CART

(0) items

Understanding Social Welfare,9780801330360
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Understanding Social Welfare

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780801330360

ISBN10:
080133036X
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
8/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $76.00

Buy New Textbook

Currently Available, Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
$74.10

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 5th edition with a publication date of 8/1/1999.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Related Products


  • Understanding Social Welfare
    Understanding Social Welfare
  • Understanding Social Welfare
    Understanding Social Welfare
  • Understanding Social Welfare : A Search for Social Justice
    Understanding Social Welfare : A Search for Social Justice
  • Understanding Social Welfare : A Search for Social Justice
    Understanding Social Welfare : A Search for Social Justice
  • Understanding Social Welfare : A Search for Social Justice
    Understanding Social Welfare : A Search for Social Justice
  • Understanding Social Welfare A Search for Social Justice Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package
    Understanding Social Welfare A Search for Social Justice Plus MySearchLab with eText -- Access Card Package




Summary

Understanding Social Welfare introduces students to the issues, historical influences and trends, methods of operation, and unresolved conflicts of American social welfare. It helps them acquire the basic tools for understanding, analyzing, and evaluating social welfare policies and programs. The text focuses on the impact of social structure on people's lives; emphasizes the current concerns of today's diverse client population; and incorporates the latest social welfare legislation.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
CHAPTER ONE Socio-Economic Structure, Human Needs, and Mutual Responsibility
1(15)
Overview
1(1)
The Impact of Social and Economic Structures
2(2)
Defining Social Welfare and Social Work
4(1)
The American Myth of the Hero
5(5)
New Forms of Blaming the Victim
8(2)
The Authors' Perspective
10(3)
Summary
13(1)
Questions for Consideration
13(1)
Notes
14(2)
CHAPTER TWO Social Values and Social Welfare
16(21)
Overview
16(1)
Modern Views of Humanity
17(1)
Self-Actualization versus Irritation Response Theories
18(1)
Economics and Human Motivation
19(1)
An Overview of History
20(2)
Altruism and Mutual Aid
20(2)
Ancient Cultures
22(5)
Egypt
22(1)
Sumer and Babylonia
23(1)
Hebrew and Judaic Societies
24(2)
Greece and Rome
26(1)
Christianity
27(2)
Byzantium: Christianity in the East
28(1)
Holy Poverty and Expectations of the Wealthy
29(1)
Eastern Cultures
30(3)
China
31(1)
India
32(1)
Islam
33(1)
Summary: Evolving Values and Social Welfare
33(1)
Questions for Consideration
34(1)
Notes
34(3)
CHAPTER THREE Social Values and Social Welfare: England From the Middle Ages Onward
37(24)
Overview
37(1)
The Early Middle Ages
37(2)
The Middle Middle Ages
39(1)
The Late Middle Ages to Elizabethan Poor Laws
40(4)
Work and Religion
44(4)
The Poor Laws
48(3)
The Poor Law Compilation of 1601
49(2)
Speenhamland
51(2)
The Workhouse
53(1)
The Poor Law of 1834
54(1)
Principles of the Poor Laws
55(2)
Summary
57(1)
Questions for Consideration
58(1)
Notes
58(3)
CHAPTER FOUR Social Values and Social Welfare: The American Experience I
61(27)
Overview
61(1)
American Poor Law Mentality
61(4)
Settlements, Labor, and Imported "Poor Laws"
62(3)
The Early Spanish Influence, the Mexicans, and Other Latinos
65(2)
Voluntary Mutual Aid Efforts
67(1)
Mutual Aid among African Americans
67(4)
The American Frontier: The Myth and Values
71(2)
Native Americans and U.S. History
73(3)
The Federal Role in Social Welfare
76(1)
The Freedmen's Bureau
77(2)
Veterans and a Suspension of the Ethic
79(1)
Social Darwinism
80(1)
The Coming of Social Insurance
81(1)
Society, Social Values, and Modern Views of Human Nature
82(1)
Summary
83(1)
Questions for Consideration
84(1)
Notes
84(4)
CHAPTER FIVE America, Poverty, Two Paths: The American Experience II
88(23)
Three Discoveries of Poverty
88(6)
First Discovery
89(1)
The Fading of the First Discovery
90(1)
Second Discovery
90(1)
Third Discovery
91(3)
The War on Poverty
94(2)
Expectation and Delivery
95(1)
The "Skirmish" against Poverty
96(2)
Families, Children, and Poverty
98(8)
Aid to Families with Dependent Children ("Welfare")
98(4)
An Old-New Path
102(2)
Temporary Assistance to Needy Families
104(1)
Social Security
105(1)
Contrasting Values and Aims
106(1)
The Poor Laws Today
106(2)
Human Nature and the American Dream
108(1)
Summary
109(1)
Questions for Consideration
109(1)
Notes
109(2)
CHAPTER SIX Concepts for Social Welfare
111(25)
Overview
111(1)
What Is Social Welfare?
111(3)
Social Policy, Social Services, and Social Work
114(1)
Social Policy
114(1)
Social Services
114(1)
Social Work
115(1)
Ideology, Social Policy, and Government Intervention
115(11)
The Federal and Pluralist System
121(1)
The Economic Sphere
122(4)
The Importance of Fiscal and Monetary Policy
126(2)
An International Economy
128(1)
A Second Welfare System--Corporate Welfare
129(5)
A Changed World--New/Old Ideology, New Policies, New Economic Forces, New Social Policy, and New Social Services
130(2)
A Changed Context
132(2)
Summary
134(1)
Questions for Consideration
134(1)
Notes
134(2)
CHAPTER SEVEN Examining a Social Welfare Program: Structural Components, Alternative Program Characteristics, and Evaluation
136(24)
Overview
136(1)
Structural Components
137(5)
What Are the Needs and Goals to Be Met?
137(1)
What Is the Form of Benefit That the Program Produces?
138(1)
Who Is Eligible for the Program?
138(1)
How Is the Program Financed?
139(2)
What Is the Level of Administration?
141(1)
Alternative Program Characteristics
142(11)
Residual, Institutional, Developmental, Socio-Economic Development
142(3)
Selective or Universal
145(4)
Benefits in Money, Services, or Utilities
149(2)
Public or Private
151(1)
Central or Local
151(2)
Lay or Professional
153(1)
Evaluating the Program
153(5)
Adequacy
154(1)
Financing
154(3)
Coherence
157(1)
Latent Consequences
157(1)
Summary
158(1)
Questions for Consideration
158(1)
Notes
158(2)
CHAPTER EIGHT The Welfare Society and Its Clients
160(31)
Overview
160(1)
Who Is a Client of Social Welfare?
160(2)
What Is Poverty?
162(4)
Absolute Poverty
162(3)
Relative Poverty
165(1)
Subjective Poverty
166(1)
A Description of the Poor
166(6)
Income and Wealth Inequality
172(2)
The Effect of Some Government Programs
174(2)
The Near-Poor and Expectations
176(1)
Other Views of Poverty
177(1)
Relative Inequality
178(3)
Lack of Power, Access, and Inclusion
179(1)
The Underclass/Culture of Poverty Thesis
180(1)
Strategies for Fighting Poverty
181(5)
Social Utilities
181(1)
Investment in Human Capital
182(1)
Income Transfers
183(1)
Rehabilitation
183(1)
Aggregative and Selective Economic Measures
184(2)
Participation and Organization
186(1)
Ideology Revisited
186(2)
Summary
188(1)
Questions for Consideration
189(1)
Notes
189(2)
CHAPTER NINE Current Social Welfare Programs--Economic Security
191(41)
Overview
191(1)
Social Insurance Programs
192(22)
Social Security (OASDI)
192(13)
Unemployment Compensation
205(5)
Workers' Compensation
210(4)
Income Support Programs
214(15)
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
215(7)
Supplemental Security Income
222(3)
General Assistance
225(2)
Earned Income Tax Credit
227(2)
Summary
229(1)
Questions for Consideration
229(1)
Notes
230(2)
CHAPTER TEN Social Welfare Programs: Sustaining the Quality of Life
232(47)
Overview
232(7)
Managed Care: A Radical Change
232(2)
Major Organizational Types
234(1)
Impact on Services and Practitioners
235(1)
Proponents
235(1)
Criticisms
235(1)
Research on Quality of Care
236(1)
Strategies to Achieve Profits
236(1)
Public Criticism and Legislation
236(2)
Social Work Roles
238(1)
Health Care Programs
239(11)
Medicare
239(5)
Medicaid
244(6)
Nutrition Programs
250(5)
The Food Stamp Program
250(2)
Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children
252(2)
School Lunch and Breakfast Programs
254(1)
Low-Income Home Energy Assistance
255(1)
Goals
255(1)
Housing
256(3)
Veterans' Benefits
259(4)
Employment Programs
263(1)
Personal Social Services
264(7)
Services to Families
265(1)
Services to Children
266(3)
Title XX
269(2)
Mental Health Services
271(2)
Corrections
273(3)
Summary
276(1)
Questions for Consideration
276(1)
Notes
276(3)
CHAPTER ELEVEN Nonprofit and Private Social Welfare
279(22)
Overview
279(1)
Early Patterns
279(1)
The Nonprofit Sector
280(2)
Types of Nonprofit Agencies
281(1)
The Proprietary Private For-Profit Organization
282(1)
Services of the Nonprofit and Private Sectors
283(1)
Getting and Spending
283(4)
Private and Nonprofit Agencies as Social Welfare Programs
287(3)
Family and Friends
288(2)
A Point of View
290(1)
Leadership, Class, and Gender
291(1)
Private and Public Spheres
292(3)
Uses of Public Funds and Power
292(1)
Tax Laws and Policy
293(1)
Accountability
294(1)
National Policy
294(1)
Marketplace and the Nonmarket Domain
295(1)
The Family
296(1)
Toward the Future
296(2)
Summary
298(1)
Questions for Consideration
298(1)
Notes
298(3)
CHAPTER TWELVE Social Work: The Emergence of a Profession
301(22)
Overview
301(1)
The Workers of "Good Works"
302(5)
The Process of Professionalization
307(1)
A Brief History of Practice and Methods
308(4)
Development of the Professional Association
312(2)
Social Work with Groups
314(2)
Community Organization and Social Planning
316(2)
Toward a Unified Profession
318(1)
Summary
319(1)
Questions for Consideration
319(1)
Notes
319(4)
CHAPTER THIRTEEN Social Work: Functions, Context, and Issues
323(20)
Overview
323(1)
The Purposes of Social Work
323(2)
The Professional within the Organizational Context
325(1)
The Professional within Complex Organizations
325(3)
Complex Organizations and Professional Culture
326(1)
Complex Organizations and Authority
326(1)
The Profession and Professional Autonomy
327(1)
Alternative Roles and Settings
328(1)
Society, the Functions of Social Work, and Services for People
328(1)
The "Bottom Line"
329(1)
The Two Tracks of Social Work: Cause and Function
329(5)
Generic-Specific Social Work
334(2)
Professionals and Volunteers
336(2)
The Number of Social Workers
337(1)
The Impact of Managed Care
338(1)
Racism, Sexism, and a Pluralistic Society
338(2)
Summary
340(1)
Questions for Consideration
340(1)
Notes
340(3)
CHAPTER FOURTEEN Social Trends Affecting Social Welfare
343(24)
Overview
343(1)
Growth, Demography, and Resources: International Perspectives
343(4)
Growth and Demography: The United States
347(3)
Population Growth
347(1)
The Family
348(2)
Aging
350(1)
Fertility Rate
350(1)
Productivity and the Service Economy
350(2)
A National Society
352(1)
Individual and Shared Goals
352(1)
Ethnicity and Pluralism
353(2)
Gender
355(2)
Gays and Lesbians
357(3)
The New Property
360(1)
Additional Societal Issues Affecting Social Welfare
361(2)
Technological Change
361(1)
Crime
361(1)
The Place of Social Welfare in a Changing Context
362(1)
Summary
363(1)
Questions for Consideration
363(1)
Notes
363(4)
CHAPTER FIFTEEN Alternative Programs to Meet Social Welfare Needs
367(34)
Overview
367(1)
Female Heads of Household, Children, and Poverty
368(5)
Limitations of Current Programs
370(1)
Improved Social Policy
371(1)
A Set of Ideal Services
371(2)
The Aging and Long-Term Home Health Care
373(5)
Immigration
378(5)
Implications
382(1)
Persons with Disabilities
383(4)
Civil Rights
384(1)
Family and Medical Leave Act
385(1)
Children, Learning, and Social Participation
386(1)
General Social Services for Persons with Disabilities
387(1)
Alternatives Facing the Practitioner
387(4)
Technology and Social Action
389(2)
Where We Are
391(3)
Two Scenarios
394(1)
Our Proposal
394(1)
Summary
395(1)
Questions for Consideration
395(1)
Notes
396(5)
APPENDIX Sources of Information 401
Index 405(10)
About the Authors 415


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...