinds of evidence
108(2)
Aesthetic emotions in the Natyasastra
110(2)
Summary
112(1)
Further reading
113(2)
Bodily Changes and Emotion
115(24)
The autonomic nervous system
117(5)
The parasympathetic and sympathetic branches
118(2)
Cannon's critique of autonomic specificity
120(2)
A two-factor theory of emotion
122(7)
Evidence for autonomic specificity in emotion
124(2)
The blush
126(2)
Parasympathetic response and social connection
128(1)
Emotional experience with reduced bodily input
129(2)
Action and emotion
131(2)
Eliciting emotion by bodily action
133(1)
The somatic marker hypothesis
134(2)
Summary
136(1)
Further reading
137(2)
Emotions and the Brain
139(26)
How do brain mechanisms of emotion work?
140(16)
Early research on brain lesions and stimulation
142(1)
The limbic system
143(4)
The amygdala as an emotional computer
147(2)
Prefrontal cortex, emotion, and emotion regulation
149(2)
Lateralization effects and emotions
151(5)
Mirror neurons and empathy
156(1)
Neurochemicals and the emotions
156(7)
Serotonin and serotonin reuptake inhibitors
158(1)
Peptide effects on fear
159(1)
The nucleus accumbens, dopamine, and the opiates
160(1)
Oxytocin
161(2)
Integration of neurochemical and anatomical information in emotional behavior
163(1)
Summary
163(1)
Further reading
164(1)
Appraisal, Knowledge, and Experience
165(26)
Appraisal and emotion
167(5)
Historical background and definitions
167(2)
Automatic appraisals of good and bad
169(3)
Is the bad stronger than the good?
172(1)
Appraisal theories and distinct emotions
172(6)
Discrete approaches to appraisal
173(2)
Dimensional approaches to appraisal
175(3)
Critiques of appraisal research and new methods for studying appraisal
178(2)
Cultural variation in appraisal
179(1)
Knowledge of emotion
180(6)
Emotion words
181(2)
Concepts of emotion as prototypes
183(2)
Categorical properties of emotion knowledge
185(1)
Experience
186(3)
Measurement of experience
187(1)
Specific emotions and core affect
188(1)
Summary
189(1)
Further reading
190(1)
Part III Emotions and Social Life
191(98)
Development of Emotions in Childhood
193(32)
The emergence of emotions
194(7)
Emotions in the first year of life
194(4)
Dynamic systems
198(3)
Developmental changes in elicitation of emotion
201(1)
Infants' perceptions and parents' special expressions
202(2)
Attachment
204(3)
Cooperative action and the goal corrected partnership
207(1)
Construction of the child's relationship with others
208(6)
Differentiation between self and others
211(2)
The language of emotions in cooperative action
213(1)
Emotions in play and games
214(1)
Children's understanding of emotions as mental states
215(2)
Emotional competence
217(5)
Inner and outer emotions
218(2)
Emotions and relationships, emotions and selfhood
220(2)
Summary
222(1)
Further reading
223(2)
Emotions in Social Relationships
225(32)
Social goals and social emotions
226(6)
Three kinds of social motivation: attachment, affiliation, and assertion
228(1)
Attachment and its separation from affiliation
229(2)
Emotions as social
231(1)
Emotions within intimate relationships
232(8)
Early attachment as a template for later love
232(1)
Maternal caregiving and affiliative warmth
232(2)
Affiliation and sexual relating
234(1)
Principles of sexual love
235(2)
Anger and contempt in marriage
237(2)
Friendship and gratitude
239(1)
Emotions of assertion within groups
240(8)
Cross-cultural variations in the management of anger
242(4)
Cultural codes
246(1)
Gender relations
246(2)
Emotions between groups
248(7)
Intergroup conflict
249(3)
Violence between societies
252(1)
Disgust and contempt
253(2)
Summary
255(1)
Further reading
256(1)
Emotions and Cognition
257(32)
Historical perspectives on the interplay between passion and reason
259(1)
Emotions as prioritizers of thoughts, goals, and actions
260(2)
Three perspectives on the effects of emotions on cognitive functioning
262(6)
Emotion congruence
263(2)
Feelings as information
265(2)
Processing style
267(1)
Effects of moods and emotions on cognitive functioning
268(18)
Perceptual effects
268(1)
Attentional qualities of emotions
269(2)
Emotions and memory
271(3)
A bias for recalling emotionally evocative events
274(1)
Emotional involvement and eyewitness testimony
274(3)
Effects of moods and emotions upon remembering
277(2)
Effects of moods and emotions on judgment
279(3)
Persuasion
282(2)
Emotions and moral judgment
284(2)
Summary
286(1)
Further reading
286(3)
Part IV Emotions and the Individual
289(123)
Individual Differences and Personality
291(30)
Introduction
292(1)
Emotion regulation
292(3)
Attachment
295(6)
The ``Strange Situation'' and styles of attachment
295(2)
Internal working models of attachment
297(2)
Influences on attachment
299(1)
Effects of attachment
300(1)
Warmth and the socialization of emotions
301(7)
Learning to speak about emotions
302(1)
Effects of modeling
303(1)
Responding to some emotions but not others
303(3)
How cultures affect the development of emotionality
306(1)
Emotion schemas: bridges from childhood to adult relationships
307(1)
Temperament
308(5)
Biases of emotion at the core of temperament
308(1)
Stability of temperament
308(2)
Genetic basis of temperament
310(2)
Temperament and parenting
312(1)
Affective biases, adult personality, and the course of life
313(6)
Patterns of childhood emotionality that extend to adult life
313(1)
Emotion is central to adult personality dimensions and traits
314(1)
Individual differences in emotion shape how we construe the world
315(1)
Emotional dispositions shape the course of life
316(3)
Summary
319(1)
Further reading
320(1)
Emotions and Mental Health in Childhood
321(32)
Emotions and disorders
322(5)
The case of Peter
322(1)
Classifying childhood disorders
323(1)
How are emotions involved in children's disorders?
324(1)
What is disordered?
325(2)
Prevalence of disorders in childhood
327(3)
Externalizing disorders
327(1)
Anxiety disorders
328(1)
Depressive disorders
329(1)
The stress-diathesis hypothesis
330(13)
Risks
330(9)
Combinations of risks
339(1)
Bi-directional effects
340(1)
Protective factors
340(2)
Effects of genes
342(1)
Specific genes, maltreatment, and externalizing disorder
343(1)
Continuity of disorders
344(3)
Therapy and prevention
347(3)
Summary
350(1)
Further reading
351(2)
Emotions and Mental Health in Adulthood
353(32)
Psychiatric disorders: symptoms and prevalence
354(7)
Psychiatric epidemiology
354(4)
Different kinds of depression and anxiety
358(3)
Stress and diathesis in the causation of disorders
361(12)
Stresses: life events and difficulties
361(4)
Relation between emotions and emotional disorders
365(1)
Diatheses: vulnerability factors
366(7)
Factors in recovery and in prolongation
373(4)
Cognitive processes
373(2)
Interpersonal effects
375(2)
Mind over matter?
377(1)
Emotions and mental health beyond depression and anxiety
377(5)
Expressed Emotion and relapse in schizophrenia
377(2)
Psychosomatic illness
379(3)
Summary
382(1)
Further reading
382(3)
Psychotherapy, Consciousness, and Well-being
385(27)
Psychological therapies and the emotions
386(3)
The basic idea of psychoanalytic therapy
387(2)
Therapy's focus on the emotions
389(10)
Psychoanalysis: unconscious schemas of relating
389(3)
Cognitive-behavioral therapy: changing emotions by thought
392(3)
Emotion-focused therapy: changing emotions by emotions
395(1)
Outcomes of therapy
396(2)
Psychotherapy without professionals
398(1)
Consciousness and making sense of emotions
399(3)
Becoming conscious of emotions in literature
400(2)
Emotions and art
402(1)
Emotional creativity
402(4)
Emotions in drama, ritual, and art
403(2)
Cultures of understanding
405(1)
Happiness and well-being
406(4)
Flow
407(1)
Positive emotions and subjective well-being
408(2)
Summary
410(1)
Further reading
411(1)
Glossary 412(13)
References 425(60)
Subject Index 485(8)
Author Index 493


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